Chamberlain Debuts Updated MyQ Smart Garage Hub With Better Connectivity

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Apr 12, 2001
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Chamberlain today announced the launch of a new version of the MyQ Smart Garage Hub, which is designed to allow smartphone users to control their garage doors from anywhere using the accompanying MyQ app.

The MyQ Smart Garage Hub, which connects to a home Wi-Fi network, is compatible with most brands of garage door openers manufactured after 1994. The new MyQ Smart Garage Hub supports improved communication between the hub and the garage door sensor, enhanced sensor battery monitoring, and automatic identification of available Wi-Fi signals to make installation quicker and easier.

"The MyQ Smart Garage Hub was developed in response to customers' requests for improved Wi-Fi connection reliability and enhanced communication between the door sensor and the hub. And, it further develops our line of secure and reliable connected products," said John Villanueva, Vice President and General Manager of Residential Access Solutions at Chamberlain Group.
When paired with the MyQ Home Bridge, the MyQ Smart Garage Hub also works to enable HomeKit compatibility so the garage door can be controlled via Siri commands. The MyQ Home Bridge, released in August, pairs with the new MyQ Smart Garage Hub, the existing MyQ Garage, or a MyQ-enabled garage door opener.

The MyQ Smart Garage Hub is priced at $99.99 from the Chamberlain website, and for a limited time, Chamberlain is offering a $20 discount on a $150 bundle that includes both the MyQ Smart Garage Hub and the MyQ Home Bridge with the promo code SGHHBPCK20.

Article Link: Chamberlain Debuts Updated MyQ Smart Garage Hub With Better Connectivity
 

pdxgold

macrumors newbie
Dec 29, 2016
3
0
I have the last version that's HomeKit compatible. It was a major pain to set up, because I didn't realize that my WiFi's 5GHz channel must be turned off during the set up process. But it is very cool to tell Siri to open and close my garage door.
 

joshuawhite929

macrumors newbie
Oct 2, 2017
5
3
So, whats the difference between the Smart Garage Hub and just the MyQ Garage previously reviewed here: https://www.macrumors.com/review/chamberlain-myq-garage-home-bridge/ Is this just an updated version of the MyQ Garage? Both require the Home Bridge to integrate with Homekit

To make things less clear... the description here: https://www.chamberlain.com/ces seems to indicate that homekit compatibility is included.

UPDATE: The garage door sensors have been updated to. Unfortunately, the new sensors are not yet for sale individually yet. If you have more than one garage door, you'll have to wait to add them.
 
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now i see it

macrumors 601
Jan 2, 2002
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Man... Nowadays if you got held up at gun point and were forced to unlock your phone ---- pretty much the theif would have the keys to your kingdom.
 

Nunyabinez

macrumors 68000
Apr 27, 2010
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Provo, UT
Confirmed that you can get a $50 discount, but had $13 shipping. Both units for 112.98. Looking forward to hooking this up. Maybe I should have tried SGHHBPCK100.

We just put an ecobee4 in the house and we're loving it.
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Man... Nowadays if you got held up at gun point and were forced to unlock your phone ---- pretty much the theif would have the keys to your kingdom.
Yes before this they would have only had your actual keys so they couldn't do anything... oh wait :D
 

jclo

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Dec 7, 2012
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So, whats the difference between the Smart Garage Hub and just the MyQ Garage previously reviewed here: https://www.macrumors.com/review/chamberlain-myq-garage-home-bridge/ Is this just an updated version of the MyQ Garage? Both require the Home Bridge to integrate with Homekit

To make things less clear... the description here: https://www.chamberlain.com/ces seems to indicate that homekit compatibility is included.
From what I understand, Chamberlain originally planned to add HomeKit compatibility to the MyQ Smart Garage but ultimately changed its plans. MyQ Smart Garage Hub does not have HomeKit and requires the bridge like the MyQ Garage.
 

joshuawhite929

macrumors newbie
Oct 2, 2017
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dwhittington

macrumors regular
Mar 20, 2007
179
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Houston, TX
This is great that they are improving their product. Wish they would improve the app now to make it more automobile usage friendly.
 

Kabeyun

macrumors 68020
Mar 27, 2004
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I will never connect a door lock or door opener to the internet unless the answer is true to the following question:
Would I bet my life and those of my family that these devices can’t be hacked?

can ≠ should
 

cere

macrumors 6502
Jun 3, 2008
465
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I will never connect a door lock or door opener to the internet unless the answer is true to the following question:
Would I bet my life and those of my family that these devices can’t be hacked?

can ≠ should
If someone really wants to threaten my life and those of my family they could use a fairly low tech solution to circumvent the security on my home: a rock through the window successfully hacks the security of most home windows. Also a hammer or sturdy piece of wood.

Most GDOs operate by RF anyway which is certainly as susceptible to attack. Do you manually open and close your door garage door?
 
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brianrmurray

macrumors member
Apr 7, 2014
38
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Dallas, TX
If someone wants to threaten my life and those of my family they could use a fairly low tech solution to circumvent the security on my home: a rock through the window successfully hacks the security of most home windows. Also a hammer or sturdy piece of wood.

Most GDOs operate by RF anyway which is certainly as susceptible to attack. Do you manually open and close your door garage door?
Exactly.
 

munpip214

macrumors regular
Feb 21, 2011
129
193
Should be noted that $100 is just about half the cost of an entire garage door opener with WiFi built in
True but as soon as you add a second door to the equation it makes a bigger difference. Only $40 or so for an extra sensor.
 

vipergts2207

macrumors 68020
Apr 7, 2009
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Columbus, OH
For the win... how is this product different from the MyQ Garage: https://www.chamberlain.com/smartphone-control-products/myq-garage/model-myq-g0201 Is this simply a new version?
According to Chamberlain:

"Advanced MyQ Smart Garage Hub features include improved communication between the hub and garage door sensor, enhanced sensor battery monitoring, and automatic identification of available Wi-Fi signals for easier installation and setup."

In other words I wouldn't go out and replace a MyQ Garage, but if you have yet to buy one this new one is the one to get.
 

Kabeyun

macrumors 68020
Mar 27, 2004
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If someone really wants to threaten my life and those of my family they could use a fairly low tech solution to circumvent the security on my home: a rock through the window successfully hacks the security of most home windows. Also a hammer or sturdy piece of wood.
This is a common post. Thing is, at that instant my security system’s alarm starts to shriek and the police automatically get called. Before that instant my motion detectors probably picked up the intruder, and, depending on my settings, turned on the exterior lights at a minimum. Can’t say the same thing about someone hacking my house from a van down the road.
Most GDOs operate by RF anyway which is certainly as susceptible to attack. Do you manually open and close your door garage door?
You have 20+ year old information, although sadly some people with legacy equipment don’t realize this. After the mid-90s, GDOs, including my LiftMasters, were made using rolling codes, and the now-meme kid’s toy trick won’t work. The odds of the next RF impulse being the same as the last are less than 1:1,000,000. And a door with an actual “dumb” deadbolt lock stands between my garage and my home’s interior (see above), and can’t be opened by electronically-transmitted zeros and ones.

Again, I will never use these things. I can’t think of a single convenience they offer that’s either unavailable to me currently by safer means, or so vastly better as to be worth it. Light switches and televisions are one thing. Home access is quite another.
 
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steve123

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Aug 26, 2007
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This is a common post. Thing is, at that instant my security system’s alarm starts to shriek and the police automatically get called. Before that instant my motion detectors probably picked up the intruder, and, depending on my settings, turned on the exterior lights at a minimum. Can’t say the same thing about someone hacking my house from a van down the road.

You have 20+ year old information, although sadly some people with legacy equipment don’t realize this. After the mid-90s, GDOs, including my LiftMasters, were made using rolling codes, and the now-meme kid’s toy trick won’t work. The odds of the next RF impulse being the same as the last are less than 1:1,000,000. And a door with an actual “dumb” deadbolt lock stands between my garage and my home’s interior (see above), and can’t be opened by electronically-transmitted zeros and ones.

Again, I will never use these things. I can’t think of a single convenience they offer that’s either unavailable to me currently by safer means, or so vastly better as to be worth it. Light switches and televisions are one thing. Home access is quite another.
A script kiddie can hack those rolling codes in about a millisecond with $20 SDR radio. Once the dude is inside the garage, close the door and your deadbolt will not matter, just punch a hole in the drywall and in he goes ...
 

mrwuf

macrumors newbie
Sep 14, 2016
23
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Raleigh, NC
This is a common post. Thing is, at that instant my security system’s alarm starts to shriek and the police automatically get called. Before that instant my motion detectors probably picked up the intruder, and, depending on my settings, turned on the exterior lights at a minimum. Can’t say the same thing about someone hacking my house from a van down the road.

You have 20+ year old information, although sadly some people with legacy equipment don’t realize this. After the mid-90s, GDOs, including my LiftMasters, were made using rolling codes, and the now-meme kid’s toy trick won’t work. The odds of the next RF impulse being the same as the last are less than 1:1,000,000. And a door with an actual “dumb” deadbolt lock stands between my garage and my home’s interior (see above), and can’t be opened by electronically-transmitted zeros and ones.

Again, I will never use these things. I can’t think of a single convenience they offer that’s either unavailable to me currently by safer means, or so vastly better as to be worth it. Light switches and televisions are one thing. Home access is quite another.
Pretty easy to defeat a deadbolt or kill a security system for that matter. If someone wants in, they can get in. I have a lot more faith in enterprise encryption than dumb locks that can be defeated by any handyman or locksmith. If they get in, they have to get past my loaded 12 ga.

As for a single convenience, don’t you ever forget whether you closed your garage? It happens to one of us at least once/week. I’m hoping one of these let’s me know the status and close it remotely.
 

gsmornot

macrumors 68040
Sep 29, 2014
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So if I have two garage doors what do I need for parts? I want to add this to my Homekit setup.
 

Kabeyun

macrumors 68020
Mar 27, 2004
2,246
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Eastern USA
A script kiddie can hack those rolling codes in about a millisecond with $20 SDR radio.
Source?
Once the dude is inside the garage, close the door and your deadbolt will not matter, just punch a hole in the drywall and in he goes ...
Brick is between my garage and my interior. And even if it were drywall, my interior motion detectors end his fun.
Pretty easy to defeat a deadbolt or kill a security system for that matter. If someone wants in, they can get in. I have a lot more faith in enterprise encryption than dumb locks that can be defeated by any handyman or locksmith. If they get in, they have to get past my loaded 12 ga.
Actually, pretty hard neutralize a remote-monitored security system with parallel redundancy and auto-telephony. And again, see above. Interior motions will cry havoc and save the intruders life (see your above, although mine’s a 20-ga [bad shoulder]).
As for a single convenience, don’t you ever forget whether you closed your garage? It happens to one of us at least once/week. I’m hoping one of these let’s me know the status and close it remotely.
Nah. Very occasionally the door “bounces” open before it fully closes (sensitive safety switch), so I watch it close every time before I drive off.
 

vipergts2207

macrumors 68020
Apr 7, 2009
2,068
2,442
Columbus, OH
This is a common post. Thing is, at that instant my security system’s alarm starts to shriek and the police automatically get called. Before that instant my motion detectors probably picked up the intruder, and, depending on my settings, turned on the exterior lights at a minimum. Can’t say the same thing about someone hacking my house from a van down the road.

You have 20+ year old information, although sadly some people with legacy equipment don’t realize this. After the mid-90s, GDOs, including my LiftMasters, were made using rolling codes, and the now-meme kid’s toy trick won’t work. The odds of the next RF impulse being the same as the last are less than 1:1,000,000. And a door with an actual “dumb” deadbolt lock stands between my garage and my home’s interior (see above), and can’t be opened by electronically-transmitted zeros and ones.

Again, I will never use these things. I can’t think of a single convenience they offer that’s either unavailable to me currently by safer means, or so vastly better as to be worth it. Light switches and televisions are one thing. Home access is quite another.
That’s a near Trumpian level of paranoia. There’s primarily two reasons for someone to break into your house.

1. Someone specifically targeting you because they want to do you harm, in which case your security system isn’t going to stop them. If they’re serious, a weapon is pretty much you’re only hope there. Police response time is too slow to save you.

2. Someone looking to steal stuff to sell for money. In this case there are far softer targets than a person’s smart home. Not to mention most burglars aren’t exactly known to be that sophisticated and if they are, they’ve probably got a better target than your house. If they’ve got the capability to hack a smart home, they’re probably also savvy enough to use their technical skills to make better money in far less risky ways. Ways that don’t involve them possibly being shot.

And in both cases they’d have to know about the presence of smart devices to take advantage of in the first place. This is simply a fear not grounded in practical reality.

Edited to add, further, this assumes that any potential vulnerabilities out there remain unpatched or unfixable after they’re discovered. Honestly, the chances on the scenarios happening that you’ve cooked up in your head likely exceed the figure of 1 in 1,000,000 you gave for the RF pulses matching.
 
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IJ Reilly

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Jul 16, 2002
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Palookaville
Thank you for this product. I’ve always wanted to be able to open and close my garage doors when I am not at home. It would totally freak out the neighbors.