Can we install Mac OS on PC

Discussion in 'macOS' started by mhtahir, Sep 3, 2007.

  1. mhtahir macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2007
    #1
    Can we install Mac OS on PC
    is it possible:
    if yes
    tell me
    how?
     
  2. mad jew Moderator emeritus

    mad jew

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    #2
    It's possible but it violates the EULA and therefore cannot be discussed on MacRumors.
     
  3. ajbrehm macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2002
    Location:
    Zurich, Switzerland
    #3
    It is possible, but why would you want to?

    Mac OS X requires quite advanced hardware (i.e. a newer computer) and supports only a small subset of built-in peripherals (i.e. those Apple use in their computers). Running Mac OS X on a non-Apple machine was always possible, even in PowerPC times, but never really useful (since nobody ever made faster machines than Apple themselves).

    Running Mac OS X on a non-Apple computer would give you little advantage over running any other BSD or UNIX-like OS apart from the ability to run Macintosh applications, of which there are fewer than Windows applications.

    The value of Mac OS X lies in the combination of UNIX and general purpose OS and supported hardware. Without one of the three, its value is not quite as clear.

    If you want to experiment with operating systems, I recommend getting FreeBSD or Solaris. Both are easier to install than Mac OS X on non-supported hardware.

    Alternatively, simply buy an actual Macintosh computer to see what Mac OS X is about.
     
  4. gnasher729 macrumors P6

    gnasher729

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    #4
    It is actually quite easy. Just buy a PC made by Apple, like a MacMini, or an iMac, or a MacPro, or one of their portable PCs, MacBook and MacBook Pro. These PCs come with a legal install DVD for MacOS X. Just put it into the PC, hold down the "C" key while turning on the PC, and install it.
     
  5. cprail macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2007
    #5
    haha brainwashed bs...
     
  6. smythey macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2007
    Location:
    Scotland
    #6
    If folks can discuss issues which clearly break their Apple NDA, then why should they not be able to talk about issues which break the Apple EULA? Tu quoque I know.

    Are you talking morally, legally, or Macrumoursy?
     
  7. THX1139 macrumors 68000

    THX1139

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2006
    #7
    haha troll...
     
  8. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Location:
    In the velcro closure of America's Hat
    #9
    There are no forum rules that stop someone from breaking their NDA. EULA is a software license and these are specifically mention in the rules.
     
  9. smythey macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2007
    Location:
    Scotland
    #10
    Its the agreement you make when installing a bit of software. The dialogue box with about 3000 words that nobody reads and they check the box to continue...!
     
  10. Wayfarer macrumors 65816

    Wayfarer

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2007
    #11
    I don't see why anyone would want to install Mac OS X on a PC.

    Blarrrgh...

    *runs to nearest wastebasket and retches*
     
  11. smythey macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2007
    Location:
    Scotland
    #12
    Thanks - I didnt know that. I would have thought that it would be the other way round though - by posting certain images or information you are actually breaking the NDA right there and then. But just talking about how hypothetically one could could install OS X on a PC doesnt break the EULA itself, it only would if you went ahead and did it.
    Rules are rules, but rules are also there to be challenged!

    Me , I love consistency!.....
     
  12. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #13
    A non-disclosure agreement (NDA) is something that is agreed to between parties when proprietary (usually R&D, but sometimes strategic) information is shared. An end user license agreement (EULA) is something that an end-user agrees as part of the terms to receive a license to use a commercial product. They're different things.

    A developer who has an Apple beta (i.e. of Leopard) has entered into a non-disclosure agreement with Apple to not disclose proprietary information that was shared with them. If they share information from that beta, then they have violated an NDA.

    If you take your release copy of Tiger, and hack it to work on non-Apple hardware, you were never covered by an NDA to begin with. The knowhow itself of how to do this may or may not be addressed by law (DMCA, etc), but the EULA applies to what you do with the software. The thing that breaks the EULA is the act of installing and running the software on the non-Apple hardware (because that's what's in the EULA), more than the knowhow itself.

    Does that make any sense? They're both legal agreements, but they cover different things under different circumstances.
     
  13. smythey macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2007
    Location:
    Scotland
    #14
    Hi - That makes perfect sense, I knew all this already. But why on Macrumors:

    NDA - Breaks agreement, but okay to discuss
    EULA - Breaks agreement, but big no-no to discuss?

    Im sure (or at least hopeful), that theres a reason for this, but I cant see it as yet. My cynical side thinks the reason is that if all NDA-breaking info/posts on here were deleted it get a trifle more dull.....
     
  14. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Location:
    In the velcro closure of America's Hat
    #15
    Your cycnical side is probably nearer the truth. ;)
     
  15. smythey macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2007
    Location:
    Scotland
    #16
    :) If logic cant win, I can live with plain old realism!
     
  16. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Location:
    In the velcro closure of America's Hat
    #17
    Never thought I'd say this, but what we need around here is a lawyer!
     
  17. Macky-Mac macrumors 68030

    Macky-Mac

    Joined:
    May 18, 2004
    #18
    Keep in mind that the only person who can break a NDA is the person who signed it in the first place.....the rest of us aren't part of and aren't bound by somebody else's NDA, so there's really no legal risk to the site if we discuss

    On the other hand, even a "theoretical" discuss of how to break a EULA would potentially expose the owners of the site to the cost and annoyance of legal action undertaken by a company trying to prevent such discussions.
     
  18. Bl3s5in macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2007
    #19
    Why would you come here before asking Google? When did every one forget how to use search engines? You will find it with in the first few results of OS X on a PC.
     
  19. neilxt macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 14, 2008
    #20
    While it is true that the Mac is competitively priced for matching systems it is NOT true that you can always buy a competitively priced Mac, especially if you are in a position to take advantage of discounts for other brands.

    If you particularly want high end anything then with an Apple computer you are stuck with getting high end everything:mad:.

    My company has a deal where I can buy any computer I want that will run Windows natively (which now includes Macs) and they will front the money. I need one for work. They get a discount of up to 30% from Dell.

    I specced out what I needed and compared prices.

    My top priority is screen real estate, so I wanted a 17" WUXGA screen first and foremost. The cheapest Mac Book Pro with a 17" screen is nearly $3000.

    Now true it has a fast processor, high end graphics card, big disk drive, lots of memory but I don't need all of that. I was able to spec out a Dell that was plenty good enough for my needs for under $1500 even before taking the discount. The only way for me to get an Apple in that price range was to lose 30% off my most important feature.

    So while I would LOVE to get a Mac and while it would be nice to have ALL high end features to go with the high end screen it is not worth an extra $1500-$2000 for the privilege.

    So - the question stands. Can I run Mac OS on my new Dell PC?
     
  20. DomnizkyDesign macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 14, 2008
    #21
    "legal action undertaken by a company trying to prevent such discussions. "

    I love how "legal" contracts and agreements can bar us from "discussing" software. Doesn't that break a constitutional right somewhere? Or does that not apply in Silicon Valley?

    Note that what we're doing here isn't telling people to show up to some backalley somewhere where we'll install OS X into their Dells with dirty needles. We're talking about it. That's it.

    Are a few people talking truly that dangerous?
     
  21. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004
    Location:
    On the Left Coast - Victoria BC Canada
    #22
    It is the MacRumors site owner's perogative to set whatever terms he wishes for participation here.

    One of the terms is that 'how to' information on warez, serial cracking, and software piracy are not to be discussed or linked to.

    It's easy to imagine that this is necessary to keep the MacRumors site from attracting legal liability from the copyright owners. So yes, a few people talking could be dangerous to MR.

    But really, the site owner does not have to have a reason, nor explain it. Those are the rules, abide by them or move the discussion to somewhere else.
     
  22. err404 macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2007
    #23
    The problem with this specific topic is that it is hard to have a meaningful discussion w/o getting into details of proprietary binaries or linking to modified kernels/code.
    MacRumors is not setup for this kind of discussion. For a forum to allow such topics would require real legal advice on patten law, copyright law and the DMCA at a minimum.
    If you want to find a forum to freely discuss this topic, well Google is your friend.

    BTW - Even w/o the EULA, this would be a tricky subject to allow since circumventing the hardware checks is clearly in DMCA territory.
     
  23. Matek macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2007
    #24
    That's an entirely different thing. Copyright laws are quite clear and making an unauthorised copy of OS X is just as illegal as copying a Britney Spears CD, it's agains the law. Therefore discussing would be a discussion about breaking the law (MR could be in trouble if they "helped" people with that, sure).

    EULA, on the other hand, isn't the law. Apple could say (in the EULA) you are not allowed to whistle while using Software Update on Tuesdays and you could technically be in trouble if you did it. But that doesn't mean discussing whistling is wrong in any way.
     
  24. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Location:
    In the velcro closure of America's Hat
    #25
    It use to be a no-no on this site but since the iPhone/touch came out and lots of jailbreaking, the discussion of hackintoshes seems to be more accepted around here. For the real skinny, you have to go to insanelymac, however. They are the hackintosh experts.
     

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