Charging with 12W Brick

Discussion in 'Apple Watch' started by Bbqthis, Apr 21, 2015.

  1. Bbqthis macrumors 6502a

    Bbqthis

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    #1
    I know there was a thread about this a few weeks ago, but no consensus was drawn. Will the Watch charger faster with an iPad brick? Is there anymore info about this? Have any reviewers talked about this? If not we should all just tweet John Gruber or someone and see...
     
  2. LiemTa macrumors regular

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    Jun 2, 2014
    #2
    Best bet is to ask someone with an Apple Watch to do a test.
     
  3. Bbqthis thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Bbqthis

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    #3
    Yeah that's why the last bit of my original post talked about tweeting John Gruber. If we got a large enough group to do it....
     
  4. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

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    #4
    It won't charge any quicker than the circuitry will allow and given the size of the battery a 5w charger is going to offer the same charge time as the 10/12w chargers
     
  5. rkuo macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    The answer is virtually certain to be no. The battery is miniscule and charging at 2A would undoubtedly shorten the battery life.
     
  6. DavidWildJnr macrumors regular

    DavidWildJnr

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    #6
    2A is the maximum a device can draw not the current that will be supplied. I am 99% sure that a high amp charger will not affect the battery life.
     
  7. jhinchl macrumors newbie

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    #7
    The 12w usb brick is listed as an Apple Watch Accessory.
     
  8. rkuo macrumors 6502a

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    #8
    The question was would it charge faster, not would it affect the battery life.
     
  9. DavidWildJnr macrumors regular

    DavidWildJnr

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    #9
    I am aware of that, I am convinced it would, but I was responding to the 'Undoubtedly shorten battery life' in the post I quoted.
     
  10. LiemTa macrumors regular

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    #10
    I know. I can ****ing read.
     
  11. madsci954, Apr 22, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2015

    madsci954 macrumors 68030

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    #11
    Incorrect. Given how small it is, that high of current can reduce its life. Source: my 7.5 years experience working R&D in the battery industry. Apple puts in safeguards to prevent excess charging, so one can use a 12W charger without fear.

    Also, someone posted, I recall they sourced one of the tech reviews, that it will not charge faster.
     
  12. jwball macrumors regular

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  13. dotnet macrumors 6502a

    dotnet

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    #13
    Both the 5W and the 12W charger provide 5V, the charging circuitry inside the watch (or MagSafe puck) alone is what determines the current drawn. The chargers only differ in the amount of current they are able to deliver.

    Oh my.
     
  14. Mascots macrumors 65816

    Mascots

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    #14
    That's essentially rephrasing what he said but with details I think most people could interpret. :confused:
     
  15. Brian Y macrumors 68040

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    Oct 21, 2012
    #15
    And what I believe he's saying, that if the watch charged at 2a (i.e. if it *chose* to draw 2a) it would shorten the battery's life.

    There is a difference between connecting to a 2a charger (and charging at 1a), and charging at 2a (which is what he said). He did not say that connecting it to a 2a charger may damage it. He said that charging at 2a may damage it.
     
  16. dotnet, Apr 22, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2015

    dotnet macrumors 6502a

    dotnet

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    #16
    Sure, but we don't get to choose how much current goes into the battery. The charge logic in the device (any device that has a built-in Li-ion or similar battery) controls and monitors the charge process, this is the only way the batteries can be charged safely, efficiently and with predictable results.

    Our job is simply to provide a source of electrical energy in the correct voltage range for the charge logic to operate, and with sufficient ability to deliver the current required for charging the battery.

    If the power adapter we use is beefier than required then either of two things can happen:
    1. the charging circuitry can make use of the extra power and charge the battery faster (but still withing safe specs)
    2. the charging logic will draw the same current as with the standard charger, and we've wasted our money

    If the power adapter is underspec'ed (e.g. a computer USB port) then either of these two things can happen:
    1. the power adapter can get damaged (unlikely, because they are usually designed to protect themselves from excess current draw)
    2. the charge logic recognises the reduced ability of the power adapter (either through communication with it or by monitoring the supplied voltage, which will drop), in this case charging of the battery will simply take longer.

    There is no danger of damaging or harming the battery in devices like the watch or the iPhone, as long as one provides the correct voltage (5V in this case).
     
  17. Mascots macrumors 65816

    Mascots

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    #17
    That's a long explanation just to be right and have the last word.

    That is exactly what was implied.
     
  18. dotnet macrumors 6502a

    dotnet

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    #18
    Who are you, the narrator?
     
  19. Brian Y macrumors 68040

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    Oct 21, 2012
    #19
    That's exactly what was said?

    The argument isn't whether plugging something into a higher powered adapter will damage the device. It's whether if Apple had allowed the watch to pull 2A (and therefore charge at 2A) the lifespan of the battery, given how small it is, would be reduced.
     
  20. Bbqthis thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Bbqthis

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    #20
    OP here. Anyway, I asked John Gruber and he said he hadn't tried it but he's pretty sure it doesn't charge faster with the 12 W brick.
     
  21. Nicklaus macrumors 6502

    Nicklaus

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    #21
    Isn't it wireless magnetic inductive like a toothbrush or chi charger?
     
  22. Bbqthis thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Bbqthis

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    #22
    Yes, but it plugs into a normal iPhone or iPad charging brick.
     
  23. saksvig macrumors member

    saksvig

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    Sep 19, 2014
    #23
    Well Apple is selling both the chargers in their accessories section for Apple watch. I'm pretty sure it won't impact your battery life and give you a quicker charge option like in case of iPhones
     

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  24. Bbqthis thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Bbqthis

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    #24
    Pretty sure you can charge with either brick but the charge time will be the same.
     
  25. evercleardoc macrumors newbie

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    Sep 16, 2014
    #25
    Just a suggestion but see what the current draw would be on a MBP (like what an iphone 6/6+ does). Does it draw out the 500 + 1600 or only 500 or only 500 + 500 under the system info.
     

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