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CES 2017: Incipio's 'Kiddy Lock' Case for iPhone 7 Keeps Kids From Accessing Home Button

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Incipio today introduced a new Kiddy Lock Case for the iPhone 7 and the iPhone 7 Plus, which is designed to prevent children from accessing the Home button on the two devices with a sliding cover and a secure latch.

The Kiddy Lock Case fully covers the Home button and renders it inaccessible, preventing kids from opening apps, accessing Touch ID functionality, making phone calls, and more. It's ideal for parents who hand their phones over to kids to play games, but don't want them accessing other features on the device.

"With the abundance of child-friendly tech toys these days, children still seem to find your personal devices the most appealing," said Carlos Del Toro, Director of Products, Incipio. "Inspired by our customers, the design of the Kiddy LockTM Case provides caregivers and parents alike a piece-of-mind knowing they're still in control of their personal device, even when in the hands of children."
Incipio made the case from a tough, shock-absorbing material to keep the iPhone safe from accidental drops, and a raised bezel protects the screen. There's also a built-in kickstand for use when viewing TV shows or movies.

The Kiddy Lock Case will be available during the first quarter of 2017 for $39.99, and it will come in Black, Cyan, Purple, Magenta, and Pink. Customers considering the Kiddy Lock Case should be aware that Apple offers Guided Access, a built-in tool for preventing access to the Home button and other iPhone features. Guided Access is a free accessibility feature that can be turned on in the Settings app.

Alongside the Kiddy Lock Case, Incipio is also introducing the Incipio ONE Dynamic Case Ecosystem for the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus. The Incipio One features a range of interchangeable back plates that can be used with a base iPhone 7 case.


Back plates include a leather Card Holder able to store two credit cards and an ID, a 3,000 mAh battery bank, a Qi Wireless Charging module, a Style Plate in several finishes and colors, and a leather Style Plate Premium.

The ONE ecosystem will be available during the first quarter of 2017. The base case will be priced at $39.99 and the accessory plates will be available at prices ranging from $19.99 to $39.99.

Article Link: CES 2017: Incipio's 'Kiddy Lock' Case for iPhone 7 Keeps Kids From Accessing Home Button
 

natevandam

macrumors newbie
Jan 5, 2017
7
30
Guided Access. I just triple click the home button and hand my phone/ipad to my daughter to watch a show on netflix. I have the screen disabled, so she can't tap anything. Buttons disabled so she can't change the volume or activate siri. And even the rotation is locked so she can't accidentally flip the screen and get frustrated everything is upside down.
 
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the-msa

macrumors 6502
Oct 24, 2013
414
201
hm. judging by my 2.5 year old and a couple others that i've seen, that certaily wouldnt stop them freeing the home button.
 
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Chupa Chupa

macrumors G5
Jul 16, 2002
14,834
7,394
Right because kids will never figure that one out. And with Touch ID why is blocking the home button even helpful? If the phone is unlocked then you can swipe pages. It seems to me if this was a real problem Apple would add page lock functionality to phones. But all the parents I know don't let their kids play with their phones. The young kids have iPod Touches and the older ones have their own phone.
 
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iMerik

macrumors 6502a
May 3, 2011
603
444
Upper Midwest
Guided Access. I just triple click the home button and hand my phone/ipad to my daughter to watch a show on netflix. I have the screen disabled, so she can't tap anything. Buttons disabled so she can't change the volume or activate siri. And even the rotation is locked so she can't accidentally flip the screen and get frustrated everything is upside down.
MacRumors should do its readers a service and actually mention Guided Access and detail its use as an alternative to what amounts to an advertisement article. Readers shouldn't have to rely on comments to learn what the author should have obviously stated.
 
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Corrode

macrumors 6502a
Dec 26, 2008
990
2,119
Calgary, AB
Guided Access. I just triple click the home button and hand my phone/ipad to my daughter to watch a show on netflix. I have the screen disabled, so she can't tap anything. Buttons disabled so she can't change the volume or activate siri. And even the rotation is locked so she can't accidentally flip the screen and get frustrated everything is upside down.
This product is dead on arrival. Don't they do research? Isn't that step 1?
 
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Amadeo

macrumors regular
Jul 11, 2008
103
66
MacRumors should do its readers a service and actually mention Guided Access and detail its use as an alternative to what amounts to an advertisement article. Readers shouldn't have to rely on comments to learn what the author should have obviously stated.
100%. I also use Guided Access. To someone else's point, this seems like it was made by the ignorant for the gullible, and Macrumors really should call that out in some fashion. Otherwise this kind of looks like a "you scratch my back, I scratch yours" post orchestrated with the PR folks at Incipio.
 
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Somian

macrumors regular
Feb 15, 2011
178
194
Santa Clara, CA
Aside from the mentioned guided access already existing:

Physically locking the home button can't work because iOS apps tend to crash and thus will get you back to the home screen regardless.
 
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macduke

macrumors G4
Jun 27, 2007
11,159
15,121
Central U.S.
It's too bad more parents don't know about guided access. It works really well and you can simply disable whatever hardware buttons and gestures you want, as well as draw over areas of the display that you don't want them to press. This is really useful for games where you don't want them to accidentally quit and get stuck in a menu. I don't let my kids use my iPhone, but I let my daughter, who is old enough now, play some educational games on the iPad for about 20 minutes every other day or so. With guided access, this case isn't worth it, and beyond that I'm sure they'll find a way in with a case vs. guided access, which uses a passcode.
 
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Shirasaki

macrumors G4
May 16, 2015
10,285
4,110
Actually, when you enable guided access, home button still works, although disabling it requires triple click.
With this case, children might find no way to even activate "enter passcode" page at all, further preventing them from disabling guided access.
Aside from the mentioned guided access already existing:

Physically locking the home button can't work because iOS apps tend to crash and thus will get you back to the home screen regardless.
Hmm. Good point. I wonder what the iOS would react when app crashes. Could children tap other apps and use them?
 
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Jenjo

macrumors newbie
Jan 5, 2017
5
0

I have a 2.5 & a 4 year old and I LOVE this idea!! Would definitely stop him from turning off movies, games, etc. I think it's genius!! It's such a simple idea that will save me major frustrations!! Awesome!!

Incipio today introduced a new Kiddy Lock Case for the iPhone 7 and the iPhone 7 Plus, which is designed to prevent children from accessing the Home button on the two devices with a sliding cover and a secure latch.

The Kiddy Lock Case fully covers the Home button and renders it inaccessible, preventing kids from opening apps, accessing Touch ID functionality, making phone calls, and more. It's ideal for parents who hand their phones over to kids to play games, but don't want them accessing other features on the device.

Incipio made the case from a tough, shock-absorbing material to keep the iPhone safe from accidental drops, and a raised bezel protects the screen. There's also a built-in kickstand for use when viewing TV shows or movies.

The Kiddy Lock Case will be available during the first quarter of 2017 for $39.99, and it will come in Black, Cyan, Purple, Magenta, and Pink.

Alongside the Kiddy Lock Case, Incipio is also introducing the Incipio ONE Dynamic Case Ecosystem for the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus. The Incipio One features a range of interchangeable back plates that can be used with a base iPhone 7 case.


Back plates include a leather Card Holder able to store two credit cards and an ID, a 3,000 mAh battery bank, a Qi Wireless Charging module, a Style Plate in several finishes and colors, and a leather Style Plate Premium.

The ONE ecosystem will be available during the first quarter of 2017. The base case will be priced at $39.99 and the accessory plates will be available at prices ranging from $19.99 to $39.99.

Article Link: CES 2017: Incipio's 'Kiddy Lock' Case for iPhone 7 Keeps Kids From Accessing Home Button
[doublepost=1483635049][/doublepost]
Right because kids will never figure that one out. And with Touch ID why is blocking the home button even helpful? If the phone is unlocked then you can swipe pages. It seems to me if this was a real problem Apple would add page lock functionality to phones. But all the parents I know don't let their kids play with their phones. The young kids have iPod Touches and the older ones have their own phone.
I completely disagree. It's a simple idea that will save a lot of frustrations! I have a 2.5 & 4 year old (both very smart) and this would be awesome for us!!
[doublepost=1483635623][/doublepost]



Incipio today introduced a new Kiddy Lock Case for the iPhone 7 and the iPhone 7 Plus, which is designed to prevent children from accessing the Home button on the two devices with a sliding cover and a secure latch.

The Kiddy Lock Case fully covers the Home button and renders it inaccessible, preventing kids from opening apps, accessing Touch ID functionality, making phone calls, and more. It's ideal for parents who hand their phones over to kids to play games, but don't want them accessing other features on the device.

Incipio made the case from a tough, shock-absorbing material to keep the iPhone safe from accidental drops, and a raised bezel protects the screen. There's also a built-in kickstand for use when viewing TV shows or movies.

The Kiddy Lock Case will be available during the first quarter of 2017 for $39.99, and it will come in Black, Cyan, Purple, Magenta, and Pink.

Alongside the Kiddy Lock Case, Incipio is also introducing the Incipio ONE Dynamic Case Ecosystem for the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus. The Incipio One features a range of interchangeable back plates that can be used with a base iPhone 7 case.


Back plates include a leather Card Holder able to store two credit cards and an ID, a 3,000 mAh battery bank, a Qi Wireless Charging module, a Style Plate in several finishes and colors, and a leather Style Plate Premium.

The ONE ecosystem will be available during the first quarter of 2017. The base case will be priced at $39.99 and the accessory plates will be available at prices ranging from $19.99 to $39.99.

Article Link: CES 2017: Incipio's 'Kiddy Lock' Case for iPhone 7 Keeps Kids From Accessing Home Button
Love this idea!!
 
Comment

jclo

Editor
Staff member
Dec 7, 2012
1,675
3,356
California
MacRumors should do its readers a service and actually mention Guided Access and detail its use as an alternative to what amounts to an advertisement article. Readers shouldn't have to rely on comments to learn what the author should have obviously stated.

I'm sorry. I do not have children and have not used Guided Access often, so I just didn't think of it. I've added a mention now. This is obviously not an advertisement and is just standard CES coverage.
 
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Jenjo

macrumors newbie
Jan 5, 2017
5
0



Incipio today introduced a new Kiddy Lock Case for the iPhone 7 and the iPhone 7 Plus, which is designed to prevent children from accessing the Home button on the two devices with a sliding cover and a secure latch.

The Kiddy Lock Case fully covers the Home button and renders it inaccessible, preventing kids from opening apps, accessing Touch ID functionality, making phone calls, and more. It's ideal for parents who hand their phones over to kids to play games, but don't want them accessing other features on the device.

Incipio made the case from a tough, shock-absorbing material to keep the iPhone safe from accidental drops, and a raised bezel protects the screen. There's also a built-in kickstand for use when viewing TV shows or movies.

The Kiddy Lock Case will be available during the first quarter of 2017 for $39.99, and it will come in Black, Cyan, Purple, Magenta, and Pink. Customers considering the Kiddy Lock Case should be aware that Apple offers Guided Access, a built-in tool for preventing access to the Home button and other iPhone features. Guided Access is a free accessibility feature that can be turned on in the Settings app.

Alongside the Kiddy Lock Case, Incipio is also introducing the Incipio ONE Dynamic Case Ecosystem for the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus. The Incipio One features a range of interchangeable back plates that can be used with a base iPhone 7 case.


Back plates include a leather Card Holder able to store two credit cards and an ID, a 3,000 mAh battery bank, a Qi Wireless Charging module, a Style Plate in several finishes and colors, and a leather Style Plate Premium.

The ONE ecosystem will be available during the first quarter of 2017. The base case will be priced at $39.99 and the accessory plates will be available at prices ranging from $19.99 to $39.99.

Article Link: CES 2017: Incipio's 'Kiddy Lock' Case for iPhone 7 Keeps Kids From Accessing Home Button


If a movie is playing and kid triple clicks home button the movie stops and opens passcode screen. What do you think is easier, physically blocking home button or going thru the steps to activate guided access and hope kid doesn't triple click?
 
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Jenjo

macrumors newbie
Jan 5, 2017
5
0
It w
There you said it. Smart. They'll figure out the mechanism quicker than you and me.
It was designed FOR SMART small children. I've seen it, it's not as easy as you think for the little hands to maneuver and figure out.
[doublepost=1483644245][/doublepost]
It's too bad more parents don't know about guided access. It works really well and you can simply disable whatever hardware buttons and gestures you want, as well as draw over areas of the display that you don't want them to press. This is really useful for games where you don't want them to accidentally quit and get stuck in a menu. I don't let my kids use my iPhone, but I let my daughter, who is old enough now, play some educational games on the iPad for about 20 minutes every other day or so. With guided access, this case isn't worth it, and beyond that I'm sure they'll find a way in with a case vs. guided access, which uses a passcode.


If a movie is playing and kid triple clocks home button the movie stops and opens passcode screen. What do you think is easier, physically blocking home button or going thru the steps to activate guided access and hope kid doesn't triple click?
 
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Jenjo

macrumors newbie
Jan 5, 2017
5
0
Using "Guided Access" is free. I do this when showing anyone anything on my phone lol.[/QUOTE

If a movie is playing and kid triple clicks home button the movie stops and opens passcode screen. What do you think is easier, physically blocking home button or going thru the steps to activate guided access and hope kid doesn't triple click? Just a thought ;)
 
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iMerik

macrumors 6502a
May 3, 2011
603
444
Upper Midwest
Jenjo, if you're kid is triple-clicking the home button, you tell them to stop it. That's an obscure enough issue that I don't think many parents are too worried about that happening or having to talk with their child about it if it does. Since you are brand new and just posted your response three times (and seem to have trouble with quoted posts), I'm going to assume you are shilling for Incipio and ignore your comments here on out.
 
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Jenjo

macrumors newbie
Jan 5, 2017
5
0
Jenjo, if you're kid is triple-clicking the home button, you tell them to stop it. That's an obscure enough issue that I don't think many parents are too worried about that happening or having to talk with their child about it if it does. Since you are brand new and just posted your response three times (and seem to have trouble with quoted posts), I'm going to assume you are shilling for Incipio and ignore your comments here on out.
I just don't like hearing people be not supportive....of anything really, unless they have experienced it first.
That's all. Have a nice day!
 
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