Bluray in Unibody Macbook

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by waloshin, Apr 22, 2009.

  1. waloshin macrumors 68040

    waloshin

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    Oct 9, 2008
    #1
    I was wondering would it be possible to install a bluray burner into the unibody macbook?


    I id search , but only came up with an answer about an older Macbook Pro 17".
     
  2. Kardashian macrumors 68020

    Kardashian

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    #2
    I don't think so.

    If you were to use an External drive, Mac OS could only read and write the discs for data - you would not be able to watch movies.
     
  3. r.j.s Moderator emeritus

    r.j.s

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    #3
    Probably not, since IIRC, they are bigger, which is why they only fit in the Pros before.
     
  4. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

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    #4
    Are there even slot loading bluray drives available?:confused:
     
  5. r.j.s Moderator emeritus

    r.j.s

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    #5
  6. johnny13oi macrumors member

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    #6
    if the dvd drive in the aluminum macbook is the same size as the white macbooks then yes it can be done. The M1330 uses the same exact dvd drive as the white macbook and was offered with a bluray drive option. So if you can find one of those and the aluminum takes the same size as the white macbook you should be fine.
     
  7. Ivan P macrumors 68030

    Ivan P

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    #7
    The PS3 has one, so I don't see why not ;)
     
  8. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

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    #8
    If you could hook it up the following would happen:

    1. OS X would see the drive and label it correctly.
    2. OS X would not be able to play the movie
    3. ???
    4. You rage at the fact you installed it just to find out it won't work with OS X.
     
  9. waloshin thread starter macrumors 68040

    waloshin

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  10. r.j.s Moderator emeritus

    r.j.s

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    #10
    The fact that the option is there for the Dell doesn't mean the same drive will fit into a Mac. It may be that the drive is too thick or too big for the MB, and there was just more open space in the Dell when it had the DVD drive in it.
     
  11. MBHockey macrumors 68040

    MBHockey

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    #11
    Plex can play unencrypted Blu-ray movies.

    But why you would want Blu-ray on a 13" screen makes no sense to me (unless you have a nice external to hook it up to).
     
  12. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

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    #12
    Just curious, how many movies are unecrypted. I didn't even knew they were:eek:
     
  13. old-wiz macrumors G3

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    #13
    +1 on that. I've never heard of unencrypted blu-ray movies unless it's home movies.
     
  14. TheNightPhoenix macrumors 6502

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    #14
    All bought ones are encrypted, home made ones aren't, much like DVDs.
     
  15. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

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    #15
    I see. So all Blu-Rays from movies we buy are encrypted.... dam
     
  16. MBHockey macrumors 68040

    MBHockey

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    #16
    Yeah, i thought it was obvious you'd have to use something like AnyDVD HD to make the blu-ray discs Plex-friendly.
     
  17. Kardashian macrumors 68020

    Kardashian

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    #17
    Again, useless.

    One of the main selling points for studio's with Blu-ray is the encryption.

    No new releases, from genuine sellers are going to be unencrypted.
     
  18. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

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    #18
    The PS3 doesnt have a burner in it, does it?:confused:
     
  19. r.j.s Moderator emeritus

    r.j.s

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    #19
    No.
     
  20. Xapphire13 macrumors regular

    Xapphire13

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    #20
    High definition isn't about screen size... it's about pixel density (the 'definition'). So the 13" screen makes perfect sense for blu-ray as it has a high pixel density.

    A 42" full HD screen (1920x1080) would be approx. 52.4 PPI (pixels per inch)
    The macbooks 13.3" screen (1280x800) is approx. 113.5 PPI

    Do the math =]
     
  21. Ivan P macrumors 68030

    Ivan P

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    #21
    I was answering the question about slot-loading Bluray drives, I didn't see anything about burners.
     
  22. Matek macrumors 6502a

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    Jun 6, 2007
    #22
    LOL, I'm afraid someone misinformed you, buddy. HD is not about pixel density, it's about resolution (which often has correlation with screen size). The consequence however is of course the increase in pixel density. If you watch a DVD on your 42" full HD TV, it will have the lower, 576p pal resolution. If you watch a Bluray, it will be in 1080p, so yes, the pixel density will increase.

    But that doesn't mean a MacBook is appropriate for Full HD content. Since Full HD resolution is 1920x1080 and the MacBooks screen is only 1280x800, it can either display only half of the video or resize it down and lose a lot of detail.
     
  23. Xapphire13 macrumors regular

    Xapphire13

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    #23
    Im talking about the actual physical pixels that are there.... not the pixels that a video has... if you look at a 800x600 picture on a 100 PPI screen and then on a 50 PPI screen, the 100 PPI will have a smaller picture but it will look alot more real and appear to be of better quality.

    The bigger the screen the bigger the pixels need to be to fill in that size... do you really want to be watching on a screen that has bigger pixels? Do you look at pictures zoomed so you can see blocking?
     
  24. r.j.s Moderator emeritus

    r.j.s

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    #24
    There's still not any more actual definition. By your explanation, movies played on an iPod are HD, because there are more PPI (163 for Touch). It's an illusion.
     
  25. Xapphire13 macrumors regular

    Xapphire13

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    #25
    There is a lot more 'definition'...

    Mac OS X's dictionary definition of 'definition'

    2 the degree of distinctness in outline of an object, image, or sound, esp. of an image in a photograph or on a screen.
    • the capacity of an instrument or device for making images distinct in outline : [in combination ] high-definition television.

    Now.. more pixel density has the ability to provide more defined pictures... obviously it must be coupled with resolution for larger things... but i was trying to say that screen size does not matter... After all, they dont increase the resolution of full HD TVs when they make them bigger do they? a 22" full HD and 42" full HD screen have the same 1920x1080 resolution... but i can guarantee the picture on the 22" will look more crisp.

    Plus the macbooks screen has enough resolution for 720i/p video to be displayed fully.
     

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