Brand new MBP - Warped.

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Tialys, Jun 21, 2008.

  1. Tialys macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2008
    #1
    I just got my first ever Mac (a MBP) and the first thing I notice when I get it out of the box is the lid is warped! I've called apple and they tell me the only thing they can do is have me send it in to be looked at (4-5 business days without my laptop now) and they may or may not replace the entire system (so I can't really even set it up!). Is this normal and I'm making too much of it, or should I really send this thing in?

    Overall, I'm not too happy about how this has gone so far.

    Suggestions?
     
  2. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

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    #2
    If you aren't happy, send it back
    What choice do you have?

    You also should have your grace period to get your money back

    Woof, Woof - Dawg [​IMG]
     
  3. philgilder macrumors 68000

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    UK
    #3
    a little bending is fine
    millimetre or two at the edges seems normal for a lot of people
    wont damage the screen
     
  4. Eddyisgreat macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2007
    #4
    This is a well documented 'issue'.

    If I understand correctly, your lid seems to be bowing in the middle, which is , unfortunately, how its supposed to be.

    Having the hinges on the inside near the trackpad vs. having them on opposite ends of the machine or magnetic latches make it impossible to "not" bow.

    Theres no real fix for it. Its not really an issue; if you look at your display from the side while its standing up, it should be a straight edge.
     
  5. bebetc macrumors member

    bebetc

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    Boca Raton, FL
    #6
    I think is normal because my came like that too and I got it from an apple the store!!!
     
  6. Neil321 macrumors 68040

    Neil321

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    #7
    Sorry but its normal there have been loads of threads on this subject here is the latest of many
     
  7. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

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    #8
    Wouldn't it depend on how bad the warp is before we classify it as "normal"?

    Any pictures for comparison?

    Woof, Woof - Dawg [​IMG]
     
  8. joshua4561 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2008
    #9
    kinda offtopic, but I wonder
    ppl tell me to go to an apple retail store to buy a new macbook rather than online, cause when something happens to it or something's broke etc. I can just go to the store and get it checked out
    but I wonder if I order one online and something's wrong it, do I need to send it back to wherever it came from or can't I just go to a store to get it checked out
    thx in advance
     
  9. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

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    #10
    Yes, you can take it to the store

    Woof, Woof - Dawg [​IMG]
     
  10. philgilder macrumors 68000

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    UK
  11. peapody macrumors 68040

    peapody

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    baltimore, md
    #12
    I'd say return it. You can do without your computer for a few days. And in the end you would be getting a machine that is perfect in your eyes. Get what you pay for.
     
  12. flyinmac macrumors 68030

    flyinmac

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    #13
    If they wouldn't guarantee you that they'd fix it, I would just outright return it. And, if they don't refund the entire amount of your purchase (as in if they charge a restocking fee), then I'd challenge it with your credit card company to recover the full amount.

    Do not accept defects, and don't let them push you past the return period by killing time with shipping. They can get you past that 14 day return period with you not having a computer in your hands.

    I say return and demand a full refund.
     
  13. weemanpow3 macrumors 6502

    weemanpow3

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #14
    have the same problem, the lid isnt perfectly flat its warpped but not that bad as yours. I think it's starting to settle down and now it isnt looking as bad as the first time I got my mbp. maby it is just me but apple should do something about this issue that lots of people have.
     
  14. NC MacGuy macrumors 603

    NC MacGuy

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    #15
    Philgilder's pic is pretty representative of almost all I've seen or owned. I'm afraid if you want perfectly flat you may not want a MBP.
     
  15. Rivix macrumors 6502a

    Rivix

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    Oct 13, 2005
    #16
    I was in FutureShop today, and 2/3 had a slight warp.
     
  16. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

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    #17
    just do your best to recognize the difference between having a defective mbp and being picky

    you could miss out on an amazing machine

    Woof, Woof - Dawg [​IMG]
     
  17. flyinmac macrumors 68030

    flyinmac

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    #18
    Poor construction or build quality is a defect. Just because they consistently have the same defect doesn't mean that it's not a defect.

    For the premium price of Apple's hardware, expecting a polished appearance and perfect appearance is quite reasonable. I would demand the same of any $500 PC laptop. Actually, even if I purchased a $200 PC, I would expect the same.

    The point, is that if something is new, it should appear perfect. I would not accept imperfection of any new item I purchase.

    Afterall, I've returned $5 items for having smaller imperfections than that. Anything new, should represent it's "new" status in appearance.

    Poor workmanship or build quality that is consistently poor does not mean it is not defective. It just means they are consistent in having the same issue.

    Now, isn't the MacBook Pro supposed to be the Cadillac of laptop computers? I can guarantee you that if the fender on my Cadillac was slightly out of alignment, I would be back in the dealer telling them it would be adjusted and lined-up properly. Even if every Cadillac was like that when it left the factory, it would be adjusted before I considered it to be fitting of Cadillac name and price. But, then I wouldn't accept a panel out of alignment on a new Yugo either.

    Simply put, do not accept poor workmanship just because it is consistently poor. Demand better.

    If enough people would actually expect Apple to do better, and quit tolerating these issues, then Apple would deliver. As long as everyone tolerates this garbage, Apple will keep producing it.
     
  18. NC MacGuy macrumors 603

    NC MacGuy

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    #19
    I'm not so sure it is a defect. I really think it is in Apples tolerances for the unit. Seriously. If the OP's gap is like the one pictured in this thread, he'll be hard pressed to get one better. I've been down that road before with my Alumi. PB through two MBP's. I did have a Ti PB display that sat flush to case.
     
  19. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

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    #20
    I don't consider this to be poor construction or a defect.

    My point was... each of us has to determine the difference between a defect and being picky. The threshold of that standard is different for different people. I spent $3,000+ on my MBP, but honestly, I haven't looked to see if my lid looks like the one in the pic or not. I'm too busy using my MBP to notice that. To others, it is a huge deal. I don't abuse my MBP, but I don't baby it either. I use it.

    I have already said, if it is defective, it should be sent back. If the OP feels it is defective, then send it back. I would do the same if mine was defective.

    Woof, Woof - Dawg [​IMG]
     
  20. flyinmac macrumors 68030

    flyinmac

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    #21
    All that means is that Apple's tolerances are not strict enough. Accepting poor products just because that's all a company makes is a bit ridiculous.

    Just because they are all like that doesn't make it O.K.

    Apple will keep these poor standards as long as people refuse to speak with their money.

    I held out for my last Apple machine until they had build quality for a model refined to meet my expectations. I purchased the only machine they offered that met my quality standards. Other machines (like the iMac) would have been fine if the quality was there.

    But, instead, I made Apple wait to get my money until the quality was there. And, if it wasn't there with the machine I purchased, you could bet it would have gone back.

    I've had enough duds from Apple, and finally decided I wasn't buying another one. So, I went without a daily use Mac for over a year waiting for a machine that would meet my standards. If everyone did that, you could bet Apple would make some changes.

    When garbage stops selling, better stuff takes it place rather quickly to save the company.

    If people will buy garbage, then that's what they'll sell.
     
  21. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

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    #22
    Gee, it must be hell to live in such an imperfect world

    Woof, Woof - Dawg [​IMG]
     
  22. flyinmac macrumors 68030

    flyinmac

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    #23
    Not really. I just take garbage back. I keep the good stuff.
     
  23. chariotofFIRE macrumors member

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    Jun 18, 2007
    #24
    LOLOL :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes: Wow. Talk about egotistical. The world is not perfect; I can't believe you don't completely understand these simple words. If you owned a business, you would understand that imperfections ruin the ability to run a sucessful company. You along with many of the snotty nosed people on this thread really need to understand how much a computer is worth in your life, ZERO. Bleeping elitist, you must be still looking for your supermodel wife.

    I mean to think realistically, this forum is full of complaining. Every MBP is warped a little, and if it was a lot it would not even change the ability of the MBP. I never thought before i came to this forum that a macbook pro can have so many defects!!! You won't live comfortable being picky.
     
  24. flyinmac macrumors 68030

    flyinmac

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    #25
    Actually, I have worked and run my own businesses (now sold to pursue other things in life). And, some of those were computer manufacturing businesses. And, I did impose a 0 defect rule. And, guess how many repairs I had to perform (0).

    Nothing left our company until it was perfect. And, feedback from our customers was 100% positive. Instead of hearing complaints, I got calls all the time from customers wanting to talk about how great their computers were.

    It is possible to make money selling perfection. And, it is more profitable than selling imperfection. Because any component with the slightest imperfection was refused and sent back to the manufacturer, I never sold anything that broke down.

    Well, I take it back, I did have a few computers that came in for their first and only service repair (they needed a new clock battery after about 5 years). Those, I'd just give them even though they were beyond warranty (after-all, what's a $3 battery).

    I've since sold my businesses off. But, you can bet I had quite a track record. Every machine was assembled, tested, and quality checked by a real person. No machine would leave our company until it had been through a 40-hour minimum stress test as a fully assembled machine with a person to constantly monitor and inspect the status of every machine currently being stressed.

    If any machine demonstrated the slightest hiccup, it was broken down and every component was individually analyzed to find the faulty part.

    Nothing ever left with the slightest issue. No defects. No imperfections. No cosmetic issues.

    They all represented the highest quality machines available. And, because I knew they wouldn't fail, I backed them with 100% free support. And, that included on-site in-home or in-office service (though it was never needed).

    Our phones only rang for new orders and from customers who wanted to tell us happy stories.

    Quality in production is possible. You just have to set those standards and stick to them.

    I launched the businesses with a goal and a standard. And, I never lost sight of that. And, it showed in the products my companies sold.

    You can live quite well demanding the best. Settling for inferior quality doesn't improve your quality of life.

    There's accepting imperfections in life. And, there's selling yourself short by wasting money on poor quality.
     

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