Classic Macbook Pro Lives On

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by DFZD, Mar 9, 2015.

  1. DFZD macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2012
    #1
    Did anyone notice that they have updated the page for the Classic Macbook with a Yosemite screen?

    https://www.apple.com/macbook-pro/specs/

    Why don't they just discontinue this POS. Are people out there still buying it? It has a 3 year old config.
     
  2. AustinIllini macrumors demi-god

    AustinIllini

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    Austin, USA
    #2

    People still buy it. Simple as that.
     
  3. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #3
    Well it runs Yosemite and even a 2011 takes everything I can throw at it today now it has more ram and an SSD for the OS - and as you can order the cMBP with factory SSD that makes it pretty relevant so who cares if it is 3yr old tech, for most people that actually makes zero difference. Oh and plenty of ports, no UI lag due to the 4x load from a retina screen.
     
  4. Hildegerd macrumors regular

    Hildegerd

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    #4
    I love the classic, too bad the 15" isn't still here too.
     
  5. deepen03 macrumors member

    deepen03

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    Jan 17, 2010
    #5
    Are you seriously defending this piece of garbage? $200 gets you a 2015 MB Retina with Broadwell. It makes the MD101 even less appealing. The CD/DVD format is dying like the cassette tapes! You get 5 year old hardware with a 3rd gen Intel from 2011 for $1100. I can name 10 Mac-quality Windows Ultrabrooks that are a far better option. And Windows 8.1 isn't horrible, if that is your next argument.

    ----------

    I couldn't agree more
     
  6. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    Jan 3, 2014
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    Auckland
    #6
    Rant all you want, it obviously meets a lot of people's needs which are clearly different to yours. No problem with that at all.

    For most users there won't be any appreciable difference to their computing experience whether they buy one of these new, now, or buy a latest MBA - this is true of most consumer devices though.

    Couldn't care about Windows x.y, don't use it, have no need.

    You have a strange definition of "garbage", are you having a cMBP forced on you in your life??
     
  7. jeremac macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2011
    #7
    Yes, people like me are still buying it. I just got one last week. It's not a "POS" either when using my student discount I can get a 13" MacBook Pro with 8 GB memory and a better processor than the retina model for less than the original price of the retina. I don't need a retina screen, I'm not blind. With the retina coming with 128 GB HD space it's pretty ridiculous, no matter if flash is "faster." I don't need to pay extra for an external hard drive or an external SuperDrive. Some people still use CDs and DVDs, as well as FireWire which the classic MacBook Pro has. It's not a POS when you have to pay more just to have less included with an HD screen. Enjoy your 128 GB, sucker.
     
  8. Hieveryone macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2014
    #8
    It's a nice computer. I read one guy on here says he uses it because he still needs ethernet port and CD drive.

    So if you write CDs a lot and don't have wifi, this is perfect. Just throw in a 256 GB SSSD and 8 GB RAM and it's pretty much as good as anything else minus no retina screen.
     
  9. MarcBook macrumors 6502a

    MarcBook

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    #9
    What surprises me more is that Apple still has the parts for theses! It's still the Mid 2012 model.

    OK, so the HDDs switched to HGST and the RAM changed to Hynix, but they're otherwise the same machines as the ones that rolled out almost three years ago. :eek:

    Does Intel still make this particular 2.5GHz Core i5 for specially for Apple, or did Apple just buy a massive number of these things?
     
  10. smartalic34 macrumors 6502a

    smartalic34

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    USA
    #10
    It is, however, user-upgradable, so a customer can buy the machine and then throw in 8 or even 16GB of RAM for a fraction of what Apple charges, plus an SSD. All of a sudden, you have a screamer of a machine. Most users aren't going to notice the CPU difference (with web-browsing/streaming, word processing, photos). Only gamers will notice the GPU difference, and this MBP is not targeted at gamers. Considering that 2007 MBPs can run Yosemite, a MBP with a 2011/2012 CPU could potentially see OS upgrades through 2020 at least.

    Still a great deal, it's future-proof, and I'm not surprised Apple hasn't discontinued it.
     
  11. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #11
    Who really cares, apart from those that want to buy or upgrade a three year old spec Notebook. For the $$$$ you can get a lot more. Those thinking this device is future proof are dreaming, it`s history plain & simple, and pricing a joke...

    Q-6
     
  12. RUGGLES99 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2015
    #12
    For $829 you can get a refurb mid 2012 classic mbp from apple. 1 year warranty, applecare option. Its a steal, just bought one..
     
  13. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #13
    Fascinating, welcome to the past...

    Q-6
     
  14. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

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    May 3, 2014
    Location:
    Kentucky
    #14
    I bought my (late 2011) model before the Retina models were even announced, but it's showing no signs of slowing down.

    I upgraded the RAM to 8gb myself, and will probably throw an SSD in it one of these days. I fully expect to get a LOT more life out of this computer. If something happened and I had to replaced, I'd probably get a 2012 model.

    I use the ports on mine-including Ethernet and Firewire-often enough that I'm happy to not have to carry around extra dongles to make use of them. They're not every day requirements for me, but again used frequently enough that I appreciate them.

    I also use the optical drive on a very regular basis-again, not daily, but several times a week.

    The computer works for me. If someone handed me a blank check today to go out and buy a new computer, I'd probably go out and buy a mid-2012 as a replacement(actually I'd probably hunt down a 15" with a matte high-res screen, but that's another discussion).

    BTW, I teach a freshman level chemistry class and have a fresh crop of about 300 students every semester. If what I see when I look out over the classroom is any indication, Apple is still selling a LOT of these things. I'd venture to guess that about half or a little more than half of the folks in my class I see with Apple laptops have the 13" Classic. The other half is probably 2/3 Airs(usually 13", with the occasional 11"), and the remainder 13" Retinas. There's also the occasional 15"-either Classic or Retina-thrown in. If what I see is any indication, Apple is still selling boatloads of these things.
     
  15. smartalic34 macrumors 6502a

    smartalic34

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    USA
    #15
    Adding 8GB/16GB RAM and an SSD is, in fact, future-proofing. Those with 2015 MacBook Airs or Retina Pros are stuck with whatever RAM (4GB still standard on many configurations, both on '15 Airs and '13 Pros) came with the machine, and SSD upgrades aren't easy. One of these classic MBP machines can go to 16GB of RAM, and whatever new SSD is available. CPU and GPU aren't the choke point in performance, and haven't been for a long time, unless you're gaming or doing pro-level work. Should the cMBP be $100 cheaper? Sure. Is it a bad deal? Far from it.

    One more thing: the CPU in the cMBP being offered is more powerful than that in the new 2015 MacBook Air, at least by Geekbench performance. It may be from 2012, but it's just as powerful as some of the new machines Apple is selling.
     
  16. capathy21 macrumors 65816

    capathy21

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    Houston, Texas
    #16
    Been to an Apple store lately? People still flock to the cMBP. I know two people in the last 6 months that chose the cMBP. There are two types of consumers who purchase the cMBP. Those who actually need the extra functionality of ports and drives, and the casual user who thinks they do.

    What you seem to forget is, those of us on these type of forums are the one's that follow new technology and are usually early adapters. Many casual consumers still think all laptops come with disc drives and a place to plug the internet cable in. It freaks them out when they see something like the Air with no disc drive or firewire, etc. It doesn't matter that they haven't put a disc into their laptop in 2 years, they think they need it. When they see that it is cheaper than the retina model AND it has more ports, it is a better value in their mind.
     
  17. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #17
    All MBPr`s are all either 8 or 16, with 13" MBPr & the Air`s now on 5th Gen CPU`s & iGPU`s with further extended battery life and faster SSD`s. You can get a similar windows based Notebook for less than half the price of the 13" classic, and for good reason.

    Even the lowest spec Air will dominate the 13" classic out the box, yes you can upgrade, and yes you have to pay for that in both cases. Nor will the classic ever approach the performance and user experience of the current MacBook Pro Retina`s.

    Want to buy one, fine, equally proclaiming their brilliance is what it is. The newer Macs are simply, faster, quieter, have significantly better graphics, run longer on battery, lighter, greater portability and so it goes on...

    Q-6
     
  18. smartalic34 macrumors 6502a

    smartalic34

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    USA
    #18
    You're barking up the wrong tree. I never said that the cMBP was a better machine. It is, however, good enough for 90% of users. Most consumers are not going to push any modern laptop to its limits. The lowest spec Air will not dominate the cMBP 13" out of the box... for what most people will use it for. Web browsing, word processing, music, photos. Most people don't do more than that. MacRumors is not representative of the population as a whole, and most people are not pushing their machines to the max. iTunes is going to load the next song just as fast on a cMBP as a new Air, a photo edited just as quickly. Most people aren't needing 10 hours of battery life. Most people aren't going to care whether their laptop is 3 pounds or 5 pounds.

    Again, I agree - the new machines are better, and I never said they weren't (except the cMBP has a better processor than all Airs). The point is, it doesn't matter for most consumers, which is why Apple is still selling it (though $899 would probably be a more appropriate price point).
     
  19. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #19
    Lots of people forget that lots of other people buy what is good enough in the brand they want, not everyone buys the top/maxxed out spec.
     
  20. MarvinHC macrumors 6502a

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    Jan 9, 2014
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    Shanghai, PRC
    #20
    I think it's great they still sell it and it shows that people are still buying it!

    I have looked at the retina screen side by side and yes it is nice but that's about it. Nice, but no real added value (for me).

    If portability is not a big concern I'd buy the cMBP anyday. Buy the minimum spec, throw in extra RAM and an SSD at market (i.e. not crazy Apple prices) and you have a very good worktool.

    A good 512GB SSD nowadays goes for $200, why would one pay an upcharge from 128 to 512GB of $500 in a retina (or $650 in the cMPRO for SSD instead of HDD)? People earlier ranted about 5 year old technology? Well this is memory pricing from 5 years ago...
     
  21. venom600 macrumors 6502a

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    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #21
    My company refuses to buy anything but the cMBP. I'm one of four people not using one out of a few hundred (CEO has a 15" rMBP, I have a 13, and a couple of MB Airs floating around) because we have hardwired ethernet in the office and dongles get lost like crazy and they are easily repairable.
     
  22. pakupakuman, Mar 11, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2015

    pakupakuman macrumors member

    pakupakuman

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2013
    #22
    Still a Mac after all those years.

    It's still a decent computer, with a solid operating system. Many people still want ports (ethernet, usb), and this model has a lot of those. Some like to swap innards and upgrade the memory.

    Should they lower the price given the fact it hasn't been upgraded in three years? They should, but they possibly wont.

    I edited the post to mention that you can still walk into a Best Buy and always see some person gravitate towards the cMBP. Usually their first foray into Apple computers / OSX.

    ----------

    And you haven't even mentioned that whe the Air goes over the temp ceiling, it throttles back.
     
  23. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

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    #23
    Honestly, I'm always a bit amused by the "portability" argument against the cMBP.

    Yes, Apple does now make thinner and lighter laptops, but the cMBP is still smaller and lighter than your typical 13" budget Windows laptop on the market. It's a whole heck of a lot lighter than the 15" Gateway I bought as a college freshman in 2006, and I carried that thing with me everywhere. Back at the time(crippled netbooks aside) the king of portability was the 12" Powerbook. Those are both thicker than the 13" cMBP(about 1.5x) and a fair bit heavier.

    Honestly, for a few weeks after I bought my MBP, I was constantly checking my backpack to make sure I hadn't left it behind. It was so much smaller and lighter lighter than even the 13" Toshiba it replaced(bought in 2010) that I really didn't even notice it there. I still don't always notice being there.
     
  24. MarvinHC macrumors 6502a

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    #24
    It is true compared to many other machines it is very reasonable in size, but it does feel rather heavy, probably also due to the machines I have been using next to it (Lenovo X220 POS, Dell Elitebook 820, Air 11"). But today there are much lighter options out there, so in that sense it is a comparably heavy piece of equipment. For me personally as I travel a lot and I carry my Macbook along with my work Windows machine, the cMBP is not an option. For that the new Macbook would be great but given the limitations I will happily keep my 11" Air.
     
  25. ps2sunvalley macrumors newbie

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    Mar 10, 2015
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    Texas
    #25

    $200 might get you that, but it doesn't get you 500GB of storage out of the box. Yes, it is a spinny disk HDD but at least the cMBP has the capability of swapping for an SSD.

    That's why I bought a cMBP last November as part of a black Friday weekend sale at the Base Exchange, I paid $989 for it with no sales tax.

    I immediately upgraded the RAM to 16GB for under $200, and I am about to buy a 500 GB SSD for about $200, and maybe a second one too to put in the SuperDrive spot and get rid of that.

    The hardware is plenty speedy for my needs and should last a solid 5 years no problem.
     

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