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iPhone X Battery Health dropping fast on replacement device

Mesut

macrumors member
Original poster
Apr 8, 2015
30
15
My old iPhone X was replaced under warranty and the replacement unit had a new battery with 100% health. After about ~30 cycles it's already down to 98% in just over a month. Please take a look at the info from coconutBattery below. Is this abnormal or is it because of iOS 12?

Old phone:
Screen Shot 2019-01-01 at 11.21.40 PM.png

Replacement:
Screen Shot 2019-01-01 at 11.21.52 PM.png
 
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bimmahh

macrumors member
Feb 12, 2011
66
20
FWIW...

I had two phones replaced under the battery program, an SE and 6S. Both have ~30 cycles on them and both are ~99- 97% health already. The SE is on 10.3.3 and the 6S is on 12.1.1
 
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aakshey

macrumors 68030
Jun 13, 2016
2,632
1,126
My old iPhone X was replaced under warranty and the replacement unit had a new battery with 100% health. After about ~30 cycles it's already down to 98% in just over a month. Please take a look at the info from coconutBattery below. Is this abnormal or is it because of iOS 12?

Old phone:
View attachment 813526

Replacement:
View attachment 813527

Got nothing to do with iOS 12.

Seems like it will degrade to sub 80% level in a few months.
 
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C DM

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Oct 17, 2011
50,852
19,028
Got nothing to do with iOS 12.

Seems like it will degrade to sub 80% level in a few months.
Considering it's not a linear progression, that the ratings are estimates based on some chemical and other readings, and a lot of it depends on usage and so forth, it really doesn't mean that anything will happen in a few months one way or another.
 
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ImAnAgent

Suspended
Oct 11, 2018
273
212
My mind
Could be your own fault, if you let the new one discharge below 20% often or leave it in the cold/hot car more often. Just too many variables to blame it on the battery alone.
I wish this myth would go away.

I let every single phone that I have ever owned drop down to 5% before I charge them and have never had a battery degrade from it. This goes back to my very first phone in 1993.

My 7+ battery still shows 96% after 120 charge cycles, my 8+ is 97.1 after 101 cycles and my iPad mini 2 is at 95% after 150 cycles.

If anything, my stats show that discharging down to 5% helps the battery.
 
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AppleHaterLover

macrumors 68020
Jun 15, 2018
2,040
2,044
I wish this myth would go away.

I let every single phone that I have ever owned drop down to 5% before I charge them and have never had a battery degrade from it. This goes back to my very first phone in 1993.

My 7+ battery still shows 96% after 120 charge cycles, my 8+ is 97.1 after 101 cycles and my iPad mini 2 is at 95% after 150 cycles.

If anything, my stats show that discharging down to 5% helps the battery.

Are you serious??????

Comparing wear on nickel batteries from 25 years ago with modern lithium ion/polymer batteries is absurd. Zero credit.

Also - 5 minutes of research shows that it’s best to NOT let your battery drop to zero. Generally batteries last their longest if kept around 40-80% charge.


Regarding OP’s post, battery wear is not linear, and the battery health indicator’s reading is not set in stone.
 
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ImAnAgent

Suspended
Oct 11, 2018
273
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Are you serious??????

Comparing wear on nickel batteries from 25 years ago with modern lithium ion/polymer batteries is absurd. Zero credit.

Also - 5 minutes of research shows that it’s best to NOT let your battery drop to zero. Generally batteries last their longest if kept around 40-80% charge.


Regarding OP’s post, battery wear is not linear, and the battery health indicator’s reading is not set in stone.
Of course I'm serious. Forget the batteries from 25 years ago. My stats from the last few iPhones clearly shows discharging down to 5% before charging had no ill effects on the battery.
 
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C DM

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Oct 17, 2011
50,852
19,028
Are you serious??????

Comparing wear on nickel batteries from 25 years ago with modern lithium ion/polymer batteries is absurd. Zero credit.

Also - 5 minutes of research shows that it’s best to NOT let your battery drop to zero. Generally batteries last their longest if kept around 40-80% charge.


Regarding OP’s post, battery wear is not linear, and the battery health indicator’s reading is not set in stone.
It's certainly best, but then the question is it actually bad (and more so noticeably bad) to go outside the "best" range, or it it simply more that it's just not "best" anymore but still a ways off from anything even close to bad.
 
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ImAnAgent

Suspended
Oct 11, 2018
273
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It's certainly best, but then the question is it actually bad (and more so noticeably bad) to go outside the "best" range, or it it simply more that it's just not "best" anymore but still a ways off from anything even close to bad.
If it's bad to let the battery get below 20%, the effects are certainly not noticeable.

I also bought a XS Max in late October that has 23 cycles on it and is still at 100%. Every iPhone and Android phone I have, I only charge it once it gets to 5% and sometimes below that if I didn't catch it at 5%.
 
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Mesut

macrumors member
Original poster
Apr 8, 2015
30
15
I talked to Apple Support; they ran diagnostics and said the battery is fine. I started turning the phone off overnight every 2 days and also decided to charge it only after it goes below 20%.

Regarding OP’s post, battery wear is not linear, and the battery health indicator’s reading is not set in stone.
Considering it's not a linear progression, that the ratings are estimates based on some chemical and other readings, and a lot of it depends on usage and so forth, it really doesn't mean that anything will happen in a few months one way or another.

coconutBattery says the capacity is 99% again but iOS still shows 98% so you got that right.

Screen Shot 2019-01-06 at 2.36.00 PM.png
 
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Shadowbech

macrumors 603
Oct 18, 2011
6,478
2,644
That means that you generate a lot of charging cycles which is even worse than letting it go down to 20%...
No, you are generating a lot of charging cycles if you run it down from 100% to 20% then from 100% to 50%.
 
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BLBL

macrumors 6502a
Apr 11, 2018
994
146
What is your phone serial numbers first two letters and what are first two letters in battery serial number? Also check battery manufacturing date. You can check the battery serial number with iMazing (for Windows, even free versions shows battery health information where also battery serial and manufacturing date is listed).
 
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C DM

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Oct 17, 2011
50,852
19,028
That means that you generate a lot of charging cycles which is even worse than letting it go down to 20%...

No, you are generating a lot of charging cycles if you run it down from 100% to 20% then from 100% to 50%.
You aren't generating any more one way or another. You generate more if you use up more battery in general, regardless of when you charge it up.
 
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AlexJoda

macrumors 6502a
Apr 8, 2015
768
592
100% to 0% - 1

100% to 50% - 0.5

100% to 90% - 0.1

And so on.

When that is the case you are right. Always thought that charging to 100% regardless from where counts as a charging cycle....
 
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C DM

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Oct 17, 2011
50,852
19,028
When that is the case you are right. Always thought that charging to 100% regardless from where counts as a charging cycle....
It's the percentage of charge itself. Charging 5 times from 40% to 60% would be a cycle too, even though you never even get close to charging to 100%.
 
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AlexJoda

macrumors 6502a
Apr 8, 2015
768
592
It's the percentage of charge itself. Charging 5 times from 40% to 60% would be a cycle too, even though you never even get close to charging to 100%.

Ok, that makes sense....Maybe they should show the charging cycles as decimal fractions (eg. 10.6), than this would be clear....
 
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Mesut

macrumors member
Original poster
Apr 8, 2015
30
15
The question is what counts as a charging cycle....

https://www.apple.com/batteries/why-lithium-ion
[doublepost=1547531394][/doublepost]
What is your phone serial numbers first two letters and what are first two letters in battery serial number? Also check battery manufacturing date. You can check the battery serial number with iMazing (for Windows, even free versions shows battery health information where also battery serial and manufacturing date is listed).

Thank you.

First two letters of phone's serial number: GH
First two letters of battery's serial number: F8 (via iMazing)
Battery manufacture date: Y833 (via iMazing)
Phone manufacture date: 1st Oct 2018 (via coconutBattery)

Can you decode "Y833"?
 
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watakoola

macrumors regular
Aug 23, 2010
182
131
Australia
Meanwhile, in the real world...

My SE gets down to either a maximum of around 20% or a minimum of around 12% on a daily basis because I use the damn thing and don't have chargers handy when out and about.

I'd love to have my iPhone hovering around 50% battery life all the time, but in actual usage that just doesn't happen for me.
 
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