Battery Cycle Count Almost 1000

Discussion in 'MacBook Air' started by LadyX, Jul 21, 2013.

  1. LadyX macrumors 68020

    LadyX

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2012
    #1
    My 11-inch MBA's battery cycle count is 820 with a normal condition. In the case of the MBA (mid 2011), the maximum cycle count is 1000 before the battery is considered consumed. Do I replace the battery now or wait till it reaches its limit? And how do I go about replacing the battery? Apple has a guide but it doesn't show how to install the battery on a MacBook Air http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2037
     
  2. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #2
    I'd look at how the battery performs more then battery cycles. Too many users get obsessed over what the cycle count is. If you have over 1,000 but yet it holds a charge, then why replace it.

    My point is as it ages, the battery will deteriorate - wait until it gets to a point where you are not willing to live with it any longer
     
  3. LadyX thread starter macrumors 68020

    LadyX

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2012
    #3
    Battery Cycle Count Almost 1000

    With a full charge, my MacBook Air lasts 1-3 hours.
     
  4. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    Location:
    Boston
    #4
    Apple advertised a 7 hour battery for the 2011 MBAs though few people really saw this (unlike the new 2013 MBAs) . I'd say as long as you're not running flash or you've had better battery life in the past, its time for a new battery.
     
  5. gnasher729 macrumors P6

    gnasher729

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    #5
    The battery may not be user replacable.

    The "1000 cycles" is not an absolute limit. Some last longer, some last less long. It's like a car dealer telling you "this car should last about 180,000 miles"; you wouldn't dump it when you reach that mileage, you dump it when it stops working.

    As far as I know, these batteries degrade very slowly over a long time (may be up to 950, may be 1050, may be more or less), and suddenly degrade very quickly after that. You replace it when it doesn't last long enough for your taste or needs. I had a MacBook that ran for two years connected to power with a battery that lasted about a minute; it worked just fine.
     
  6. MBHockey macrumors 68040

    MBHockey

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2003
    Location:
    New York
    #6
    the 11" was rated at 5 hours not 7
     
  7. Mlrollin91 macrumors G4

    Mlrollin91

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    Location:
    Ventura County
    #7
    When you battery health percentage is less than 80% its time to replace the battery. Technically the battery is rated for 1000 charges before it drops below 80% health, but other factors come into play as well. I've seen some batteries get 1200 charges before dropping below 80% and others dropping below 80% after 250 charges. Just how the battery is maintained or if its defective or not.
     
  8. scaredpoet macrumors 604

    scaredpoet

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    #8
    That's completely wrong. There is no "maximum cycle count." What Apple DOES say is that the battery is "designed to deliver up to 1000 full charge and discharge cycles before it reaches 80 percent of its original capacity."

    80 percent does not equal "consumed."

    If the battery is still working on your laptop, then there's no reason to replace it.
     
  9. LadyX thread starter macrumors 68020

    LadyX

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2012
    #9
    Battery Cycle Count Almost 1000

    I saw the table here: http://support.apple.com/kb/ht1519


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk 2
     
  10. scaredpoet macrumors 604

    scaredpoet

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    #10
    Not true either. Apple will replace a battery if it falls below 80% capacity before the 1,000 cycle mark within the warranty period. But if you're at 80% or below, it's a purely a personal choice (and purely a personal expense) whether you want the battery replaced or not.

    ----------


    "You can use your battery after it reaches its maximum cycle count, but you may notice a reduction in your battery life."

    "Consumed" is pretty much an academic term. It probably relates more to warranty repair decisions than anything else.

    If you want to replace it, go ahead. But if it's still got more than 80% capacity on it, or if it's continuing to work fine for you, then it's just wasted money and added risk that someone will mar up the casing to get at the internal battery.
     
  11. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #11
    Is not required that you replace the battery when the cycles exceed 1000 or the battery health drops below 80%. As long as the battery holds sufficient charge to meet your needs, it is not necessary to replace the battery. Many still use batteries with over 1000 cycles, or with under 80% health, with no issues whatsoever. The only thing you need to watch out for is battery swelling, which could damage your Mac if it occurs. As long as that's not happening, it's perfectly fine to use a battery beyond the rated cycles or below the targeted health.

    The link below should answer most, if not all, of your battery/charging questions. If you haven't already done so, I highly recommend you take the time to read it.
     
  12. LadyX thread starter macrumors 68020

    LadyX

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2012
    #12
    Oh that's good to know. Thanks!

    Will make sure to read it. Thank you!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk 2
     
  13. mattferg macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 27, 2013
    #13
    Speaking of which, what is the warranty position on this? At any point while you have valid AppleCare, if your charge cycle is over 1000 and it doesn't hold a charge any more, do they replace the battery for free?
     
  14. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #14
    As they warrant that the battery should retain up to 80% of its capacity up to 1000 cycles, if it's over 1000 cycles, they wouldn't have to replace it under warranty/AppleCare. After all, batteries are consumable items and Apple doesn't replace them free, unless they are defective. If they're simply depleted from use, it's the user's responsibility to replace them.
     

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