Best HDD Manufacturers in 2016?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by Texas_Toast, Feb 7, 2016.

  1. Texas_Toast macrumors 6502

    Texas_Toast

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2016
    Location:
    Texas
    #1
    What are the best HDD manufacturers in 2016?

    For years I was a loyal Seagate person, but when I bought my MacBook Pro in 2013, I had heard that Seagate was having lots of issues with their HDDs. Maybe this was related to the hurricane or tsunami in the Philippines or wherever?

    At any rate, I didn't want to chance it, so based on recommendations I tried Western Digital, and my HDD is still standing up 3 years later - although it is full.

    Even though I back up my Mac, it would still be catastrophic to have a new HDD go out, so I am cautious about what I buy.

    I need at least a 1TB HDD to meet my storage needs.

    When I do this search on NewEgg, it is barely pulling up any results, and I don't see Western Digital at all?!

    Size: 1TB and larger
    Speed: 7500rpm
    Form Factor: 2.5"

    I'm not sure why this is so hard? Maybe because nobody uses conventional HDDs anymore?

    Sincerely,


    Larry
     
  2. MrAverigeUser, Feb 7, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2016

    MrAverigeUser macrumors 6502a

    MrAverigeUser

    Joined:
    May 20, 2015
    Location:
    europe
    #2
    if reliability and low noise is your high priority:
    Before the SSD-era Toshiba HDD were one of the best (and fast either) available. 10 years ago they were high-tech and I can nothing other than recommend them to you.
    The H200 is the last one and perhaps the most performing 2,5" on the market now. It´s a "learning" hybrid HDD.
    samsung was told to be also one of the best, but they have just stopped production of HDD in late 2015..

    Seagate was never top. But "cheap". At the moment they are facing a class lawsuit procedure for their 3 TB HDDs failing too often...
     
  3. Texas_Toast thread starter macrumors 6502

    Texas_Toast

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2016
    Location:
    Texas
    #3
    Interesting reply. I wonder if your experience is different because you are in Europe? In the 1990s and early 2000s, I think Seagate was the best manufacturer of HDD. And Western Digital was one of the worst - only to be outdone by IBM DeathStars! Then apparently Seagate went downhill and Western Digital improved some, circa 2013.

    Does anyone else have modern experience with HDDs and manufacturers?

    Truth be told, I will likely buy a new MacBook later this year, and I will learn how to go SSD. But for now, I want a quick - yet reliable - solution for my current MBP. I think a 1TB HDD would be the quickest way to meet my growing data needs, but I don't want to buy a lemon!

    Sincerely,


    Larry
     
  4. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Location:
    The Finger Lakes Region
  5. Texas_Toast thread starter macrumors 6502

    Texas_Toast

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2016
    Location:
    Texas
    #5
  6. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Location:
    The Finger Lakes Region
    #6
  7. Texas_Toast thread starter macrumors 6502

    Texas_Toast

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2016
    Location:
    Texas
    #7
    LOL

    My #1 concern is stability. Can I get a similar HDD that is 2TB, 3TB, or 4TB in a 2.5" HDD that is s-t-a-b-l-e?? (I wasn't even sure if 2.5" 1TB HDD were stable yet? Then again, it looks like I am behind the times...)

    Sincerely,


    Larry
     
  8. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Location:
    The Finger Lakes Region
    #8
    The 2TB is quite stable!
     
  9. throAU macrumors 601

    throAU

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2012
    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
    #9
    Most of the big hard drive manufacturers make good drives these days. Someone always has some horror story with brand X, but that's because a small number of all of them do fail.
     
  10. \-V-/ Suspended

    \-V-/

    Joined:
    May 3, 2012
    #10
    Every hard drive can just randomly die ... regardless of brand. You're not going to get 100% stability with any company. If you want "stability" then you're gonna want to have backups for your data. HDDs do just randomly "go out" ... whether it's the first day you use it ... a few weeks from now ... or a few years ... HDDs are not infallible. I've used every brand of HDD out there and they've all gone out at random times. The only peace of mind you can really have is backing up your data. I would invest in something like Carbon Copy Cloner ... that way if bad joojoo happens you can have a bootable drive ready to go in the event of a drive failure ... and have additional back ups as well. They say any data you care about you should back up at least twice. I've lost data enough times from being unprepared to never lose data again. Some things are just too important to toy around with.

    If you really just want a plain answer, then Western Digital and Toshiba are good bets.
     
  11. Alrescha macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2008
    #11
    We will not know the answer to this until 2016 is over :)

    As others have said, you can not make very good predictions about single drives. On the other hand, you can collect data about lots of drives and make historical observations. Of course there is no guarantee that the future will behave like the past.

    Backblaze has experience with lots of drives and lots of manufacturers. They publish their data:

    https://www.backblaze.com/blog/hard-drive-reliability-q3-2015

    A.
     
  12. MrAverigeUser macrumors 6502a

    MrAverigeUser

    Joined:
    May 20, 2015
    Location:
    europe
    #12

    A friend of mine was already at that time responsible for a big IT-dpt with enormous storage and lots of Laptops/Notebooks..
    I asked for his recommendations for 2,5" HDDs already before and had good experience then with the Toshibas. I remember now that he also proposed Hitachi.
    He hated Seagate because they posed always much more problems than other HDDs.
    Now I recall that - three years ago - I demanded again his tip for exchange some 3,5" HDDs in my NAS for higher capacities. he recommended one western digital type and warned me about an other disk type from WD at the same time, which failed far too often.
    Evidently, it is not always a question of brand, there seem to be also significant differences between products of the same brand.
    As for SSDs, I was one of the tens of thousands of victims of the OCZ 160GB (early SSDs) Never ever OCZ….
    But no problem ever with samsung 840.

    As for "new" MBPs:
    You should think twice: I have one of the last produced unsoldered MBP (assembled late 2013). You can save a LOT of money with a good 2012 15" model (USB 3.0 and TB connectivity) second hand from a careful owner which gets a very fast machine if you upgrade yourself with 3rd party RAM/SSD…. and you have either still optical bay OR space for a second SATA III Disk (HDD or SSD)...
     
  13. Jonathon71 Suspended

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2014
    #13
    Even the smallest portable hard drive you’ll likely find today will be 500GB in size, which is enough space to hold around 2000 CD albums in decent lossless FLAC format, or twice that number in lower quality MP3 or AAC format. Off-loading your music collection alone from a computer to a portable drive can be a godsend in freeing valuable space if your laptop has limited SSD storage, for example.

    Another popular application of a portable hard drive is for keeping critical backups of your data held on a PC or laptop. You may be able to keep a perfect clone of your entire computer’s internal drive, on standby and ready in the event that the computer is lost or its drive should malfunction. Alternatively, you may choose just to back up the most important files and documents from your user libraries, such as text documents, photos, films, music and stored email. Some portable drives include software that can help automate this process, keeping your selected directories in sync whenever you plug in the drive or by a daily schedule.

    Best portable hard drives: Performance
    Now that USB 2.0 has been banished from all self-respecting storage, we find USB 3.0 as the standard for connection, letting these portable drives perform as quickly as the little disks inside will allow.

    This means that when transferring your music or video collection to or from your PC, you can expect around 100MB/s read speed (and typically the same for writing, since unlike flash storage technology the read and write speeds tend to be more symmetrical). Compare this with the older drives using USB 2.0, which would limit speeds to around 35MB/s, or only one-third the speed. So in real terms, your 100GB of media files would take close to an hour to transfer with USB 2.0, or under 20 minutes using USB 3.0.

    If you’re likely to be storing or backing up many small files, be aware that overall performance will plummet since hard disks tend to choke on smaller files. So while large files may zip across at 100MB/s, the smallest will likely travel at less than 1MB/s, or one hundredth that speed.

    Best portable hard drives: Protection
    A rugged exterior will be handy if you want the freedom of being able to throw around the unplugged drive with less worry that it will damage the unit; and more importantly lose your data.

    Look out for shock-resistance ratings such as the US military MIL-STD-810F 516.5 (Transit Drop Test). This means that it should withstand being dropped 26 times onto a hard floor, once on to each face, edge and corner, from a height of 1.22m.

    The drive does not need to be switched on to pass - we don’t believe any hard disk would survive that test – and nor does it require independent verification before a manufacturer can promote its product as ‘milspec shock-resistant’. But the rating is an indication that the manufacturer has probably taken more care in nurturing the delicate disk inside.

    Best portable hard drives: Extras
    Besides the drive itself, you can expect to find more extras included with the product. A slip-on case or even just a simple cloth pouch can prove invaluable, letting you store the drive in the bottom of a laptop or handbag without it collecting scratches and dents - or in the case of metal-cased storage drives, of leaving scratches and dents on everything around it.

    At least one USB cable will be included, and you may find additional Y-cables that allow you to piggyback more power from a neighbouring USB port. This is mandatory for some portable drives, which demand more power than a single USB port can provide, for example.

    Best portable hard drives: Value
    For many users, a portable storage drive may be an unavoidable commodity, and price will be the deciding factor. We give a value rating based on how much each gigabyte of storage is costing you for each drive. Particularly with the largest 2TB drive, you can expect to find storage for under 5p per gigabyte now.

    Best portable hard drives: Security
    The larger the drive, the more you can store - and the more you stand to lose in the event of losing the drive or having it stolen. This is where it pays to lock down that drive.

    There are two ways to ensure the data is unreadable by other users. You can scramble the contents through hardware encryption. Or you can use a software application to encrypt either parts or all of the drive.
     
  14. Texas_Toast thread starter macrumors 6502

    Texas_Toast

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2016
    Location:
    Texas
    #14
    Your comments inspired a new thread here...
    http://forums.macrumors.com/threads/new-vs-older-macbookpros.1955076/
     

Share This Page