Are there comparisons of SSD vs HDD?

tymaster50

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Oct 3, 2012
2,783
7
New Jersey
I know all about the solid state drive, how its faster for reading and writing but I don't even notice the R/W times on my MBP, and the SSD costs more, I have like 500GB on my HD and it costs a lot to get the equivalent in the rMBP
 

dextr3k

macrumors 6502
Nov 26, 2012
357
1
SSD Read and Write times affect everything in the system's performance. You will get fast loading, some people have said from cold boot to usable in 15 seconds. Your applications will start faster, and you get better performance because your page in/out will be faster as well.

Its not just the speed of writing a file. I find that you don't think you need something, but once you have it, you don't want to go back.

So you are correct, you aren't going to be annoyed if you get a HDD, but just don't use a SSD. :eek:
 

sammich

macrumors 601
Sep 26, 2006
4,289
218
Sarcasmville.
Yes.

Yes there are.

In almost every metric measurable, SSDs are faster. In many of those metrics, SSDs are orders of magnitude faster.

You say you don't mind the responsiveness on your current machine. It's because you're accustomed to it, because you don't know how much better it can be.

Honestly, though, they do cost more and space may become a limited resource depending on your usage. If system responsiveness bothers you (trust me, once you go SSD, everything else feels slower) then you should upgrade. But if you're happy where you are, and it doesn't matter then I would let your eventual hardware upgrade be SSD equipped.
 

tymaster50

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Oct 3, 2012
2,783
7
New Jersey
Yes.

Yes there are.

In almost every metric measurable, SSDs are faster. In many of those metrics, SSDs are orders of magnitude faster.

You say you don't mind the responsiveness on your current machine. It's because you're accustomed to it, because you don't know how much better it can be.

Honestly, though, they do cost more and space may become a limited resource depending on your usage. If system responsiveness bothers you (trust me, once you go SSD, everything else feels slower) then you should upgrade. But if you're happy where you are, and it doesn't matter then I would let your eventual hardware upgrade be SSD equipped.
It would actually be dumb for me to upgrade seeing as how I still sometimes use CDs/DVDs. Granted I haven't used one recently but it is good to have a built in option instead of buying a DVD drive for the rmbp. I'm sure i can sell this and make a decent profit but in the long run it wouldn't be worth it. 2000 dollars, just about 700 more than I paid. That is a PS4 and some games if you go just off the difference in price lol
 

Pentad

macrumors 6502a
Nov 26, 2003
985
97
Indiana
I know all about the solid state drive, how its faster for reading and writing but I don't even notice the R/W times on my MBP, and the SSD costs more, I have like 500GB on my HD and it costs a lot to get the equivalent in the rMBP
Once you go SSD you will never go back. You can't begin to imagine how much faster your system will become with an SSD.

Everything else in your system is measured in nanoseconds (CPU, RAM, BUS) but the HD is measured in milliseconds. 1 millisecond is equal to a million nanoseconds. That is how much slower your HD is. That is a huge bottleneck.

I promise you, you will think you bought a new computer when you add an SSD.

-P
 

tymaster50

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Oct 3, 2012
2,783
7
New Jersey
Once you go SSD you will never go back. You can't begin to imagine how much faster your system will become with an SSD.

Everything else in your system is measured in nanoseconds (CPU, RAM, BUS) but the HD is measured in milliseconds. 1 millisecond is equal to a million nanoseconds. That is how much slower your HD is. That is a huge bottleneck.

I promise you, you will think you bought a new computer when you add an SSD.

-P
I'll pick up one when the price goes down. $2000 is too much to justify, you can get a car with that price lol
 

andalusia

macrumors 68030
Apr 10, 2009
2,945
6
Manchester, UK
In almost every metric measurable, SSDs are faster. In many of those metrics, SSDs are orders of magnitude faster.
100% accurate. I didn't quite understand how much quicker SSDs are over HDDs until I compared two identical machines side by side, except one of them had an SSD. And my face was like this at the speed boost: :eek:

It would actually be dumb for me to upgrade seeing as how I still sometimes use CDs/DVDs. Granted I haven't used one recently but it is good to have a built in option instead of buying a DVD drive for the rmbp. I'm sure i can sell this and make a decent profit but in the long run it wouldn't be worth it. 2000 dollars, just about 700 more than I paid. That is a PS4 and some games if you go just off the difference in price lol
You do realise you can upgrade to an SSD in your current machine without buying a Retina Macbook Pro?
 

tymaster50

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Oct 3, 2012
2,783
7
New Jersey

Sital

macrumors 68000
May 31, 2012
1,881
431
New England
SSD Read and Write times affect everything in the system's performance. You will get fast loading, some people have said from cold boot to usable in 15 seconds. Your applications will start faster, and you get better performance because your page in/out will be faster as well.

Its not just the speed of writing a file. I find that you don't think you need something, but once you have it, you don't want to go back.

So you are correct, you aren't going to be annoyed if you get a HDD, but just don't use a SSD. :eek:
This is spot on. Now that I have an SSD, I can't/won't go back to an HDD.
 

takeshi74

macrumors 601
Feb 9, 2011
4,974
68
$2000 is too much to justify, you can get a car with that price lol
A $2,000 car does nothing for the performance of my Macbook. Nor does a PS4 or games. You have to determine whether the boost from an SSD takes priority over all the other random comparisons you're mentioning or not.

You say you don't mind the responsiveness on your current machine. It's because you're accustomed to it, because you don't know how much better it can be.
^ This. It's difficult to assess that which you haven't experienced.
 
Last edited:

amoda

macrumors 6502a
Aug 9, 2006
657
8
I would say a car is more useful :p
I'm not sure where the $2,000 price tag for a SSD came from. At that price you can buy a new laptop with an SSD built-in.

Andalusia already linked a highly rated 500GB SSD for $325, or a 250GB SSD for $170. Even the 750GB model is $450. There are probably cheaper alternatives too.

Regarding installation, you can either do it yourself following a guide such as this, or pay someone $40-$60 to do it for you.

Whether $250-450 is worth it for an SSD that's only up to you. Like others have said, SSDs beat HDs in every metric, including longevity.
 

tymaster50

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Oct 3, 2012
2,783
7
New Jersey
I'm not sure where the $2,000 price tag for a SSD came from. At that price you can buy a new laptop with an SSD built-in.

Andalusia already linked a highly rated 500GB SSD for $325, or a 250GB SSD for $170. Even the 750GB model is $450. There are probably cheaper alternatives too.

Regarding installation, you can either do it yourself following a guide such as this, or pay someone $40-$60 to do it for you.

Whether $250-450 is worth it for an SSD that's only up to you. Like others have said, SSDs beat HDs in every metric, including longevity.
the rMBP with 512GB is $2000, people keep saying to get it so i just associated them together, $325 is much more believable but I have nowhere to backup my stuff too unless I can somehow do a transfer to transfer. I will NOT start over again lol.
 

john123

macrumors 68030
Jul 20, 2001
2,502
1,401
the rMBP with 512GB is $2000, people keep saying to get it so i just associated them together, $325 is much more believable but I have nowhere to backup my stuff too unless I can somehow do a transfer to transfer. I will NOT start over again lol.
If you have no backup disk, purchase a USB 3.0 external enclosure off Amazon. You can get one for $10-$20. Then, put the SSD into that, and use something like Carbon Copy Cloner or Super Duper to clone your hard drive onto the SSD. After that, you can open your laptop out and swap the SSD and HDD. The installation really is easy, even if you've never done it before. Even if you go slowly, it won't take more than 20 minutes, max. I can do it in 5, and I've only done a few of them.

The benefit of my approach is that when you're done, you WILL have a backup drive: your old hard drive!
 

yjchua95

macrumors 604
Apr 23, 2011
6,725
231
GVA, KUL, MEL (current), ZQN

zhenya

macrumors 604
Jan 6, 2005
6,735
3,355
I have been using SSD's for nearly 5 years now. I honestly can't stand to use a computer without one. Everything you think is slow about your current computer is almost certainly just that you have a very slow hard disk.
 

thundersteele

macrumors 68030
Oct 19, 2011
2,984
8
Switzerland
tymaster50, if you are happy with the performance of your machine, then I don't see a reason to change it.

Right now I have an iMac with regular HDD at work, while my MBP has a Samsung 830 SSD that I installed some time ago. At the end of the day, the difference is not so huge. Since I never turn off the iMac, and it has 16 GB of RAM, App loading times are never an issue, and neither are boot times.

Now for laptops I still think SSDs is the way to go for the future, and most vendors seem to agree. First, laptop HDDs tend to be slower than desktop HDDs due to the smaller form factor, so there is more of a speed gap. Then SSDs come in smaller form factors, are less sensitive to shocks and sudden acceleration, and speed up sleep/resume cycles.

Now since you don't feel comfortable upgrading the HDD yourself, I guess you can just wait with the switch to SSDs when you decide to buy a new laptop. Prices won't go up most likely ;)
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.