Canon Rebel XSi

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by nicque, Jul 28, 2009.

  1. nicque macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2006
    #1
    I'm looking for a nice beginners dslr and have set my eyes on this camera.
    Does anyone know of any good sites withe good prices. Thanks.
     
  2. thegoldenmackid macrumors 604

    thegoldenmackid

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    Location:
    dallas, texas
    #2
    I have no problem with B&H. Amazon? If you are looking for a package one of those might be a good idea.
     
  3. gatepc macrumors 6502

    gatepc

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2008
    Location:
    Pittsburgh PA
    #3
    amazon is probably the cheapest your going to get it. If I was you I would get it as a Body only version and then pick up a 50mm 1.8 lens for another 100 dollars or so.
     
  4. dubels macrumors 6502

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    Aug 9, 2006
    #4
    Good advice^^ Another option is look at used options. Kit lenses are not the greatest. With the Xsi your lucky because Canon makes a nice cheap 50 f1.8. But if you want a zoom look at something in the 18-75 range. Right now I have a 35-75, and a 18-200 but right now I am really looking for a prime lens such as the 50 or a 35 but the Nikon options are pricey.
     
  5. miloblithe macrumors 68020

    miloblithe

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2003
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #5
    Bad advice^^^

    Canon's new 18-55 IS (and definitely make sure it's IS, which is Image Stabilization) is a nice lens. Of course it's not as sharp as a prime lens or have as wide an aperture, but it's a much more versatile lens and for a beginner, it's a good choice considering the camera is $600 for the body only (bhphotovideo) vs. $690 for the camera and the lens. For $90, there is absolutely nothing else that comes close. Any superior lens (or combination of lenses) that covers a similar range of focal lengths will cost you at least $300.

    By all means, if you have the funds, get the 50mm f/1.8 as well. Very nice lens. It'll give you a lens that's superior to the 18-55 for portraits and low-light applications.

    http://the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/Canon-EF-S-18-55mm-f-3.5-5.6-IS-Lens-Review.aspx
     
  6. JFreak macrumors 68040

    JFreak

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2003
    Location:
    Tampere, Finland
    #6
    If you need to ask, here's what I always recommend:

    1)
    Find a 2nd hand body dirt cheap from eBay or local camera store. Shouldn't cost many hundreds.

    2)
    Buy a new 50mm f/1.8 for about $100

    Then learn to use it and take photos using the tools you have, including "foot zoom". Once you know better, you know what you want to buy and will better accept the price of new equipment.

    If you worry about losing money in the process, here's some peace of mind:

    a) If you buy a new body, its value loses few hundred dollars while you learn. This would be the same price you probably would buy for the used body. So you can think of the used body as a dispensable learning tool, once it breaks it's time to buy a new one. Plus your initial investment is cheaper.

    b) The 50mm f/1.8 is dirt cheap even as new. It is made of plastic and feels like a toy, but takes good pictures. For its price there is no other lens that performs as good as it does. And for its price, it also can be considered dispensable; if it breaks, it does not break your wallet to buy another one.

    c) The only lenses that really hold their value are the L series lenses, which are too expensive for you at this point. Learn photography first and then if you want to, take a plunge and shoot happy.

    d) Camera bodies do not hold their value very well either. Even the top-of-the-line 1D models lose 50% rather quickly, and this would mean several thousand dollars of lost value. You'd better make some money with those tools, because after several years they also can be bought dirt cheap.

    To sum it up:
    - Buy cheap starter kit
    - LEARN
    - Buy better tools
    - Enjoy ;)
     
  7. toxic macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2008
    #7
    ugh. do NOT buy the 50/1.8 just because it's cheap. when buying prime lenses, buy based on focal length. the lens must fit your style, not the other way around. 50mm is often too specialized a lens for an only prime on an XSi or similar camera. it was my most useless lens when i had a 30D.

    anyways, Amazon probably has the best price. the kit lens (18-55 IS) is very good optically, especially considering it's only worth about $150. you should also consider getting a used, older body like an XTi or XT from a forum, craigslist, or ebay for a little bit cheaper. their kit lens is pretty poor, though, so you'll have to search for and buy another lens separately.
     
  8. telecomm macrumors 65816

    telecomm

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2003
    Location:
    Rome
    #8
    I agree with miloblithe (and toxic, who posted as I was writing this) get the kit zoom to start with.

    Primes are great, and you'll probably find yourself getting one at some point, but what focal range do you use most often? If you're just starting out with a DSLR, you probably have no idea. Maybe after shooting with the 18-55mm you'll decide you want a lens with a longer range. Maybe you'll want a wide angle lens. Who knows.
     
  9. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #9
    Just get the kit lens, the IS version is much better than the previous kit lens. Also, 50mm on the XSi sensor is actually an 80mm equivalent this negating most of the advantages of a 50mm focal length lens. Just because it's cheap doesn't mean it's good, and the 50mm f1.8's autofocus fails miserably in any kind of adverse lighting conditions.
     
  10. JFreak macrumors 68040

    JFreak

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2003
    Location:
    Tampere, Finland
    #10
    Focal range is only one side of the story; using a (relatively) fast prime (f/1.8) allows one to experiment more. It is far more useful skill to learn using different apertures because (almost) all of us have already had experienced different focal lengths using a point-and-shooter.

    Having a prime (fixed focal length) lens also makes it one less moving part in the equation of learning photography. Using that suggested 50mm lens makes it very clear to the young padawan learner whether one needs to have to buy a wider angle lens or a telephoto lens next.

    Just my opinion, though.
     
  11. soLoredd macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2007
    Location:
    California
    #11
    Well, the XSi was my first dSLR and I went with the kit from Amazon and then picked up the 50mm. The 50 has definitely helped in my picture taking but it's also got its drawbacks to learning, in my opinion. I vote the kit as well. And then save up for a Speedlite flash. They help immensely.
     
  12. Chasb macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2007
    #12
    ****

    I would check http://www.slickdeals.net/ a couple times a day.

    You can enter the camera type in their search or click on "Hot Topics" and then click on "Thread Started" so it goes in order of post. The yellow thumbs up means that overall response is very good - red thumbs down means it's not. As always, if you're dealing with an online merchant other than Amazon, Newegg, Crutchfield, etc be sure to check out http://www.resellerratings.com/ to make sure they are legit. Too many fly-by-nights selling strip down, grey-market cameras below wholesale.

    Thanks to Slickdeals, I was able to get my XSi kit with an additional 55-250 IS lens $209 cheaper on Amazon. Also keep in mind Square Trade warranties if you want to cover it for accidental damage. http://www.resellerratings.com/store/SquareTrade I was able to get a 3 year extended warranty with ADH for $80.00 (after coupon) Another slick deal.

    Take care
     
  13. nicque thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2006
    #13
    Thanks everybody. I'm gonna order the Rebel XSi kit from Amazon later tonight as it is only 600. I would get the other lens but I have limited budget as of now. I'll probably look into it around Christmas.
     
  14. nicque thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2006
    #14
    I also happen to have a Canon Speedlite 188a, some lenses from an old Canon slr, some uv protectors and a vivitar 2 in 1 video lenses. Will these work on the Rebel?
     
  15. HBOC macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Location:
    SLC
    #15
    absolutely, as long as they are EOS mount. If they are FD, then you will need to get an FD to EOS adapter, but I do believe that you lose autofocus abilities, but i am not sure.
     
  16. Snowbound macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 19, 2008
    #16
    Yep...this is true. And unless you have VERY nice FD lenses, it's probably not worth it. If you have EOS, lucky you!
     
  17. ftaok macrumors 601

    ftaok

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2002
    Location:
    East Coast
    #17
    Double check the compatibility on the flash before using it. I don't know for sure, but I've read where older flashes run on higher voltages and can fry modern dSLRs.

    Worth a check before using.

    ft
     
  18. JFreak macrumors 68040

    JFreak

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    Jul 11, 2003
    Location:
    Tampere, Finland
    #18
    That's right! Better buy modern models...
     
  19. nicque thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2006
    #19
    Alright thanks, is there an adapter that you recommend?
     
  20. gkarris macrumors 604

    gkarris

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2004
    Location:
    "No escape from Reality..."
    #20
    I use Fotodiox adapters (for Canon and Olympus). They have a store on eBay and their N.A. office/distribution is just up in Waukegan (north of Chicago).

    They have several versions of their EOS adapters, from the basic one (what I have), a Focus Verification version, and a "Pro" version (sturdier for heavier lenses).

    Enjoy your Canon!
     
  21. toxic macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2008
    #21
    Canon FD and FL-mount lenses are not worth the hassle of converting. The adapters are essentially teleconverters, meaning there's glass, meaning the performance of your lenses is dependent on the quality of the glass in the adapter. Good FD-EF adapters are rare and expensive.

    For any other mount (Yashica, Contax Zeiss, Nikkor, M42, OM...), there's a cheap adapter somewhere. More expensive ones will have an AF confirm chip. Think that's what Fotodiox has.

    However, you have to keep in mind that the focus screens of DSLRs, and the viewfinders of modern consumer-level SLRs are not very useful for manual focus, unless your lenses are f/4 or slower or you only shoot at f/4 or slower.
     
  22. gkarris macrumors 604

    gkarris

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2004
    Location:
    "No escape from Reality..."
    #22
    I think you're confused.

    Canon and Olympus (well, the 4/3 system which includes Panasonic) are the only dSLR's that are manufactured with bodies thin enough to not have any need for corrective optics in the adapters. I lucked out when I found that out with the 2 systems I went with.... :D

    I have only the Nikon-F to EOS and Nikon-F to 4/3 adapters. I don't have the AF confirm (wanted to go budget).

    I have used Nikon and Zeiss lenses on all my cameras and have had no problems with focusing. You just have to make sure you use the "stepped down" manual focusing (focus wide-open then choose your aperture).
     
  23. HBOC macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Location:
    SLC
    #23
    there are also some awesome FD L lenses as well. They are still relatively expensive..
     
  24. madmaxmedia macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2003
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #24
    I think he was correct, but not quite clear enough in his post.

    The Canon FD to EOS adapters require glass, because those bodies were even thinner than current Canon EF system.

    But most other lens mounts can be used on Canon EF with simple adapters w/ no glass, as you say. I bought a cheap Leica R to Canon adapter with AF confirmation for about $30.

    Manual focusing accuracy on Canon will depend on the body, your eyesight, and your skill level. Getting critical focus on the Rebels is extremely challenging IMO at wider apertures. I'm thinking about picking up a focusing screen for mine. Even relying on the AF confirmation light can be very hit-miss, again at wider apertures (f2.)

     
  25. gkarris macrumors 604

    gkarris

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2004
    Location:
    "No escape from Reality..."
    #25
    Okay, thanks for clarification.

    No focusing problems on my Canon 20D or either of my Olympus...
     

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