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jwolf6589

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Dec 15, 2010
3,816
904
Colorado
I have a Best Buy Credit Card. I am gonna make a proposal to landlord to pay half the price of a WIFI 6 router as our current router is only WIFI 5. As mentioned in other threads I am having issues with present router not only on my ATV but on my Mac as well. I don't use my iPhone enough at home to tell if the issue is there as well. On the Mac the connection drops often and Mac reconnects. Landlord is all Windows/Android and claims to not have any problems so if he is not convinced I may be paying for a new router all alone. So is this a good router? We both stream video often so we need a multimedia router.

 

bozzykid

macrumors 68020
Aug 11, 2009
2,233
267
There's really no "best router". It really depends on your situation (building layout, devices being used, etc).
 

Prorege1

macrumors regular
Jun 21, 2020
202
241
I have a Best Buy Credit Card. I am gonna make a proposal to landlord to pay half the price of a WIFI 6 router as our current router is only WIFI 5. As mentioned in other threads I am having issues with present router not only on my ATV but on my Mac as well. I don't use my iPhone enough at home to tell if the issue is there as well. On the Mac the connection drops often and Mac reconnects. Landlord is all Windows/Android and claims to not have any problems so if he is not convinced I may be paying for a new router all alone. So is this a good router? We both stream video often so we need a multimedia router.

You may have a low signal strength from your landlord's centrally placed WiFi router which can cause your issues, if that's the case a mesh WiFi system with multiple access points may help, we use Google WiFi to expand the range in our house.

To check the signal strength download the free app on your MacBook "WiFi Explorer Lite".

64A07AEB-CC49-4D77-849A-AEE3E41B1BF2.png
 
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jwolf6589

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Dec 15, 2010
3,816
904
Colorado
You may have a low signal strength from your landlord's centrally placed WiFi router which can cause your issues, if that's the case a mesh WiFi system with multiple access points may help, we use Google WiFi to expand the range in our house.

To check the signal strength download the free app on your MacBook "WiFi Explorer Lite".

View attachment 2021509
Strange both MacBook and ATV report strong signal strength.
 

w5jck

macrumors 65816
Nov 9, 2013
1,196
1,580
I still think your issue is most likely the location of your ATV 4K in relation to your landlord's router. If using ethernet, or the solution I suggested in the past, then distance and terrain is not an issue. If using Wi-Fi then they can be a huge issue. Darn nearly every modern electronic device these days uses BT and/or Wi-Fi to communicate, and they all create electrical signals which can interfere with radio waves. The household wiring system also creates interference. Walls, floors, ceilings, insulation, household items (especially metal ones) can all interfere with radio wave propagation. Because Wi-Fi is using 2G and/or 5G radio frequencies to communicate, all those other signals bouncing around the house can have an effect on them. I'm an Extra Class amateur radio operator (highest available license). Trying to deal with all the radio signals bouncing around the average home these days is a royal PITA.

So with all that interference, it will be hit and miss to get the Wi-Fi signals to work effeciently. You can move the router around a bit, or you can move the ATV 4K around a bit and hope the signal gets better, but it is like trying to tune in TV stations with a rabbit ears antenna inside of a house. It might work well one minute, then not at all the next. Every time someone moves around in the house, or whenever one device transmits, or when someone runs an appliance, et cetera there can be interference. Plus a lot of interference comes from outside the house as well. Even the Sun can cause major interference, not to mention cellular towers, overland electrical lines, other neighborhood houses. So just be aware that upgrading the router to Wi-Fi 6 from 5 may or may not resolve your issue. Mesh router systems are probably a better solution than the router he has now, but they tend to be expensive, and it still might not resolve the issue.

Before spending a lot of money on a new router, I would find someone to test out your landlord's internet service to find out if it is robust enough to even supply you with the levels you need. Ask around work and/or whatever people you hang out with to see if any of them or knowledgeable enough in home networks to take a look at your setup and see what might be the best solution. Almost all offices these days have IT people on staff, maybe one of them can give you some advice.
 
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jwolf6589

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Dec 15, 2010
3,816
904
Colorado
I still think your issue is most likely the location of your ATV 4K in relation to your landlord's router. If using ethernet, or the solution I suggested in the past, then distance and terrain is not an issue. If using Wi-Fi then they can be a huge issue. Darn nearly every modern electronic device these days uses BT and/or Wi-Fi to communicate, and they all create electrical signals which can interfere with radio waves. The household wiring system also creates interference. Walls, floors, ceilings, insulation, household items (especially metal ones) can all interfere with radio wave propagation. Because Wi-Fi is using 2G and/or 5G radio frequencies to communicate, all those other signals bouncing around the house can have an effect on them. I'm an Extra Class amateur radio operator (highest available license). Trying to deal with all the radio signals bouncing around the average home these days is a royal PITA.

So with all that interference, it will be hit and miss to get the Wi-Fi signals to work effeciently. You can move the router around a bit, or you can move the ATV 4K around a bit and hope the signal gets better, but it is like trying to tune in TV stations with a rabbit ears antenna inside of a house. It might work well one minute, then not at all the next. Every time someone moves around in the house, or whenever one device transmits, or when someone runs an appliance, et cetera there can be interference. Plus a lot of interference comes from outside the house as well. Even the Sun can cause major interference, not to mention cellular towers, overland electrical lines, other neighborhood houses. So just be aware that upgrading the router to Wi-Fi 6 from 5 may or may not resolve your issue. Mesh router systems are probably a better solution than the router he has now, but they tend to be expensive, and it still might not resolve the issue.

Before spending a lot of money on a new router, I would find someone to test out your landlord's internet service to find out if it is robust enough to even supply you with the levels you need. Ask around work and/or whatever people you hang out with to see if any of them or knowledgeable enough in home networks to take a look at your setup and see what might be the best solution. Almost all offices these days have IT people on staff, maybe one of them can give you some advice.
Okay should I buy an access point and use it in my room?
 

jwolf6589

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Dec 15, 2010
3,816
904
Colorado
I still think your issue is most likely the location of your ATV 4K in relation to your landlord's router. If using ethernet, or the solution I suggested in the past, then distance and terrain is not an issue. If using Wi-Fi then they can be a huge issue. Darn nearly every modern electronic device these days uses BT and/or Wi-Fi to communicate, and they all create electrical signals which can interfere with radio waves. The household wiring system also creates interference. Walls, floors, ceilings, insulation, household items (especially metal ones) can all interfere with radio wave propagation. Because Wi-Fi is using 2G and/or 5G radio frequencies to communicate, all those other signals bouncing around the house can have an effect on them. I'm an Extra Class amateur radio operator (highest available license). Trying to deal with all the radio signals bouncing around the average home these days is a royal PITA.

So with all that interference, it will be hit and miss to get the Wi-Fi signals to work effeciently. You can move the router around a bit, or you can move the ATV 4K around a bit and hope the signal gets better, but it is like trying to tune in TV stations with a rabbit ears antenna inside of a house. It might work well one minute, then not at all the next. Every time someone moves around in the house, or whenever one device transmits, or when someone runs an appliance, et cetera there can be interference. Plus a lot of interference comes from outside the house as well. Even the Sun can cause major interference, not to mention cellular towers, overland electrical lines, other neighborhood houses. So just be aware that upgrading the router to Wi-Fi 6 from 5 may or may not resolve your issue. Mesh router systems are probably a better solution than the router he has now, but they tend to be expensive, and it still might not resolve the issue.

Before spending a lot of money on a new router, I would find someone to test out your landlord's internet service to find out if it is robust enough to even supply you with the levels you need. Ask around work and/or whatever people you hang out with to see if any of them or knowledgeable enough in home networks to take a look at your setup and see what might be the best solution. Almost all offices these days have IT people on staff, maybe one of them can give you some advice.
Most of my friends are not knowledgeable in IT. Hmm I need to think on who to ask. Landlord claims to have a IT degree but it’s obviously not in networking.
 

Cognizant.

macrumors 6502
May 15, 2022
340
478
I’d recommend the NETGEAR Orbi mesh. Which one will depend on the signal strength you need to punch through walls and things to get decent speed. I had a client whose house was built around solid granite rock. Ended up going with the system that offered over 9000 sq feet of signal for his 4000 sq foot house. Had to figure out the best positioning for the satellites to get the signal around the rock. Alternatively, you can also get a system like UniFi in which all the WiFi access points are hardwired from a single location, bypassing the need to play around with WiFi signal, but it will require routing Ethernet cable through the building.
 

jwolf6589

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Dec 15, 2010
3,816
904
Colorado
I’d recommend the NETGEAR Orbi mesh. Which one will depend on the signal strength you need to punch through walls and things to get decent speed. I had a client whose house was built around solid granite rock. Ended up going with the system that offered over 9000 sq feet of signal for his 4000 sq foot house. Had to figure out the best positioning for the satellites to get the signal around the rock. Alternatively, you can also get a system like UniFi in which all the WiFi access points are hardwired from a single location, bypassing the need to play around with WiFi signal, but it will require routing Ethernet cable through the building.
How much is that?
 
So a access point won’t work. A new router won’t work. I wonder what will work.

w5jck offered very good advice in post #6. I'll just add a few things to it...

As shared in your other threads, ONE ethernet run from the existing router to the space you are renting will then open the door for you to have your own access point, router, etc. That should cost less than co-buying a new wifi6 router (and avoid that tech potentially being held hostage when you are ready to move on), even if you have to have a professional come in to find a way to get one ethernet run through a wall from landlords space to your space. From landlords perspective, this will add value to the rental space since the future tenants can use the direct connection too.

If the landlord's router is next to a hollow wall, this is not a complicated process: tie a heavy something (fishing sinker, washer?) on a piece of cord, punch a small hole (no bigger than a quarter should be enough) in the hollow wall directly above the router location and a second hole next to the router, fish the sinker-weighted line down the hollow wall until the person downstairs can get hold of it and pull it through. You may have to do a little jiggling/swinging to help the other end get hold of it. Then, disconnect the sinker and attach ethernet cable to pull up (or down if you prefer) hole to hole. Patch up the hole around the ethernet cable. When it dries, touch up with matching paint. Boom: direct ethernet from landlord to renter with more bandwidth than you are likely to be able to use yourself. Given speed test speeds you've posted in other threads, that signal won't be affected when landlord is streaming video... unlike shared wifi.

If you want to do it a bit more professionally, use an ethernet plate at each hole. If you need to use a professional to do this for you, hire one who can find the (hollow) path, run the ethernet cable, install the plates at both ends, and connect and test the ethernet connections through both plates. Then it's just a patch (ethernet) cable on your end from plate to either AppleTV or extender, router, etc.

If it happens to be near your AppleTV, plug the ethernet into AppleTV and use existing wifi for Mac, etc. If it is not near the AppleTV, plug it into your own extender/router and create your own wifi network just for you (where you will have 100% of the bandwidth on your wifi channel).

If there are other things near the AppleTV that also have ethernet jacks (currently leaning on wifi), get an extender/router/switch with multiple jacks (out) so you can then directly connect AppleTV with ethernet, anything else in the area that can attach with ethernet and set up your own wifi network too. Every other thing that can direct connect with ethernet is one less thing in your space taking a bite out of your wifi bandwidth.

And again, I agree with w5jck that the most likely issue is the location of your AppleTV relative to landlords router, given that you perceive much better signal with other wifi devices. Perhaps try moving some things around to get the AppleTV in a different location? For instance, if AppleTV is on the South wall, what if you moved it to the West or East wall? Rotating a little furniture can be a very cheap solution to your problem if the wifi signal is good- just not good in one general spot. If you want to test this before moving any furniture, get yourself a LONG HDMI cable or use a small HDMI-capable TV and move AppleTV around to potential new spots and test connections. Once you find a better spot, work out furniture/AV equip rotations to make that spot work.

ONE MORE OPTION (probably mentioned to you in the other threads about this): those powerline ethernet connections can work pretty well.

image.jpeg

For a relative with solid walls but needing ethernet instead of wifi for- coincidentally- stable AppleTV watching, an experiment with those yielded a fast enough connection with no wall holes/drilling. It's easy enough to try those first. Basically that would be:
  • Landlord router ethernet jack: ethernet cable to one powerline ethernet box plugged into the wall.
  • Sister powerline ethernet box plugged in in your space: ethernet cable out of it and into either AppleTV or your own extender or router... but you could test ethernet speed with your laptop.
If you try this and get it working, the next thing to try is moving your end of the connection to a plug perhaps close to your AppleTV and seeing if it works there too (with these things, some plugs can work and others won't). If so, that can deliver a wired ethernet connection to your AppleTV and your Mac, etc can continue to lean on the wifi that seems "good enough" (to you) on those other devices. I just took a peek at Amazon and none of those on the first page are more expensive than $120 with many with good ratings down below $50.

I would generally NOT expect that to work better than a direct ethernet connection and it may not work at all depending on how that place is wired... but that will be easy to try, perhaps BEFORE you drill holes and/or partner on a new router. AppleTV doesn't need super fast connections even to stream 4K video but it does need a relatively steady connection. So this might be a way to get "fast enough" WIRED without much expense or a true cable run.
 
Last edited:

Banglazed

macrumors demi-god
Apr 17, 2017
4,203
6,141
Cupertino, CA
You will need someone who has some knowledge of networking as mentioned. Why? An average would just follow the prompt to setup but an advanced user would tinker a bit to get max performance.
  • Test whether you are getting the advertised speed
  • Reconfigure the router to optimal performance (Wi-Fi site survey regarding channels, width, encryption etc.)
  • Router placement
You can either:

Connect the device either ethernet cable if there is a port nearby or: (ethernet/WiFi)
  • Get an router that will act as a repeater/extender
  • Replace existing router with a mesh system like Orbi, Deco WiFi 6/6E
  • Reposition the router for better coverage
 
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jmonster

macrumors newbie
Mar 21, 2022
21
34
Before you buy anything, mess with the wireless settings of the router you have. Simply changing the channels can make a dramatic difference. You may also be able to simply run an ethernet cable to you ATV? Perhaps give the 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz different SSID names and then try connecting your device to each of them and run a speed test. If you cannot make it work, it's probably a defective/broken router rather than being dated technology.

Also know that not all devices have the same technology. For example, the newest routers support a 160Mhz channel that is faster, but I don't believe any Apple products support that channel. If the router were configured to use it then that alone could be your problem.

As for best routers, I've been digging into this a lot myself, and it's always a mixed bag. I currently have an Amplifi Alien which can be had on eBay for about $300. A similar device that just came out is the Ubiqiti Dream Router which can be had for $200 -- this is what I would recommend, except apparently it has a really loud fan in it. I have 2 on the way and am probably going to just resell them because of this.

A cheap solution that will probably work great is to pick up the last generation Airport Extreme or Time Capsule, which go for about $50 (used) on eBay -- which itself may be sufficient -- but if not, you can also pick up a Ubiquiti U6 Lite access point for $99 (new). The main con with this setup is that I've read that the AirPort maxes out around 500Mbps, even wired. I'm actually skeptical that's true but I haven't tested it myself yet. The access point I mentioned is always sold out, but if you monitor their store around 7:08 EST you will snag one. The same goes for the Dream Router I mentioned.

You could also try the $99 access point with your current ASUS router _if_ it performs well wired. If wired connections are also slow, then something is wrong with the router, or hell, maybe even your ISP/modem.

I don't think you need a mesh setup for a townhome, especially if you can place the router near where you're using it / centrally.

--

It took me awhile to figure it out, but above it's mentioned an access point won't help and I don't believe that makes sense unless we're talking about a relay. If it's just repeating the signal, no, putting it next to the ATV won't help because it would presumably have the same problematic signal to work with. But if it's wired to the router, it would absolutely work fantastically well. Per my suggestion above, you may even get away with putting a new access point right next to the existing router as it'll most likely work better than the built in router. If you do this, turn OFF the wifi feature of the router itself as they'll interfere with one another. And you'll still want to refer back to my first point -- experiment with different channels until you optimize your results
 
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Apple_Robert

macrumors Nehalem
Sep 21, 2012
30,195
39,696
In the middle of several books.
If you have a phone wall jack that isn't being used, you can easily turn it into an ethernet outlet which you can then connect to your Apple TV. I would try connecting the Apple TV via ethernet first, even if it is a temporary connection. And if that works, work on a more permanent ethernet solution that is acceptable to the landlord.
 

Cognizant.

macrumors 6502
May 15, 2022
340
478
He replaced the modem recently. Its allot cheaper just to reboot ATV when it gets slow.
If your landlord would allow an ethernet connection to be routed to your vicinity, you could then hook this up to a Ubiquiti router, or any decent router honestly, and enjoy fast WiFi for every device, not just your Apple TV.

 

960design

macrumors 68040
Apr 17, 2012
3,438
1,307
Destin, FL
I have a Best Buy Credit Card. I am gonna make a proposal to landlord to pay half the price of a WIFI 6 router as our current router is only WIFI 5. As mentioned in other threads I am having issues with present router not only on my ATV but on my Mac as well. I don't use my iPhone enough at home to tell if the issue is there as well. On the Mac the connection drops often and Mac reconnects. Landlord is all Windows/Android and claims to not have any problems so if he is not convinced I may be paying for a new router all alone. So is this a good router? We both stream video often so we need a multimedia router.

This is currently one of my favorites:
Reyee WiFi 6 Router AX3200 Smart Wi-Fi Mesh Router
 

Prorege1

macrumors regular
Jun 21, 2020
202
241
The price?
Did you spend 5 minutes of your life and do as suggested above "To check the signal strength download the free app on your MacBook "WiFi Explorer Lite"."

If/when you have done so pls attach a screenshot of the result, it will show the signal strength and specific channel usage in your location. Nobody can give you any guidance without basic facts from your side.
 
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