Building a Rig (need Advice)

Discussion in 'Mac and PC Games' started by Barnzee, Sep 17, 2012.

  1. Barnzee macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2010
    Location:
    Oak Harbor, WA
    #1
    Was wondering if I could get advice on a new build. For example: what you would do different, compatability issues, Known issues with components etc.

    I tried posting on Tom's Hardware but didn't really get any worthwhile responses. Plus I've been a member for a while and know there are some knowledgable people here.

    P.S. This isn't an Anti-Mac thread I have a MBP, but I want a dedicated gaming rig too. I don't really have a Budget (translated: No Wife) but am looking to stay around 2000 USD, and have a rig to last a few years.

    Here is what I got picked out so far:

    Case: Corsair Obsidian 650D 179.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811139006
    Power Supply:Cosair HX Series HX850W 174.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139011
    Motherboard:Asus Sabertooth Z77 ATX LGA 1155 239.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131821
    CPU: Intel i7-3770K Ivy Bridge 329.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116501
    GPU: EVGA GeoForce GTX 690 999.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130781
    Memory: Corsair Dominator Platinum 16GB 1866Mhz 164.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820233305
    SSD: Cosair GTX 120 GB SATA3 139.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820233342
    ODD: LG DVD burner OEM 16.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827136247

    Total: 2,246.92 USD
     
  2. avemestr macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2012
    #2
    There are 4 kinds of people:

    1) People building a rig, without actually knowing what they're doing.

    2) People building a rig, with a good understanding of what they're doing.

    3) People buying a pre-assembled Dell or HP.

    4) People buying a pre-assembled Apple.

    Now, you haven't specified if you're going to run OS X or not, so basicly you can be placed in any of the categories above.

    But since you don't want to buy something pre-assembled, that initially excludes group 3 and 4.

    If you were in group 2, you wouldn't start a thread like this.

    So I'll place you in group 1, which leaves two options:

    Option 1: If you want to run OS X on your rig, follow tonymacx86 CustoMac suggestion TO THE LETTER: http://tonymacx86.blogspot.dk/search/label/CustoMac

    Option 2: If you only want to run Windows on your rig, join the people in group 3 and buy a pre-assembled Dell. The markup isn't that much, compared to the time you'll waste and the frustration you'll experience building your own.
     
  3. El Awesome macrumors 6502

    El Awesome

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Zurich
    #3
    Go to the Mac Pro forums, they know better. Several guys with hackintoshes there.
     
  4. Ap0ks macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2008
    Location:
    Cambridge, UK
    #4
    Worst advice ever... So arrogant in your assessment of people, and yet you can't take 5 minutes to read the post - he said dedicated gaming rig.

    @OP - that build will last you a good few years. If you wanted to, you could rein in on a few of the components to reduce the price dramatically without cutting the lifespan too much.
     
  5. avemestr macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2012
    #5
    And a Dell Alienware worth $2000 isn't a "dedicated gaming rig"?

    What was arrogant about my precise assessment? I provided the OP with valuable advice, and even took into account that he didn't specify if he wanted the possibilty of running OS X as well.

    BEST ADVICE EVER! "You can save money on some components without reducing the lifespan too much". I think you're competing the oracle of Delphi when you provide such insights.

    If you find my response arrogant, your response was patronizing.
     
  6. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #6
    I've rooted around the inside of both my Macs and PCs. I've replaced power supplies, added memory and video cards. It's just not that hard. What I imagine requires a little bit of knowledge, probably easily obtained from the motherboard manufacturer is setting up the BIOS. Go buy a PC Gamer, each month (I think) they include a building your own rig page with suggested parts, google "building a gaming pc" for results like this and good luck! :)
     
  7. QuantumLo0p, Sep 17, 2012
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2012

    QuantumLo0p macrumors 6502a

    QuantumLo0p

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2006
    Location:
    U.S.A.
    #7
    Basically sounds good to me. I just built a water cooled i7 3930K rig with 32GB and a 680. I don't need 32 for gaming but rather for some other hungry apps.

    You may only need 1600 ram; I have read articles about current systems can't saturate it so faster won't get you anything. Same as pci3.0; current video cards can't saturate those slots either.

    Check the Asus list for supported ram. Although when I checked for my Asus P9X79 Pro mobo it didn't list the 4x8 32GB Corsair kit; it didn't list any kits above 8GB which really ticked me off because it's a 64GB board! (certify your boards, Asus!)

    Do you need a 690 for the games you play? I'd check your games to see if a 680 would suffice and you could save yourself $500. Also, you can get screen tearing if your fps is higher than your monitor's Hz. Some monitors do 75 but many do 60; like my led hd display. I can do 95-100 fps but decided to turn on v-sync in the game which limits the fps the same as the monitor to keep the screen image nice. When I let it rip at 95-100 fps the screen was starting to get a bit jittery and it actually looked a bit worse than when I set it 60 fps. I don't have a need for the 690 at this time but my plan is to get a second 680 in the future (and after they drop a little) if I decide I need better graphics for other games.

    I think your cpu comes with a fan but if you OC I would consider a decent air cpu cooler and if you're going to go crazy on the OC then get a decent water cooling set up. Don't burn it up or you'll be out a cpu and have to buy another.

    Is a 120GB ssd big enough for you? If not then at least a larger ssd or consider another 120 ssd. Some people like to have separate drives for the OS and applications. If you stay with one don't sweat it; it will be plenty fast and, besides, once anything gets into ram it'll be there and speedy until you run out of ram (unlikely) or reboot (lot more likely, lol). Some games can get big; 30GB+

    By the way when I first powered up I couldn't get it to post (power on self test?) and I messed around for two evenings. All it took to get it to post was to reset the cmos to clear the bios. I would never had thought it needed that straight from the factory. I recommend to clear the cmos if you don't post right away. As for the bios version I wouldn't mess with it unless you've read somewhere you need to do it immediately. I was all worried about doing the usb bios flash (I don't know if the Sabertooth can do that) right away but in the end I upgraded the bios after the rig was up and running.

    Also, I believe if you plan to run Win8 then eventually you will need to upgrade the bios anyway.
     
  8. SPUY767 macrumors 68000

    SPUY767

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2003
    Location:
    GA
    #8
    Did you purposely pick the most expensive of each part? Get an i5. They oc better in my experience. You lose next to nothing, but spend half as much. You'd do better with two dedicated 7970's if you're going to drop that much on a power supply. Sounds to me like you're just wasting money. Not really interested in the highest level of performance, or value. I don't even see a cooler on there, and you need at least a self contained water cooler.
     
  9. Ap0ks macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2008
    Location:
    Cambridge, UK
    #9
    A $2000 Alienware includes ~$500 of markup so yeah great advice, if they don't mind paying over the odds :cool:

    An i5 with 8GB RAM and a decent graphics card will be able to play today's games, last a good couple of years and save a good chunk of money - what's so patronising about that?
     
  10. cosmicjoke macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2011
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #10

    Hey man, I built a rig w/ similar components to yours... i'm using the corsair 650d, beautiful case --- note that you can also get a solid side door or mesh side panel for from corsair's website.

    I chose the Asus Z77 P8Z77-V Pro, it's similarly priced and has more phases (better for OCing) - the sabertooth is still decent for OCing though, and looks way cooler (i hate the baby blue on mine lol)

    I'm not a huge fan of Corsair's SSDs, one thing, they only have a Windows flash tool for their firmware, which I find annoying... Crucial M4 for example has a bootable ISO.

    as for the gtx 690, that is essentially two graphics chips on one board, personally i'd prefer just having two gtx 680s, it's less of a hassle if one fails the whole thing doesn't.... I think it might keep things cooler as well.

    Don't forget a good aftermarket cpu cooler, look into a corsair h80 or h100 in push/pull with some aftermarket fans like scythe gentle typhoons...

    Also if you can get a corsair ax850 instead they're nicer than the hx IMO, the ax850 is fully modular, is what i have.
     
  11. cosmicjoke macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2011
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #11
    Actually he chose high quality components from reputable vendors.... Corsair & EVGA will let you RMA anything w/ a very quick turn around... their tech support is simply the best, they take care of you and they're well worth any premium... He flat up needs a good PSU for the gtx 690, an 850w corsair (which is a rebranded seasonic) is pretty much mandatory....

    Imo he's made excellent choices.
     
  12. Barnzee, Sep 18, 2012
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2012

    Barnzee thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2010
    Location:
    Oak Harbor, WA
    #12
    I think I'm somewhere between group 1 & 2. My main concern was compatability issues. Just because I've never built a computer doesn't mean I have no Idea what i'm doing or am clueless. From what I read and reaserched online it doesn't seem too complicated. Most if not all is plug and play. I just wanted advice from people with experience who have built before. I wanted cunstuctive feedback to see what I should do different. However, I also see that maybe I wasn't descriptive enough in reasoning for the choices I have made so far.

    I don't plan on using OSX as I have a MBP, and I absolutely wan't to build myself. Not just because of the price savings, but the satisfation of doing it myself. I think it will be fun.

    Alot of the choices that I made where not based on price but Aesthetics. especially the 650d and the Asus Motherbord. Plus they had good reviews.

    I wanted a good power supply since I was planning on using a very expensive gaphics card and wanted the ability expand later. I've heard nothing but good things about Corsair so I went with an 80 plus gold certified one. However, as recommended I will probably buy a fully modular one for better cable management.

    As suggested I'm just going to go with the GTX680 instead, and do SLI in the future if needed. I plan on getting a 2560x1600 resolution monitor in the future so I assumed the 690 would be the better choice. for now the 680 will suffice.

    I'll probably buy a bigger SSD with the GPU savings say around 240GB. I have a hard time comparing those though so I have more reseach to do.

    Quite a few reccommend an after market CPU cooler. Can someone recommend a good one? I haven't really looked into Water cooling either.
     
  13. cosmicjoke macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2011
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #13
    I already did recommend a cpu cooler, the corsair h80 or h100... possibly w/ aftermarket fans as well in a push/pull config (scythe gentle typhoon ap-15 are a popular choice). I think you'll be happy w/ 1 gtx 680, i have an evga gtx 670 ftw (the 680s were out of stock for weeks back when i got mine) and run dual 2560x1440p displays off it... get great performance for the games i play.. the 680 is a good 10-15% faster I believe depending on game.

    As for SSDs, the Samsung 830 is always a really good choice, a lot of people are happy w/ the Crucial M4 (I have a 256gb one w/ no complaints in my '11 mbp and my gaming rig, but I think Samsung gets better benchmarks).
     
  14. Barnzee thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2010
    Location:
    Oak Harbor, WA
    #14
    So the H80 or H100 would be for the CPU and the Scythe gentle typhoon would replace the stock Fans of the 650d to cool everything else right?
     
  15. cosmicjoke, Sep 18, 2012
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2012

    cosmicjoke macrumors 6502

    Joined:
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    Portland, OR
    #15
    They're replacement fans for the radiator of the H80 or H100, generally considered to be great performance without being noisy. Push/Pull means you're using one fan to push air through the radiator on one side and the other to pull that air out on the other. The H80 takes 2 fans, and the H100 takes 4... There are mounts on each side of the rad.

    You will remove the stock fan on either the back of the case for the H80 or the 200mm on the top for the H100, there are mounting holes in the 650d for either... Though, the 650d may have issues running push/pull w/ your Sabertooth on an H100 because of the heatsinks on the board.. If you're interested in the H100 and running push/pull, I'd double check on Corsair's support forums to see if your board is good for the 650d... If not, the H80 may be a better choice.

    You don't have to run the H100 in push/pull though if you want one and it won't fit nicely w/ in push/pull w/ your board (we're only talking 2-3c lower temps at best, but it's something an OC enthusiast generally wants).
     
  16. DeaconGraves macrumors 65816

    DeaconGraves

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2007
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    #16
    Frankly, this is overkill. But I guess if you've got the money, might as well spend it.

    If you want to save some money to put towards other components (a good monitor, a solid state drive), I would suggest the following.

    Drop the i7 for an i5-3570K. It's going to run pretty much anything you throw at it, and you can overclock it if you need more power.

    Drop the GTX 690. A 670 is just fine and costs $600 less.

    8 Gigs of ram is really all you need if this is a gaming machine.
     
  17. Acorn macrumors 68020

    Acorn

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2009
    Location:
    macrumors
    #17
    my opinion is your paying to much for case power supply memory and video card.

    670 video card is fine
    16 gb of ram should be around 100 bucks max
    the corsair case is nice but there is alot of good cases for less
    you can get a sweet power supply for 125 bucks. no need to spend so much.


    Your build is fine and would work but your wasting a shatload of money imho.
     
  18. cosmicjoke macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2011
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #18

    I totally disagree, it's a beautiful case and entirely worth the money, however I got mine on amazon new & shipped for $150, so he isn't get the best deal on it... If you wanted to save a little more, there's always the Corsair 600T, it's pretty much the same case w/ slightly different aesthetics and not hot swapping bay on the top, which I've seen for roughly $120 shipped.

    His RAM does seem overpriced slightly, I got 16gb 1600mhz ram for $80 a year or so ago at Fry's, his is rated higher though and I haven't been looking.

    I am a big advocate of not skimping on a PSU, and I think the hx850 is a great choice for potentially running SLI (which he might)... I'd spend a little more tbh and get the AX850 though as it's fully modular.

    IMO you can start cutting corners, but then you won't have a high end, which is what the OP wanted. He's on the right track...
     
  19. QuantumLo0p macrumors 6502a

    QuantumLo0p

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    Apr 28, 2006
    Location:
    U.S.A.
    #19
    Yes, be careful of clearance issues...
    On my Asus P9X79 Pro board the H80 barely clears the Corsair Vengence ram by perhaps only 1-2mm and also covers a heatsink that sits between the ram and the rear ports. I have been keeping an eye on the temps and everything is staying cool so far. I wanted to use the H80 so I could keep the 200mm fan in the top of the HAF 922 case but if I have to I will swap the H80 for the H100.

    Also, if you use an H80 in back you might want to have the air flow going out, which seems common, even though the skimpy Corsair manual says to pull air into the case. You should have plenty of decent air inside the case to push out and you will also not suck in hot air rising from your video card.
     
  20. spencers macrumors 68020

    spencers

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2004
    #20
    Per your spec list, an ATX case/motherboard is kinda overkill (in my opinion).

    For a single GPU and SSD setup, I'd be looking at going ITX, or at the least, mATX. Lian Li and Silverstone make some sweet SFF cases that can fit a GTX 680.
     
  21. Dahkot macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2011
    #21
    Those saying it is overkill either didn't read the resolution he wants to run or don't know how much video card power you need to do it well in pc gaming.

    OP for 2560x1600 resolution that card isn't overkill. To be able to comfortably run everything at 60fps with all eye candy on at 2560 you need the 690 or two 680's , and you can verify this easily enough at multiple sites from anand to hardocp.

    Running 2560x1600 is a beautiful thing just needs tons of video card power to do it and not have low frame rate dips.
     

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