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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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The developers behind the Brave browser today announced some changes for the iOS version of Brave, which are being implemented to comply with Apple's App Store rules.

brave-browser-rewards.jpg

A new version of the Brave browser being released today for the iPhone and the iPad removes features that allowed people to earn rewards for browsing and to tip creators. Brave has a system that allows those using the browser to earn money for viewing ads, which can then be given to preferred content creators.
Brave Rewards is built on the Basic Attention Token (BAT) and is a new way to value attention, connecting users, content creators, and advertisers. Users are rewarded in BAT with 70% of the ad revenue share of the privacy-preserving ads they opt into viewing, and they can support content creators they love by rewarding them with BAT. There are currently over 985,000 Brave verified content creators.
With the release of iOS 14, Apple told Brave that the Brave Rewards system was not compliant with App Store guidelines 3.1.1 and 3.2.2. The 3.1.1 rule prevents apps from giving a tip to a person unless what's provided is purchased through in-app purchases, while the 3.2.2 rule prevents "tasks for cash." Brave's developers say that this guideline is aimed at preventing apps from asking users to give 5 star ratings in return for points, and that Apple has likened the opt-in viewing of Brave Ads as tasks for cash.

Though there is no path for earning rewards from viewing Brave ads on iOS going forward, Brave says that it hopes that users will continue to opt in as Brave still plans to provide creators with monthly donations.

Brave's developers are "disappointed" with the update, but say that Brave users can continue to enjoy the "same fast and privacy-preserving iOS browser they know." These changes will not apply to the desktop version of the app or the Android versions.

Article Link: Brave Browser for iOS Updates App to Remove Reward Features That Violated App Store Rules
 

Apple_Robert

macrumors Penryn
Sep 21, 2012
29,234
37,597
In the middle of several books.
I'll take how to destroy an app for 500 Alex.
How is the app destroyed? If it can’t survive unless it is able to violate App Store rules, that doesn’t say much about the app, in my opinion.

A browser supposedly geared towards privacy wanting to pay people to view ads seems rather hypocritical to me.
 

betterbegood

macrumors 6502
May 21, 2014
313
637
San Lonkong
Still the best browser out there. Used Chrome since its beta. Swapped to Firefox because of the privacy concerns that Chrome unfortunately is born with. Chromium is still the best rendering engine out there so gave Brave a go 6 months ago and it's both faster just feels nicer. The BAT tokens are a good idea just not that great executed - but they are still thinking more logically about this than most browsers out there.
 

TechNeutrality

macrumors newbie
Dec 9, 2013
2
1
So Apple doesn't want internet sites to monetize via tracking (which is good for privacy), and they won't allow monetization using Brave on iOS either (??). Seems like a non-tracking-supported internet should be something Apple either allows to happen or actively encourages. I don't get it.
 
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connormw

macrumors member
Mar 24, 2018
37
330
New York
So Apple doesn't want internet sites to monetize via tracking (which is good for privacy), and they won't allow monetization using Brave on iOS either (??). Seems like a non-tracking-supported internet should be something Apple either allows to happen or actively encourages. I don't get it.
They're fine with monetization, so long as it goes through the App Store. Ya know, even if no money is actually passing from the consumer to the app developer.

Pretty soon Apple is going to want users to remit a portion of their Farmville earnings.
 

ozzymo

Cancelled
Mar 19, 2012
342
211
So Apple doesn't want internet sites to monetize via tracking (which is good for privacy), and they won't allow monetization using Brave on iOS either (??). Seems like a non-tracking-supported internet should be something Apple either allows to happen or actively encourages. I don't get it.
Apple doesn't care about any of that. They only care that they're not getting their 30% cut
 

ozzymo

Cancelled
Mar 19, 2012
342
211
Brave is supposed to be a privacy browser. The ad rewards program seems antithetical to that aim. Good riddance.
It's a choice. No one is forced to view ads. I used Brave and never signed up for the program or viewed one ad. I fail to see how consumer choice is a bad thing.
 
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ryanflanders256

macrumors regular
Feb 22, 2006
116
57
It's a choice. No one is forced to view ads. I used Brave and never signed up for the program or viewed one ad. I fail to see how consumer choice is a bad thing.
I don't like the idea of a privacy browser with adware built in that can be enabled with a switch flick. It's a positive change imo.
 
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tomtominson

macrumors newbie
Dec 10, 2020
1
2
I don't like the idea of a privacy browser with adware built in that can be enabled with a switch flick. It's a positive change imo.
Their browser introduces advertising that does not track users. No one else has done this. Calling what Brave is doing "adware" as if it's akin to scams or browser adware toolbars is a pretty unfair and unrealistic categorization.
 

applicious84

macrumors 6502
Sep 1, 2020
302
656
How is the app destroyed? If it can’t survive unless it is able to violate App Store rules, that doesn’t say much about the app, in my opinion.

A browser supposedly geared towards privacy wanting to pay people to view ads seems rather hypocritical to me.
I'm not completely sure about this, but it seems that Apple changed the rules after the release of Brave having those features. And those rules in question are largely rules to benefit Apple. If that's the case, it's tough to demand obsequience to rules written after the fact, rules that benefit the writer of said rules while claiming a failure to survive based on the party retroactively subject to those rules. Rules that are applied and twisted to favor Apple by Apple seem to not be rules so much tactics
 
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ozzymo

Cancelled
Mar 19, 2012
342
211
I don't like the idea of a privacy browser with adware built in that can be enabled with a switch flick. It's a positive change imo.
Adware is something sneaky that is on your system without your knowledge. Brave tells you up front hey if you want to enroll in this program and view ads you can earn a little revenue and gift it to a creator or whoever. I didn't want to and chose to decline the program and never saw an ad. I don't think it's adware if they tell you up front and give you a choice.
 

ozzymo

Cancelled
Mar 19, 2012
342
211
I'm not completely sure about this, but it seems that Apple changed the rules after the release of Brave having those features. And those rules in question are largely rules to benefit Apple. If that's the case, it's tough to demand obsequience to rules written after the fact, rules that benefit the writer of said rules while claiming a failure to survive based on the party retroactively subject to those rules. Rules that are applied and twisted to favor Apple by Apple seem to not be rules so much tactics
Hey this is a MacRumors forum. Apple can change the rules whenever they want and force companies to adhere to those changed rules or go out of business. Apple can do no wrong /s
 
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Dave-Z

macrumors 6502a
Jun 26, 2012
858
1,412
I don't like the idea of a privacy browser with adware built in that can be enabled with a switch flick. It's a positive change imo.

I dislike the idea that Brave hides content creator's ads but inserts its own. I know there's a whole system for tipping, etc. but it seems to me that if visitors want to support a site, they should do so using the method the site owner provides. I do not use Brave for this reason.

On another note: I also dislike Apple's whole penny-pinching, nit-picking attitude. Everything from not including a charger with their phones, AirPods Max, etc. to creating rules for their store that limit developers like Hey, Brave, etc. There are plenty of completely free apps that Apple hosts for only the $100/year developer fee that probably burden Apple's servers more; these often includes outside ads for which Apple sees no revenue. But something like Brave gets a warning. Seems stupid to me. But this is just my opinion.
 

Shirasaki

macrumors G5
May 16, 2015
12,382
6,394
Hey this is a MacRumors forum. Apple can change the rules whenever they want and force companies to adhere to those changed rules or go out of business. Apple can do no wrong /s
I increasingly think Apple structure is highly similar to a country in the world. I wonder which country it is. Not USA though.
 

Mr.Brossard

macrumors member
Jan 17, 2002
52
33
Colorado
Still the best browser out there. Used Chrome since its beta. Swapped to Firefox because of the privacy concerns that Chrome unfortunately is born with. Chromium is still the best rendering engine out there so gave Brave a go 6 months ago and it's both faster just feels nicer. The BAT tokens are a good idea just not that great executed - but they are still thinking more logically about this than most browsers out there.
Yes. Brave, combined with a DNSBL, is a powerful set of tools to fight ads.
 

greenbreadmmm

macrumors 6502
Jun 4, 2007
296
327
How is the app destroyed? If it can’t survive unless it is able to violate App Store rules, that doesn’t say much about the app, in my opinion.

A browser supposedly geared towards privacy wanting to pay people to view ads seems rather hypocritical to me.
The entire Brave/Bat ecosystem is built around rewarding the user for ads (they choose to view) and paying content creators (Like MacRumors) for their offerings. So if Apple decides late in the game that it is no longer allowed to do that...it destroys the point of Brave browsing, as well as the appeal of the app.

How you got to "if it can't survive unless it violates apples TOS" is beyond a stretch and disingenuous of the timeline we are on. Apple changed the rules mid game and you somehow blame brave?
 

rjp1

macrumors 6502
Mar 27, 2015
497
1,581
Still the best browser out there. Used Chrome since its beta. Swapped to Firefox because of the privacy concerns that Chrome unfortunately is born with. Chromium is still the best rendering engine out there so gave Brave a go 6 months ago and it's both faster just feels nicer. The BAT tokens are a good idea just not that great executed - but they are still thinking more logically about this than most browsers out there.
I really like ungoogled-chromium. It is chrome with all the google crap taken out.
 
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