Best way to prevent or block spam mail ?

max2

macrumors 68030
Original poster
May 31, 2015
2,788
517
I know never give your email address out but lets say the person already did. Is it still possible to prevent or block spam mail ? Or should they start over with a new email ?
 

dontwalkhand

macrumors 603
Jul 5, 2007
5,176
1,182
I know never give your email address out but lets say the person already did. Is it still possible to prevent or block spam mail ? Or should they start over with a new email ?
On the Mac, start moving things to the junk folder in Mail.app

On the iPhone same thing, start moving things to the junk folder and it’ll train the system.

Now nary a lick of spam
 

GlenK

macrumors 6502a
Aug 1, 2013
759
164
St. Augustine, FL
There used to be an email address that you forwarded spam. Is there still such an address? I'm getting more and more phishing email for fake Apple information.
 

Scepticalscribe

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Jul 29, 2008
45,381
30,656
The Far Horizon
When I had Windows computers, I was plagued with endless spam, phishing, viruses, and other unwanted and unwelcome visitors.

The free antivirus and spam stuff available online was completely inadequate, so I actually bought the most robust versions that I could (Kaspersky, Norton); that wasn't much better.

In truth, the problem almost (not entirely) disappeared once I switched to the Apple ecosystem a little over a decade ago.
 
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C DM

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Oct 17, 2011
47,446
15,984
When I had Windows computers, I was plagued with endless spam, phishing, viruses, and other unwanted and unwelcome visitors.

The free antivirus and spam stuff available online was completely inadequate, so I actually bought the most robust versions that I could (Kaspersky, Norton); that wasn't much better.

In truth, the problem almost (not entirely) disappeared once I switched to the Apple ecosystem a little over a decade ago.
Odd, never really had any more or less of any of those things (and in particular spam/phishing, given that's not really related to OS) whether I used Windows or Mac. Perhaps some other variables played more of a role.
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There used to be an email address that you forwarded spam. Is there still such an address? I'm getting more and more phishing email for fake Apple information.
https://www.apple.com/ca/legal/more-resources/phishing/ might be of some help when it comes to that.
 
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NoBoMac

Moderator
Staff member
Jul 1, 2014
2,459
881
Also depends on the mail service. Some are better than others re: filtering spam.

My case, I use Gmail, and their spam filtering is really good: rarely get a spam email that sneaks through to the Inbox. Did run into a time where, for some odd reason, Gmail was allowing through tons of spam from a couple of domains that were being used by Indian spammers (since plugged or they went dark), and while that was going on, I setup an email filter to move to Trash anything coming from the bad domains.

Most desktop mail clients have ability to set rules, so, can set rules to filter spam locally.

Last thing I'd do is get rid of an email address, especially if had for a long time. Spam has always been a thing and will continue to be a thing. No escaping it, just can minimize it.
 

monokakata

macrumors 68000
May 8, 2008
1,861
382
Hilo, Hawai'i
Iʻve been very happy with SpamSieve, although itʻs not free.

One or two spam emails sneak through every week.

One problem is that "train as good" doesnʻt always work; I have a handful of newsletters that routinely get flagged as spam and I have to unflag them. They are all scientific . . . not sure why that happens.
 

GeraldBostock

macrumors newbie
Dec 13, 2018
5
3
Solar Federation
When I had Windows computers, I was plagued with endless spam, phishing, viruses, and other unwanted and unwelcome visitors.

The free antivirus and spam stuff available online was completely inadequate, so I actually bought the most robust versions that I could (Kaspersky, Norton); that wasn't much better.

In truth, the problem almost (not entirely) disappeared once I switched to the Apple ecosystem a little over a decade ago.
I mean no disrespect but in a lot of cases, problems in Windows come from the user itself - more precisely bad surfing habits and being unaware of traps and such.

I had switched to Macs in 2008 but I switched back to Windows in 2016. I've not had more (or at all, really) viruses or spam or malware or phishing since coming back to Windows. Now I'm not saying it's impossible to get infected, just that being careful in the first place is the best practice. No matter what system you use.
 

Scepticalscribe

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Jul 29, 2008
45,381
30,656
The Far Horizon
I mean no disrespect but in a lot of cases, problems in Windows come from the user itself - more precisely bad surfing habits and being unaware of traps and such.

I had switched to Macs in 2008 but I switched back to Windows in 2016. I've not had more (or at all, really) viruses or spam or malware or phishing since coming back to Windows. Now I'm not saying it's impossible to get infected, just that being careful in the first place is the best practice. No matter what system you use.
Perhaps.

However, while I had a Windows system, I was plagued with spam, and nothing I did seemed to have an effect, whereas that has not been the case since I switched to the Apple ecosystem.
 

jeyf

macrumors 65816
Jan 20, 2009
1,187
540
bet your parents had the same phone# for years.
change?
every once in a while cycle your id's:
-new credit card#, new cking account#
-change your phone#, its free if you do it online
-get a small POBox and move things like voter registration to it
-if you post a cragislist with your phhone# get the ios Burner app
-cycle your emails too
-wifiSpoof app and a offshore vpn
-use your bank's bill pay
 

C DM

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Oct 17, 2011
47,446
15,984
bet your parents had the same phone# for years.
change?
every once in a while cycle your id's:
-new credit card#, new cking account#
-change your phone#, its free if you do it online
-get a small POBox and move things like voter registration to it
-if you post a cragislist with your phhone# get the ios Burner app
-cycle your emails too
-wifiSpoof app and a offshore vpn
-use your bank's bill pay
Seems like that presents a lot of hassle and work to change most of those things. Changing your address or phone number or email means you have to update those things in many places where you use them and let others know and make it a hassle for them too to update. It's not all that practical really to do that on some sort of a regular basis, or even more than once in a rare while if there are some circumstances that might really require it.
 
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jeyf

macrumors 65816
Jan 20, 2009
1,187
540
... It's not all that practical really to do that on some sort of a regular basis.
yes it is possible to do it easy fast.
-I pay all my bills, taxes, utilities, etc via a 3rd party; bank bill pay.
-Credit cards are handled really nice; they append your current charges to the new card number and you continue getting un interrupted monthly statements.
-It is not like anyone remembers phone numbers any more so if i change my phone# i send out a mass text to peeps to update their contacts. ATT allows you to change phone#'s online no cost.
-i use a PO Box instead of my home address. the post office lets you reference your box like "suite 1234" where 1234 is your box#. Just fwd my mail to a new box# when it becomes available at the local post office.

if someone really wants to find you they will, likely it is not because you won the lottery.

now i look at my messages and i only see what I need to know and quickly. No one calls me un less we really want to talk.
 

Huntn

macrumors demi-god
May 5, 2008
17,031
16,491
The Misty Mountains
When I had Windows computers, I was plagued with endless spam, phishing, viruses, and other unwanted and unwelcome visitors.

The free antivirus and spam stuff available online was completely inadequate, so I actually bought the most robust versions that I could (Kaspersky, Norton); that wasn't much better.

In truth, the problem almost (not entirely) disappeared once I switched to the Apple ecosystem a little over a decade ago.
A friend of ours, when we lived close, used to have me look at her PC computer because through normal surfing, it was inundated with malware, adware, pop up windows, a frick’n nightmare. Besides switching to a different browser from Explorer, I used several programs designed for these threats. I remember seeing thousands of being removed. Can these numbers be believed or ar they inflated by the cleaning program, I don’t know. Now maybe Explorer has improved since then, but that single step of picking a better browser, had a significant impact.

On my PC, I use Bit Defender, and MalwareBytes, plus I use Firefox or Chome browsers and do no email on this computer.

I agree, on my Mac it’s a better ecosystem. For email, I use Google Mail on Safari, and spam is limited and mostly automatically handled.

Of possible interest, on my Mac I abandoned Firefox, because Safari is more efficient with the miserly 8gb Ram I have installed.
 

SDColorado

Contributor
Nov 6, 2011
4,266
4,208
Highlands Ranch, CO
Iʻve been very happy with SpamSieve, although itʻs not free.

One or two spam emails sneak through every week.

One problem is that "train as good" doesnʻt always work; I have a handful of newsletters that routinely get flagged as spam and I have to unflag them. They are all scientific . . . not sure why that happens.
Have you posted on their forums or reached out to Michael Tsai about this issue? I am sure it can be resolved.


 

SDColorado

Contributor
Nov 6, 2011
4,266
4,208
Highlands Ranch, CO
I believe the best way is to create spam filter to block them.
I find that the most effective in many cases as well. I will make a rule such as "If From content contains Viagra, move message to mailbox trash. That way I don't even have to bother moving them from junk to trash.

It isn't as simple as the Block feature in Outlook, but it works.