Are we being scammed?

Twimfy

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Sep 11, 2011
880
227
UK
Ok so about a month ago we sold an iPhone 4 16GB to a girl. It was locked to the O2 network and we'd bought it second hand but my mum used it for 18 months with absolutely no issue.

Out of the blue the girl who bought it has come back and said she wants her money back because the phone has been blocked and she had contacted the police to confirm this, which they said it had been stolen.

Not wanting to be the recipient of stolen property back into our home or be scammed we also contacted the police and they recommended a paid for checking service which would run the details of a phone and flag any blocks or restrictions.

It came back completely clean and we sent the report to the girl to confirm this.

After asking a little more detail she simply said that she just got no network at all and it had been blocked (she's not the sharpest of tools) and won't really elaborate.

Today she has come back and said that she has been to the Apple store and they have said that the phone can only now be used on Wifi. Again however she didn't elaborate or go into detail, she wouldn't even say which Apple store (and the nearest is 50 miles from where she lives).

On one hand we feel sorry for her but on the other hand we don't feel like it's our responsibility, also the report states that the phone is legitimately out of contract and has been paid up to date (it's that accurate and the police again confirmed that that's what that part of the report means).

So what other reason could it not be working to the point where Apple would say that it can only be used on WiFi? I mentioned that I really would like to know what Apple said, but she has just got to the point now where she just keeps asking for her money back.

She's being very persistent for a refund (she bought it from us for £130), as far as I'm concerned buying second hand is a risk you take, a risk we accepted when we bought it.

The most worrying thing is that we think that they're a Gypsy family, now please understand that I have no issue with travelling families but round here they are the kind of people who when crossed will set fire to your house first and ask questions later, that is not an exaggeration.

So what can I tell her? She's being so scant on the details and refuses to reveal info so I cannot tell if it could be something simple that could be fixed, in which case we wouldn't mind taking it back because we can just get it working and keep it or move it on again.
 

ross1998

macrumors 6502a
Jan 10, 2013
948
194
Don't know where exactly you live but in Ukraine, most gypsies make a living scamming people out of money.
Maybe she is trying to sell you a different phone than the one you sold to her?
 

DeeGee48

macrumors regular
Jun 28, 2007
215
15
Havertown, Pa
The hell with this!

Ok so about a month ago we sold an iPhone 4 16GB to a girl.

The most worrying thing is that we think that they're a Gypsy family, now please understand that I have no issue with travelling families but round here they are the kind of people who when crossed will set fire to your house first and ask questions later, that is not an exaggeration.
If this is even remotely possible, I'd just give her the money back and sell it to someone else. No use taking the chance of having your house burned down over a sale gone bad!
 

iJustin63

macrumors newbie
Nov 12, 2012
20
0
New York
This is a pretty sketchy situation. I agree that it is not your responsibility if everything is ok with the phone when you checked....
 

dictoresno

macrumors 601
Apr 30, 2012
4,196
465
NJ
compare the serial number of the phone she is trying to return to you with the one you sold her. sounds like she's trying to scam you.
 

sviato

macrumors 68020
Oct 27, 2010
2,274
44
HR 9038 A
The transaction is complete and I'm sure you didn't give any refund policy so I would just ignore her.
 

Radiating

macrumors 65816
Dec 29, 2011
1,018
7
She is scamming you. She had a stolen iphone that was blocked and she wants to turn it into a unblocked phone.
 

sammy-boy

macrumors regular
Nov 2, 2013
183
0
Staffordshire, UK
I'm presuming you have the IMEI number of the phone still that you sold as you've run a check - if you do refund her, as someone's already suggested it could be a different phone - check the IMEI of the phone she's returning to confirm it's the same phone if you go that route.

Was it a face-to-face sale or was it through somewhere like eBay?

Another thought is the phone is activation-locked - was it reset properly? It could be asking for your iCloud password but for whatever reason she's trying to say it's blocked and spinning you a yarn about visiting Apple stores?
 

nox5

macrumors 6502
Oct 16, 2013
412
47
Might be her sim was cancelled or she opened the phone and broke something or did not connect the antenna inside or she caused water damage.
 

Twimfy

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Sep 11, 2011
880
227
UK
I'm presuming you have the IMEI number of the phone still that you sold as you've run a check - if you do refund her, as someone's already suggested it could be a different phone - check the IMEI of the phone she's returning to confirm it's the same phone if you go that route.

Was it a face-to-face sale or was it through somewhere like eBay?

Another thought is the phone is activation-locked - was it reset properly? It could be asking for your iCloud password but for whatever reason she's trying to say it's blocked and spinning you a yarn about visiting Apple stores?
No, we never kept a record of the IMEI number. It's not something you really think of doing at the time.

It was a face to face sale.
 

abz1981

macrumors 65816
Jan 3, 2011
1,013
4
a simple solution to this problem is, ask the girl to meet you at your local police department and this is where the police can confirm the report they got you to check shows the iPhone is not blocked and is completely clean, providing the 2 imei numbers the one she has on her iPhone and the one you have on record matches. Another thing I suggest you do, if possible get in touch with the original seller and ask them to provide you with proof of purchase document of the iPhone. However meeting in a police department to resolve the issue would be the best option in my opinion. Also if you don't have a copy of the imei number, then you need to contact the carrier who your mum used the iPhone on, in order for them to provide you with a proof of usage document, this will show the imei of the iPhone your mum used on o2.
 

Twimfy

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Sep 11, 2011
880
227
UK
a simple solution to this problem is, ask the girl to meet you at your local police department and this is where the police can confirm the report they got you to check shows the iPhone is not blocked and is completely clean, providing the 2 imei numbers the one she has on her iPhone and the one you have on record matches. Another thing I suggest you do, if possible get in touch with the original seller and ask them to provide you with proof of purchase document of the iPhone. However meeting in a police department to resolve the issue would be the best option in my opinion. Also if you don't have a copy of the imei number, then you need to contact the carrier who your mum used the iPhone on, in order for them to provide you with a proof of usage document, this will show the imei of the iPhone your mum used on o2.
Well for starters we're on pay as you go, my mum used Giff Gaff which is O2 compatible but they're a web only company, nobody to call.

As for the previous owner, that information was long lost...we can't even remember where we got it from, 18 months is quite a while and we've checked ebay records and there is no history so it's likely we bought it from a Facebook seller (we do that quite a lot).

The police station is quite a good idea though.
 

JeffiJers

macrumors 6502a
Sep 12, 2012
551
1
U.S.
No, we never kept a record of the IMEI number. It's not something you really think of doing at the time.

It was a face to face sale.
a simple solution to this problem is, ask the girl to meet you at your local police department and this is where the police can confirm the report they got you to check shows the iPhone is not blocked and is completely clean, providing the 2 imei numbers the one she has on her iPhone and the one you have on record matches. Another thing I suggest you do, if possible get in touch with the original seller and ask them to provide you with proof of purchase document of the iPhone. However meeting in a police department to resolve the issue would be the best option in my opinion. Also if you don't have a copy of the imei number, then you need to contact the carrier who your mum used the iPhone on, in order for them to provide you with a proof of usage document, this will show the imei of the iPhone your mum used on o2.

this... and just go back to your cell provider to get the IMEI number YOU activated to make sure it matches hers. Your provide Should? have that on hand. At least in the states they do. GL she sounds like a shady one and I wouldn't give get a dine back.
 

vonWachtstain

macrumors regular
Nov 20, 2011
165
1
She bought it and it worked for a month. So you are clean. Tell her to pound sand. Its not your problem anymore.
 

Applejuiced

macrumors Westmere
Apr 16, 2008
40,650
6,404
At the iPhone hacks section.
I'd tell her to get lost and not bother you again.
She's trying to rip you off and the more you interact with her the more confident she becomes.
It's obvious bs that she's feeding you and you verified that what she's saying is not true so don't fall for it.
 

Troneas

macrumors 65816
Oct 26, 2011
1,377
54
At the alternatives section.
I'd tell her to get lost and not bother you again.
She's trying to rip you off and the more you interact with her the more confident she becomes.
It's obvious bs that she's feeding you and you verified that what she's saying is not true so don't fall for it.

this.


and try to collect as much information on her as you can.

if she persists or makes any threats contact the local authorities and present them the information you've got on her and the phone.

you've done your part by researching that what you sold is legitimate and any malfunction originated from the phone's previous owner should have been brought to your attention within a week at most.
 

Applejuiced

macrumors Westmere
Apr 16, 2008
40,650
6,404
At the iPhone hacks section.
Next time treat it like a Craigslist transaction. Meet in a public place (not your residence) and use a dedicated Google voice number (or equivalent).
From now on I'm always going to use a google voice number for CL transactions.
Don't want anyone on the internet to have my real phone number or like many situations like this where they try to contact you after and pull some nonsense like this to get more money from you or return the product etc....
 

Lucille Carter

Suspended
Jul 3, 2013
1,266
4
Just ignore the buyer as you have done nothing wrong, have you?

If she is a scammer nothing more will happen and the police will never be called.