Become a MacRumors Supporter for $25/year with no ads, private forums, and more!

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Apr 12, 2001
54,972
17,356
Authorities Begin Evidence Examination in Gizmodo iPhone Case




115455-jobs_d8_small.jpg


CNET reports that authorities have begun examining computers and other evidence seized from Gizmodo editor Jason Chen's residence following the purchase of and publication of details on a lost next-generation iPhone. The evidence examination had been on hold since Chen's lawyers raised questions about the legality of the seizure, arguing special protections for Chen under journalist shield laws.
Stephen Wagstaffe, chief deputy district attorney for San Mateo County, told CNET on Wednesday that a court there had appointed a "special master" to search the items seized from the home of Jason Chen in late April. The court has asked the special master to collect only information that pertains to Gizmodo's dealings with an iPhone prototype that the blog purchased for $5,000.
The special master, who has not been identified, is an unpaid, neutral third party appointed by the court to assist in the carrying out of judicial orders. The agent will collect information believed pertinent to the investigation and present it to the court and Chen's lawyers for discussion and final determination of what evidence will be provided to the district attorney for investigation. The report notes that this process could take up to two months.

Earlier this week, Apple CEO Steve Jobs revealed his thoughts on the situation, noting that some people advised him to "let it slide" but that devotion to what he believes are the core values of Apple demands that the company pursue action.

Article Link: Authorities Begin Evidence Examination in Gizmodo iPhone Case
 

Scooterman1

macrumors 6502a
May 15, 2008
939
12
Houston, Tx
It would be interesting to know who this unpaid, 3rd party, is. And what the level of expertise is.
Maybe it's Stephen Gary "Woz" Wozniak.....
 

Mark Booth

macrumors 68000
Original poster
Jan 16, 2008
1,639
478
My thoughts on this turn of events: The district attorney is going to extraordinary lengths to preserve the integrity of the investigation. There's no way in hell that he'd spend the time and money on this if he wasn't pretty certain he'd have some charges to file at the other end.

Bottom line: The DA isn't letting this drop and Jason Chen and Gizmodo/Gawker have plenty to worry about in the meantime.

Mark
 

Scooterman1

macrumors 6502a
May 15, 2008
939
12
Houston, Tx
My thoughts on this turn of events: The district attorney is going to extraordinary lengths to preserve the integrity of the investigation. There's no way in hell that he'd spend the time and money on this if he wasn't pretty certain he'd have some charges to file at the other end.

Bottom line: The DA isn't letting this drop and Jason Chen and Gizmodo/Gawker have plenty to worry about in the meantime.

Mark

I think it's the clout of Apple that is pushing this to the end...... NOT the DA.
The DA is probably just a puppet in this case. Apple wants blood and to set an example.

And I think they should push it so hard, that the entire pool of Journalists don't write free publicity for Apple in the future. Stop all coverage....
But, that won't happen........
 

Will do good

macrumors 6502a
Mar 24, 2010
658
359
Earth
I agreed with Steve, you can't "let it slide". We need to have rules and people to follow them. Think about New York's "Broken window effect".
 

Tones2

macrumors 65816
Jan 8, 2009
1,471
0
That's our justice system. They need a "Special Master" and two months to read through one guys computer information. You could probably get a 12 year old to do it better in a couple of days.

Yes. Our tax dollars hard at work!

Tony
 

Scooterman1

macrumors 6502a
May 15, 2008
939
12
Houston, Tx
That's our justice system. They need a "Special Master" and two months to read through one guys computer information. You could probably get a 12 year old to do it better in a couple of days.

Yes. Our tax dollars hard at work!

Tony

It may be a 12 year old. They said he's unpaid, and the DA's office won't use Child Labor.... :)
 

ValSalva

macrumors 68040
Jun 26, 2009
3,778
252
Burpelson AFB
This may not result in a criminal case but the evidence will come in handy in a civil suit. Gawker may be writing a big check to Apple because of this.
 

whatever

macrumors 6502a
Dec 12, 2001
880
0
South of Boston, MA
I guess California doesn't have real crimes to investigate :rolleyes:

What are you talking about.

Why would you not consider this a "real crime".

If you felt that someone stole from you and there is mounting evidence of a crime would you not want justice?

California is doing the right thing.
 

Scooterman1

macrumors 6502a
May 15, 2008
939
12
Houston, Tx
If this whole thing has hurt Apple in some way, then I agree with prosecuting them.
However, I believe that Apple received much more free media on this than what it has cost them. And did it really cost them?

What I don't agree with is SJ in going after them just because he's pouting over losing the secrecy of surprise at WWDC.

I really think this secrecy thing is very childish when carried to SJ's extreme.
 

LostPacket

macrumors member
Jun 26, 2003
56
0
Canada, eh
That's our justice system. They need a "Special Master" and two months to read through one guys computer information. You could probably get a 12 year old to do it better in a couple of days.

Yes. Our tax dollars hard at work!

It will probably take 2 months because the guy is unpaid. Your tax dollars are being wasted, just not here.
 

s8film40

macrumors 6502
Aug 14, 2007
480
41
If this whole thing has hurt Apple in some way, then I agree with prosecuting them.
However, I believe that Apple received much more free media on this than what it has cost them. And did it really cost them?

What I don't agree with is SJ in going after them just because he's pouting over losing the secrecy of surprise at WWDC.

I really think this secrecy thing is very childish when carried to SJ's extreme.

In a market as competitive as the mobile phone market, secrecy is very important. Allowing your competition to see your product a few months out can make a huge difference. There are many ways Apple could go with the new iPhone, now every other mobile manufacturer out there knows what Apple is planning and can plan their strategies and products early giving them an advantage they wouldn't have otherwise had. So yes this is a big deal, a very real crime, and a legitimate concern on Apple's part.
 

ValSalva

macrumors 68040
Jun 26, 2009
3,778
252
Burpelson AFB
That's our justice system. They need a "Special Master" and two months to read through one guys computer information. You could probably get a 12 year old to do it better in a couple of days.

Yes. Our tax dollars hard at work!

Tony

I'm sure Apple pays its share of tax dollars. Thus if this investigation is being based on financial worthiness, it's cost effective. The community is a much better place with Apple being there paying taxes. Taxes that far outweigh how much the investigation costs.
 

ThePimento

macrumors member
Apr 26, 2010
35
54
Texas
If this whole thing has hurt Apple in some way, then I agree with prosecuting them.
However, I believe that Apple received much more free media on this than what it has cost them. And did it really cost them?

What I don't agree with is SJ in going after them just because he's pouting over losing the secrecy of surprise at WWDC.

I really think this secrecy thing is very childish when carried to SJ's extreme.

Oh give me a break. Apple is the one company everyone tries to imitate. Now the competition has a few months heads up on what's coming next in terms of the iPhone.

I hope Apple sues the hell out of Gawker. The stories they ran and what they called "journalism" is pathetic. They got their hits for the day and their one big "story." I would not care if they ceased to exist.
 

AppleGuy1980

macrumors member
Jun 7, 2008
56
0
What are you talking about.

Why would you not consider this a "real crime".

If you felt that someone stole from you and there is mounting evidence of a crime would you not want justice?

California is doing the right thing.

The iPhone was NOT stolen. It was lost. That Jason Chen paid for it is, well, unfortunate for him, but I for one do not believe a crime has been committed.

The government of California should not use the mighty arm of the law to enforce Apple's bizzarre obsession with keeping its products secret. If Apple wants thing perfectly secret, it can restrict access, etc., but it should not rely on the threat of prosecuting journalists acting in the public interest to keep its products safe.

Chen, one might say, is a latter day Daniel Ellsberg while Apple is CLEARLY a repressive force fighting the 1st Amendment.
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.