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marcusalwayswins

macrumors regular
Original poster
May 23, 2021
224
26
Hi Guys,

An absolute first timer trying to Purchase a Mac ever in my Life. And I am literally tearing my hair apart thinking which configuration to buy as I am mighty confused.

So I am Planning to buy the newly released M2 Mac Mini and I have one question to ask you guys, almost everyone has been telling me that even if someone is a budget buyer it is always advisable to buy atleast 16GB of RAM and 512 GB of SSD because of the 2 NAND Chip in the 512 GB SSD vs 1 in 256GB SSD. As the extra 512 GB SSD which has the 2 NAND Chip makes the exchange of Data between the SSD and RAM faster and hence the net result is a faster working computer.

My question to you guys is now when I am just about thinking to buy a M2 Mac Mini I can only afford to buy 16GB of RAM and 256GB of SSD because someone is sponsoring my purchase and I can't really further ask him to bear the cost of the additional SSD of going from 256GB to 512 GB SSD

I am mostly a Mid Level Power user meaning occasionally video editing (Just occasionally that too not professional level I am not a YouTuber) but yes I am a Affinity Photo Power User. But other wise just normal web browsing, using emails and watching YouTube and movies. But yes, I do want to future prof myself against all the Future MAC OS that might be coming out at least for another 4 Years. So do you guys really think I should be buying the 512 GB SSD because of faster data transfer and exchange between the RAM and SSD because of the 512 GB SDD. Do you guys think for a mId level Power user like me would it make any difference. ? Will the 16GB of RAM and 256GB SSD will it not suffice my kind of user needs.

Before you tell me that go for the Base Level Mac Mini that should also work in your case LIke I said, I could have also gone for the base level Mac Mini but I want to future proof my purchase against future Software OS Updates that Apple may release for Mac OS and hence my decision from 8GB RAM to 16GB RAM what do you guys feel will I be ok with 16GB RAM and 256 GB SSD ? Or will the extra 512 GB SSD that will indeed make a noticable difference

Can you please tell me?

TIA !
 
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espacioami

macrumors member
Nov 10, 2022
32
18
I think that the basic (8/256) would cover your needs (I understand that you are not a professional). However, and given that you can't upgrade the RAM, having 16GB is a good inversion.

The ideal would be 512 SSD. With respect to the 256 SSD models there will be ( expectedly) a significant difference in synthetic tests (Blackmagic) but not so much in day to day use. In the future you can always buy an external drive and cover your needs.

Just an opinion and i know, buying gives headaches!
 
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marcusalwayswins

macrumors regular
Original poster
May 23, 2021
224
26
I think that the basic (8/256) would cover your needs (I understand that you are not a professional). However, and given that you can't upgrade the RAM, having 16GB is a good inversion.

The ideal would be 512 SSD. With respect to the 256 SSD models there will be ( expectedly) a significant difference in synthetic tests (Blackmagic) but not so much in day to day use. In the future you can always buy an external drive and cover your needs.

Just an opinion and i know, buying gives headaches!
But it is just not for having extra storage I am getting to hear this again and again that an extra 512GB SD also kind of works as an additional RAM like a Nitro Engine to your Car. And hence I am worried.
 
Delay the purchase for a week or two, take even a minimum wage job to "create" the difference of 512GB vs. 256GB and then buy 512GB.

"Power users" should not be fixated on the least possible spend when they know that a bit more adds speed (and thus power). If me, maybe I work that job for 4 or 5 weeks to step up that FAST Apple SSD to 1TB, 2TB or even 4TB. It is VERY FAST SSD which will make that occasional video editing and/other "power" uses that much faster vs.- say- shifting some of that to external hardware.

And since "power" is also maximized with RAM, I'm probably going 32GB RAM vs. 16GB by saving up a bit more for that too. RAM is where the work gets done. In Silicon Macs, that's where BOTH the brains and graphics processing gets done. Too much RAM is much better than too little RAM. Too little RAM will be trying to swap in out of the SSD to make up a demand difference. With too little SSD, you just slow the whole task work down.

SSD is not like a "nitro engine." When RAM demand exceeds RAM, SSD is pulled in kind of like spare RAM... but much slower than actual RAM. There are swaps being done in and out of RAM that temporarily use SSD space. The best way to overcome this slowdown is MORE RAM so whatever you are doing rarely needs to use SSD swaps.

Lastly, "power" would beg for the PRO chip over the non-pro, where +$300 could max that out too.

When I assemble THAT Mac mini for Mid-level Power uses, I find myself at $2199 (with 1TB SSD). Then, I might apply my more economical mind to the consideration and hop into the refurb store to look at stepping up to M1 MAX in a "fat Mini" Mac Studio for around the same money. For a few hundred more at $2519 as I write this, I can get many more graphics cores, 32GB RAM and 2TB fastest Apple SSD. Or for a few hundred less at $1799, I can get 32GB 512GB M1 MAX to hit my upside SSD consideration I'm having with myself right now. M1 MAX should be better than M2 PRO but that is technically to be determined in objective testing since no one but Apple and friends of Apple have Mac Mini M2 yet.

Or while I save up a few more hundred to give me the ability to really consider such options, I keep watching the store for perhaps a M1 MAX Studio with at least 32GB and 1TB of Apple fast SSD for about that $2000-$2200 level. That would scratch all mid-power itches with plenty of RAM and a good amount of fast SSD for most efficiently doing those mid-power tasks... and those you may not yet anticipate over life of device.

I hope this helps you. You want mid-level power and "future proofing" which basically begs for skewing towards "MORE" vs. near minimums in 2023. Work a bit to build up some extra cash and buy yourself some of those "more" options. The cost difference could be covered with only a few weeks of work. Your ROI on that extra is realized over many years of use.
 
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marcusalwayswins

macrumors regular
Original poster
May 23, 2021
224
26
Delay the purchase for a week or two, take even a minimum wage job to "create" the difference of 512GB vs. 256GB and then buy 512GB.

"Power users" should not be fixated on the least possible spend when they know that a bit more adds speed (and thus power). If me, maybe I work that job for 4 or 5 weeks to step up that FAST Apple SSD to 1TB, 2TB or even 4TB. It is VERY FAST SSD which will make that occasional video editing and/other "power" uses that much faster vs.- say- shifting some of that to external hardware.

And since "power" is also maximized with RAM, I'm probably going 32GB RAM vs. 16GB by saving up a bit more for that too. RAM is where the work gets done. In Silicon Macs, that's where BOTH the brains and graphics processing gets done. Too much RAM is much better than too little RAM. Too little RAM will be trying to swap in out of the SSD to make up a demand difference. With too little SSD, you just slow the whole task work down.

Lastly, "power" would beg for the PRO chip over the non-pro, where +$300 could max that out too.

When I assemble THAT Mac mini for Mid-level Power uses, I find myself at $2199 (with 1TB SSD). Then, I might apply my more economical mind to the consideration and hop into the refurb store to look at stepping up to M1 MAX in a "fat Mini" Mac Studio for around the same money. For a few hundred more at $2519 as I write this, I can get many more graphics cores, 32GB RAM and 4TB fastest Apple SSD. Or for a few hundred less at $1799, I can get 32GB 512GB M1 MAX to hit my upside SSD consideration I'm having with myself right now. M1 MAX should be better than M2 PRO but that is technically to be determined in objective testing since no one but Apple and friends of Apple have Mac Mini M2 yet.

Or while I save up a few more hundred to give me the ability to really consider such options, I keep watching the store for perhaps a M1 MAX Studio with at least 32GB and 1TB- but probably ideally 2TB- of Apple fast SSD for about that $2000-$2200 level. That would scratch all Mid Power itches with plenty of RAM and a good amount of fast SSD for most efficiently doing those mid-power tasks.

I hope this helps you. You want mid-level power and "future proofing" which basically begs for skewing towards "MORE" vs. near minimums in 2023. Work a bit to build up some extra cash and buy yourself some of those "more" options. The cost difference could be covered with only a few weeks of work.

Please suggest according to what I have asked. How much can I spend, not just randomly what you think.
 

foo2

macrumors regular
Oct 26, 2007
128
80
I would focus on the 8GB/256GB Mac mini and then just upgrade again in 2-4 years. $499 edu is no joke, and Apple’s extra 8GB for $180 is insane. All the YouTube/etc. videos show people perfectly happy with 8GB of RAM.

This “half the speed, 256GB vs 512GB” is absurd. In a black magic benchmark, sure, there’s a difference. Otherwise, there isn’t. Most can’t even tell the difference between a fast NVME SSD and a decent old SATA SSD (at half to 1/3 the “crippled it’s so slow!” 256GB Mac SSD speeds).

Don’t buy the hype. Get a basic Mac mini, be happy, use it for a few years, dump it, and upgrade when there’s something significantly better. What’s out right now isn’t. Yes, it’s more cores, but unless you have an app that can actually use those ‘more cores’, they’re wasted. Wait for something that significantly improves the per core speed because that’s what you will feel in everyday use.

The direct answer to your question about Apple and OS support: Apple supports their stuff for about 7 years after release. Whether you buy 8GB or 16GB, I wouldn’t worry about that. You’ll get a long product life, and you can easily sell, lose very little money (because you’re spending very little money) and get something better in a few years.

Save your $.
 

marcusalwayswins

macrumors regular
Original poster
May 23, 2021
224
26
I would focus on the 8GB/256GB Mac mini and then just upgrade again in 2-4 years. $499 edu is no joke, and Apple’s extra 8GB for $180 is insane. All the YouTube/etc. videos show people perfectly happy with 8GB of RAM.

This “half the speed, 256GB vs 512GB” is absurd. In a black magic benchmark, sure, there’s a difference. Otherwise, there isn’t. Most can’t even tell the difference between a fast NVME SSD and a decent old SATA SSD (at half to 1/3 the “crippled it’s so slow!” 256GB Mac SSD speeds).

Don’t buy the hype. Get a basic Mac mini, be happy, use it for a few years, dump it, and upgrade when there’s something significantly better. What’s out right now isn’t. Yes, it’s more cores, but unless you have an app that can actually use those ‘more cores’, they’re wasted. Wait for something that significantly improves the per core speed because that’s what you will feel in everyday use.

The direct answer to your question about Apple and OS support: Apple supports their stuff for about 7 years after release. Whether you buy 8GB or 16GB, I wouldn’t worry about that. You’ll get a long product life, and you can easily sell, lose very little money (because you’re spending very little money) and get something better in a few years.

Save your $.
So you are saying I should not pay much attention to these theory of 2 Nand Chips in 512 GB also acting as indirect RAM ?
 

marcusalwayswins

macrumors regular
Original poster
May 23, 2021
224
26
I've posted this many times.

DO NOT buy any Mac (now) unless it has 16gb of RAM.
16gb is "the new 8".

You can live with the smaller SSD (by adding an external SSD).

But you CAN'T add "more RAM" later on.

Get 16gb of RAM and the 256gb SSD.
And what about this theory of 2 Nand Chips in 512 GB also acting as indirect RAM ? Which the 256 GB does not ?
 
Please suggest according to what I have asked. How much can I spend, not just randomly what you think.

That's what I did.

You offer ambiguous variables like "mid power user." Some might consider that to mean you need a base Mac Studio Ultra while others may argue that an M1 Mac Mini with minimum config will be enough. Both will be right through their own interpretation of what "mid power" really means.

I know first hand that ANY video editing will benefit from MORE RAM and MORE SSD (and more cores) than towards the minimums. Modest video editing tends to become more video editing over time as we learn to do new things in video editing.

Since you mention "future proofing" (also ambiguous because no one can know what you'll want to do with it in the future), there is an implication that as your pro skills grow you may want to do more than modest video editing and whatever you do now with Affinity Photo. Your own growth in power "skills" may be interpreted to mean you need more powerful "tools." This Mac will be the key tool for any of that.

If you only want input on 256GB vs. 512GB, based on what you've shared, I suggest 512GB. However, it's easy to imagine mid-power needs in 2024, 2025, 2026 growing into needing more than towards such minimums.

If you are only concerned with macOS upgrades vs. "future proofing," they should work fine at the bare minimum configurations they sell now for upwards of 5+ years. My input was future proofing vs. your own power skills growth over that time... all on assumptions of how such stuff usually goes as people learn to do more powerful things in those kinds of "power" tasks.

There is no upgrading RAM or cores later should you get to a point where you need them. SSD can be expanded with what is typically slower SSD in external enclosures. So if there is a compromise, that's the one. But again, for such little money, I'd simply save up some extra and "future proof" based on where my skills might grow in my power tasks. With Silicon, you have to try to anticipate that pretty much fully up front. When your skill growth demands more than a specific Silicon config can deliver, you have to basically dump the whole Mac and buy another.
 
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CBlakeston

macrumors 6502a
Jan 31, 2008
530
202
Hi Guys,

An absolute first timer trying to Purchase a Mac ever in my Life. And I am literally tearing my hair apart thinking which configuration to buy as I am mighty confused.

So I am Planning to buy the newly released M2 Mac Mini and I have one question to ask you guys, almost everyone has been telling me that even if someone is a budget buyer it is always advisable to buy atleast 16GB of RAM and 512 GB of SSD because of the 2 NAND Chip in the 512 GB SSD vs 1 in 256GB SSD. As the extra 512 GB SSD which has the 2 NAND Chip makes the exchange of Data between the SSD and RAM faster and hence the net result is a faster working computer.

My question to you guys is now when I am just about thinking to buy a M2 Mac Mini I can only afford to buy 16GB of RAM and 256GB of SSD because someone is sponsoring my purchase and I can't really further ask him to bear the cost of the additional SSD of going from 256GB to 512 GB SSD

I am mostly a Mid Level Power user meaning occasionally video editing (Just occasionally that too not professional level I am not a YouTuber) but yes I am a Affinity Photo Power User. But other wise just normal web browsing, using emails and watching YouTube and movies. But yes, I do want to future prof myself against all the Future MAC OS that might be coming out at least for another 4 Years. So do you guys really think I should be buying the 512 GB SSD because of faster data transfer and exchange between the RAM and SSD because of the 512 GB SDD. Do you guys think for a mId level Power user like me would it make any difference. ? Will the 16GB of RAM and 256GB SSD will it not suffice my kind of user needs.

Before you tell me that go for the Base Level Mac Mini that should also work in your case LIke I said, I could have also gone for the base level Mac Mini but I want to future proof my purchase against future Software OS Updates that Apple may release for Mac OS and hence my decision from 8GB RAM to 16GB RAM what do you guys feel will I be ok with 16GB RAM and 256 GB SSD ? Or will the extra 512 GB SSD that will indeed make a noticable difference

Can you please tell me?

TIA !

I have a base model MacBook Air M1 8GB 256GB.

I daily edit 4K / 8K cinema quality footage and 45 megapixel photos in lightroom and photoshop.

95% of people don’t need more then the base model. If I was going to get an M2 (and we don’t know if the ram chips are split on the new M2 systems yet) the only thing I’d consider upgrading is to 512gb if the split thing is the case. That would make bigger difference than jumping to 16GB.

Try not to get caught up in the speeds and feeds.
 

KeepCalmPeople

macrumors 65816
Sep 5, 2012
1,367
510
Los Angeles, California
With regard to future proofing, I would echo what one or two others have said here. When Apple stops supporting a product, the memory/storage configuration of the product is not a factor. When they stop MacOS updates for the M2 Mac mini (2023), it will be stopped for all configurations of that model.
The whole 8GB vs 16GB and 256GB vs 512GB comes down to small percentage improvements in speed, which you are unlikely to feel unless you are a full-time video/photo editor in my opinion. Having said that, if you MUST upgrade, increase the memory over the SSD.
 
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MacintoshDan

macrumors 6502
Sep 24, 2013
361
148
I ordered a base model with 16GB RAM. I am coming from a 27in 5k iMac with a fusion drive. I am sure the base storage will still be much faster then what I have now, and I don't need extra space, my current iMac is only using 159GB
 

gpat

macrumors 65816
Mar 1, 2011
1,332
2,604
Italy
I'm using a borrowed M1 8GB Mac right now and 8GB is puny for desktop usage.
Easily slows down and beachballs if you multitask a lot on a big monitor.
In 2023, 8GB is okay maybe for single tasking on a small laptop screen.
And yes Apple is most definitely selling the 8GB SKUs to force users either to upsell right away or to early upgrade later on. Pick your poison.
They're selling a good product but when you see a $499 Edu mac mini and $200 to upgrade the RAM (material cost of the RAM: $50 at most) you know you're getting on the receiving party of really good marketing.
Just know what you are buying.
 
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foo2

macrumors regular
Oct 26, 2007
128
80
I have a base model MacBook Air M1 8GB 256GB.

I daily edit 4K / 8K cinema quality footage and 45 megapixel photos in lightroom and photoshop.

95% of people don’t need more then the base model. If I was going to get an M2 (and we don’t know if the ram chips are split on the new M2 systems yet) the only thing I’d consider upgrading is to 512gb if the split thing is the case. That would make bigger difference than jumping to 16GB.

Try not to get caught up in the speeds and feeds.

Are you aware of a use case where there is a material difference between the 256GB model and the 512GB model speeds at doing anything save Blackmagic benchmarks?
 
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foo2

macrumors regular
Oct 26, 2007
128
80
So you are saying I should not pay much attention to these theory of 2 Nand Chips in 512 GB also acting as indirect RAM ?
That's correct. It's a complete waste of time unless there are benchmarks showing a material impact in applications that you heavily use. Nobody runs BlackMagic benchmarks all day for their work.

Given what you describe and what we've all seen on Reddit/YouTube/etc. about the success and speed of "even" the 8GB/256GB model, I think you'll be fine with the base model.
 

foo2

macrumors regular
Oct 26, 2007
128
80
I don't want to rain on the parade of those buying the 16GB memory upgrade, merely I suggest that for those who don't know they need it, likely they do not. For some, there are benefits to having 16GB. The one case I can think of right now (lol!) is Baldur's Gate 3, where the developer clearly says the 16GB version allows 4k/high graphics, whereas the 8GB version (of the normal M1 configuration) only is suggested with medium settings.

There can be a use case for more memory. I'm just saying unless you know what that use case is, look at the 8GB / 256GB model first. It's dirt cheap ($499 edu...) and if you don't like it, you can always return it and upgrade.
 

foo2

macrumors regular
Oct 26, 2007
128
80
I know first hand that ANY video editing will benefit from MORE RAM and MORE SSD (and more cores) than towards the minimums. Modest video editing tends to become more video editing over time as we learn to do new things in video editing.

It is?

The chart shows almost no difference.

What operations are materially better with more memory and SSD?
 

mcnallym

macrumors 6502a
Oct 28, 2008
887
471
In the MacBook Air the then the 256Gb SSD with single flash chip is still 1550Mbps so whilst slower it is still not a slow SSD.

Outside of Benchmarks you won’t find an actual issue whilst working.

Put it this way if you do then would want the M2 Pro rather then base M2 anyway.

16gb RAM will serve you better then extra storage and you can always add a decent external SSD in USB-C caddy to provide extra space, but cannot add memory later.
 

foo2

macrumors regular
Oct 26, 2007
128
80
There is no upgrading RAM or cores later should you get to a point where you need them. SSD can be expanded with what is typically slower SSD in external enclosures. So if there is a compromise, that's the one. But again, for such little money, I'd simply save up some extra and "future proof" based on where my skills might grow in my power tasks. With Silicon, you have to try to anticipate that pretty much fully up front. When your skill growth demands more than a specific Silicon config can deliver, you have to basically dump the whole Mac and buy another.
But in a year or two (when one might have those superior skills and desire for something faster) Apple will have a machine that will be ($just-as-much-money-or-cheaper) with (%-increase-in-performance-year-over-year).

The obvious thing to do would be (IF there's a desire for something faster) to simply sell the Mac and get a new one. That way you keep the money in your pocket until you actually need to spend it.

Again let me say I feel "futureproofing" for a consumer electronics device is silly. They are a commodity product; buy what you need now, and IF you need more later, buy it then. It will undoubtedly be better, faster, cheaper, easier, and more advanced in a year or two, with all kinds of new features you're likely to want.
 
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CBlakeston

macrumors 6502a
Jan 31, 2008
530
202
Are you aware of a use case where there is a material difference between the 256GB model and the 512GB model speeds at doing anything save Blackmagic benchmarks?
With the M2 MacBook Air unless you’re hitting it hard not especially. Bu assuming that holds for the Mac mini also I’m sure you’d be fine. But if you did want to spend money on an upgrade I’d double the storage to 512 to speed up drive access.
 

meson

macrumors 6502
Apr 29, 2014
289
232
Your use of Affinity Photo seems to be the big question. The 8/256 machine will handle the rest without breaking a sweat (and very likely everything you are asking of the machine). What are you currently editing with? How much RAM does it have? Are you running into slowdowns in your workflow due to excessive swap? Are these slowdowns long enough that it truly detracts from your work, or are you simply experiencing longer times producing your final product?

With the prices Apple charges for upgrades, future proofing is more of an exercise in lining Apple's wallet. Some upgrades cost as much or more than a base model machine, and unless you are running your machine at full tilt 24/7, so many of the tests designed to 'stress' the M1 series Macs have differences of minutes between base model and high end configurations.

As mentioned, the SSD speed is the last thing I would worry about in a new machine. Back in the days of spinning HDDs, speed improvements were felt in everyday tasks. Once I started using SATA III SSDs for internal/external booting of 2012/2013 era machines, I've never noticed the difference much aside from boot times or when deliberately moving single large files. If I were spending someone else's money on the machine, the storage is the one corner I'd cut. You can always use external storage.

Here's a little food for thought. For my wife's 2019 iMac and even her base model 8/256 M1 MacBook Air (not originally intended for editing, but the one she uses most these days), I format an external SSD for her and map it to be used as Photoshop's scratch space, and her workflow chugs along swapping away at speeds she doesn't complain about.

It's not uncommon for her to open a batch of 100 or more photos to apply actions and adjustments in bulk. She likes to overshoot and overdeliver on the initial batch of proofs, just in case there is that quintessential look from the subject that she may be tempted to toss for one reason or another. Then she will go back and individually edit some of the best and/or requested images. I'm not sure I could provider her any amount of RAM that will prevent her from thrashing a disk (at least not at a price she is willing to spend).

She's also not one to close things down while working, so she'll have Photoshop, Lightroom, Bridge, browsers with several tabs, a video stream, email, messages, etc. open at once.

After you answer my initial batch of questions, ask yourself "Will my use of RAM+swap space fit into 16GB when I ask the most from my machine?" If yes, then 16GB of RAM is an excellent choice, as your machine can run full bore without swapping. If not, you are going to thrash the drive anyway, ask yourself, "Can I fit all I need plus the swap space I need in 256GB of storage?" If the answer to the second question is NO, then you will need to prioritize storage over RAM for your usage. Yes you may write lots to the storage, but that is the compromise you need with your budget. If the answer to the first question is NO, but the second YES, then prioritize the RAM over storage to minimize the abuse. An SSD is not an old Zip drive disk that is going to corrupt the file the third time you overwrite it. It will likely take many years worth of continuous writes before you need to worry about a failure.

I recently bought myself a 16/256 M1 Mini. I chose to prioritize RAM over storage.
 

NewUsername

macrumors 6502a
Aug 20, 2019
527
1,085
Hi Guys,

An absolute first timer trying to Purchase a Mac ever in my Life. And I am literally tearing my hair apart thinking which configuration to buy as I am mighty confused.

So I am Planning to buy the newly released M2 Mac Mini and I have one question to ask you guys, almost everyone has been telling me that even if someone is a budget buyer it is always advisable to buy atleast 16GB of RAM and 512 GB of SSD because of the 2 NAND Chip in the 512 GB SSD vs 1 in 256GB SSD. As the extra 512 GB SSD which has the 2 NAND Chip makes the exchange of Data between the SSD and RAM faster and hence the net result is a faster working computer.

My question to you guys is now when I am just about thinking to buy a M2 Mac Mini I can only afford to buy 16GB of RAM and 256GB of SSD because someone is sponsoring my purchase and I can't really further ask him to bear the cost of the additional SSD of going from 256GB to 512 GB SSD

I am mostly a Mid Level Power user meaning occasionally video editing (Just occasionally that too not professional level I am not a YouTuber) but yes I am a Affinity Photo Power User. But other wise just normal web browsing, using emails and watching YouTube and movies. But yes, I do want to future prof myself against all the Future MAC OS that might be coming out at least for another 4 Years. So do you guys really think I should be buying the 512 GB SSD because of faster data transfer and exchange between the RAM and SSD because of the 512 GB SDD. Do you guys think for a mId level Power user like me would it make any difference. ? Will the 16GB of RAM and 256GB SSD will it not suffice my kind of user needs.

Before you tell me that go for the Base Level Mac Mini that should also work in your case LIke I said, I could have also gone for the base level Mac Mini but I want to future proof my purchase against future Software OS Updates that Apple may release for Mac OS and hence my decision from 8GB RAM to 16GB RAM what do you guys feel will I be ok with 16GB RAM and 256 GB SSD ? Or will the extra 512 GB SSD that will indeed make a noticable difference

Can you please tell me?

TIA !
I would get the base model. Either upgrade costs you 1/3 of the base price and the performance difference is something you will rarely notice (if ever).

Getting extra storage is a bit questionable on a desktop because you can just connect an external SSD (which you’ll probably do anyway), but it does make file management a bit easier.

RAM upgrades are expensive and a bit overrated, but it’s true that 8GB is not a lot, and in case of very heavy multitasking you might see some slowdowns, but in that situation you can also just close some windows.

I’m not saying those upgrades are bad, but there are other things you can spend money on.
 

foo2

macrumors regular
Oct 26, 2007
128
80
With the M2 MacBook Air unless you’re hitting it hard not especially. Bu assuming that holds for the Mac mini also I’m sure you’d be fine. But if you did want to spend money on an upgrade I’d double the storage to 512 to speed up drive access.
#Confused

If you agree there's no material difference in speeds outside of BlackMagic for most users, why list the reason of "to speed up drive access" as a reason to jump from 256GB to 512GB?
 
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