iPad Pro Charge out of the box

sacha_g88

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Aug 2, 2017
29
10
Hi everyone,

Sorry for a perhaps tedious question. i got an ipad pro 10.5 64gb the other day and it had a 86% charge out of the box. I then swapped it a couple days later for the 256gb and it only had a 73% charge out of the box. Is this normal, why could there be such a variance between 2 very recently released devices purchased from the same store within a couple days? i know a tedious question, just curious and want to make sure i didn't get a repackaged return or that there is something wrong with the battery.
 

Gav2k

macrumors G3
Jul 24, 2009
9,216
1,606
Charge level on new devices always varies. It’s nothing you should get hung up on tbh
 
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Relentless Power

macrumors Nehalem
Jul 12, 2016
34,327
35,406
Hi everyone,

Sorry for a perhaps tedious question. i got an ipad pro 10.5 64gb the other day and it had a 86% charge out of the box. I then swapped it a couple days later for the 256gb and it only had a 73% charge out of the box. Is this normal, why could there be such a variance between 2 very recently released devices purchased from the same store within a couple days? i know a tedious question, just curious and want to make sure i didn't get a repackaged return or that there is something wrong with the battery.
Lithium ion batteries will naturally deplete over time if not charged regularly. There is nothing abnormal about your iPad battery life when purchased. The same applies to the iPhone and Apple Watch, which also uses lithium ion batteries.

https://www.apple.com/batteries/why-lithium-ion/
 

Newtons Apple

Suspended
Mar 12, 2014
22,757
15,227
Jacksonville, Florida
Hi everyone,

Sorry for a perhaps tedious question. i got an ipad pro 10.5 64gb the other day and it had a 86% charge out of the box. I then swapped it a couple days later for the 256gb and it only had a 73% charge out of the box. Is this normal, why could there be such a variance between 2 very recently released devices purchased from the same store within a couple days? i know a tedious question, just curious and want to make sure i didn't get a repackaged return or that there is something wrong with the battery.
You need to relax. Th charge state of your battery, out of the box, can vary. Nothing to worry about.
 
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sacha_g88

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Aug 2, 2017
29
10
You need to relax. Th charge state of your battery, out of the box, can vary. Nothing to worry about.
I appreciate your feedback. Part of the reason was that I ran the Battery Life app after the first hour of use, and it was indicating that the battery has 3% of wear on it. I'm not sure if this accurate, but it does concern me a bit. Any thoughts on that?
 
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Ev0d3vil

macrumors 6502
Sep 22, 2014
339
33
I appreciate your feedback. Part of the reason was that I ran the Battery Life app after the first hour of use, and it was indicating that the battery has 3% of wear on it. I'm not sure if this accurate, but it does concern me a bit. Any thoughts on that?
Just use the device. When it's worn out, replace. TBH, iPads last pretty Long so you should be fine.
 

Newtons Apple

Suspended
Mar 12, 2014
22,757
15,227
Jacksonville, Florida
I appreciate your feedback. Part of the reason was that I ran the Battery Life app after the first hour of use, and it was indicating that the battery has 3% of wear on it. I'm not sure if this accurate, but it does concern me a bit. Any thoughts on that?
Some of the battery apps are know to be inaccurate. Aways test when the battery is fully charged.

Try to just enjoy your device. Apple put a lot of technology in these devices so that you can just use them. Charge while sleeping and do not worry about it.
 

akash.nu

macrumors G3
May 26, 2016
9,042
10,681
I appreciate your feedback. Part of the reason was that I ran the Battery Life app after the first hour of use, and it was indicating that the battery has 3% of wear on it. I'm not sure if this accurate, but it does concern me a bit. Any thoughts on that?
None of the battery apps on the AppStore shows correct readings anymore since apple has deprecated the system status API.
 

Chupa Chupa

macrumors G5
Jul 16, 2002
14,834
7,394
People need to stop being so OCD. Battery life out of the box is going to depend on the time differential between when the product was charged at the factory and when it was first opened. It really matters not what the battery % is when you open the box. 100% irrelevant.

Bottom line is the battery is covered by warranty. If it degrades faster than it should based on charging cycles Apple will replace it so no worries. The odds of having a bad battery are something like 2% of all iPad shipped. The reality is most people will replace their iPad because it's just too "old" rather than battery issues.

Apple's recommendations for keeping a battery healthy as long as possible: https://www.apple.com/batteries/maximizing-performance/
 

M5RahuL

macrumors 68030
Aug 1, 2009
2,740
1,088
Colorado
I wouldn't worry a bit about the battery life on an iPad. Having owned pretty much all releases, iPads have had the best battery life of most of the devices! Heck, my Air 2 (after 3+ yrs) still lasts almost as great as my new Pro 10.5!

The *out of the box* battery %age might depend on how long it's been sitting in packaging since it's inception at the factory. That's all. My Air 2 had less than 50% when I bought it..

Just enjoy the damn thing!
 

960design

macrumors 68040
Apr 17, 2012
3,086
1,009
Destin, FL
Hi everyone,

Sorry for a perhaps tedious question. i got an ipad pro 10.5 64gb the other day and it had a 86% charge out of the box. I then swapped it a couple days later for the 256gb and it only had a 73% charge out of the box. Is this normal, why could there be such a variance between 2 very recently released devices purchased from the same store within a couple days? i know a tedious question, just curious and want to make sure i didn't get a repackaged return or that there is something wrong with the battery.
Your iPad is normal.
I have opened ( provisioned ) over 1000 iPads in the last two weeks. The initial battery charge varies from 89% to 55%.
 

Sunshoopa

macrumors 6502
Apr 19, 2011
312
198
I’m sure you know this already (and maybe not even your concern), but they won’t ever be 90~100% due to not being good on the battery for long time storage. It’s best to keep them below 90 but above 50.
 
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dsc888

macrumors 6502
Jun 25, 2010
383
150
Boston, MA USA
I bought my new 2017 IPP 12.9 yesterday from Bestbuy and it was manufactured during the 27 week of 2017 or the first week of July. It had 98% charge! I was very surprised. Most of my other iPads came with greater than 90% and were made within a month or 2 of my purchase.
 
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Centris 650

macrumors 6502a
Dec 26, 2002
575
307
Near Charleston, SC
Yeah it's no big deal but it can be humorous. I just bought my two high school kids a 9.7 (2017) iPad. My daughter's, a silver iPad, was at 70% but my son's space grey was at 2%. He was dying to get on it and set it up but had to leave it plugged up and charge.

It's nothing major or anything to worry about but it IS frustrating when you want to play around with your new device but the battery is about dead.
 

akash.nu

macrumors G3
May 26, 2016
9,042
10,681
What about the W3.org Battery Status API? I was considering writing a little app to test any device with a modern browser:
https://www.w3.org/TR/battery-status/
If the manufacturer of the device is not providing the system status from the OS then any such implementation is pointless I believe. The whole concept of that w3 page is to find out the time difference between charging and discharging which can be dependent on so many things. I don't understand how that implementation can provide any info that's actually good enough to be used.
 

960design

macrumors 68040
Apr 17, 2012
3,086
1,009
Destin, FL
If the manufacturer of the device is not providing the system status from the OS then any such implementation is pointless I believe. The whole concept of that w3 page is to find out the time difference between charging and discharging which can be dependent on so many things. I don't understand how that implementation can provide any info that's actually good enough to be used.
Right... that would be the test. Start fully charged, run a looping series of 3D animations, text writing, page scrolling, writing to / reading from harddrive and have a video running using simple html5.

These tests would be the 'standard' to compare different devices. The results would be stored in local storage.

Seems simple enough. I mean, it is just a battery test after all.

I've tested Dell laptops ( pre release ) that don't even hit 50% of the their claimed battery life. The reps, reply was that they were quoting the extended battery and send this 5lb block of something that looks like a Mag Flashlight to plug in and then we just barely get to their claims.

The software I use, does not work on iOS, Nooks, ect. I thought of writing something that would be a little more robust.

Sorry OP:
I have had a few devices arrive dead. They are typically the one out of 100 pulled and double checked by a supervisor to ensure quality. Sometimes the supervisor forgets to turn the device off and pushes it onto packaging. So, every once in awhile I will get one with a low or dead battery. If I had to guess, less than 1 in 300.
 

spiderman0616

macrumors 68040
Aug 1, 2010
3,762
4,150
I’ve never charged whilst sleeping.

I don’t believe in leaving any unused device using power when not in use.

Maybe I’m old school preserve energy etc
You realize the charger doesn't continuously draw power once the unit is charged, right? So if you leave an iPad or iPhone or whatever device charging over night, it will draw power up until the battery is fully charged, and then will only sip power when needed after that. If it was just continually sending charge to the iPad, the thing would explode.
 
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