[Cryonics] This is so incredibly interesting.

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by TechGod, May 27, 2014.

  1. TechGod macrumors 68040

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    #1
  2. ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

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    Hopefully, they can get the revival part worked out.
     
  3. localoid macrumors 68020

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    Along with methods to reverse the effects of Alzheimer's‎, dementia, and the other degenerative neurological diseases.

    Being rebooted as a potato doesn't sound like an enjoyable life...
     
  4. TechGod thread starter macrumors 68040

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    The do seem to say that once the damage is repaired only then will the revive the person.

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    Expected to be sorted out by 2040.

    That aside, imagine the social problems. Waking up in a new day and age with more advanced tech etc..
     
  5. decafjava macrumors 68020

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    Yea like time travel - jumping forward (only way we can).
     
  6. TechGod, Jun 4, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 4, 2014

    TechGod thread starter macrumors 68040

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    Yeah. Going in past is absolutely impossible.
     
  7. mobilehaathi macrumors G3

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    I travel forward in time quite often.
     
  8. SandboxGeneral Moderator

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    Always an interesting theory, but I don't think it will ever work. To the best of my knowledge, once a person is dead (and not necessarily the legal definition), they're dead.
     
  9. Roller macrumors 68020

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    Imagine the challenge of having to learn how to use iOS 34. :)

    As for the practicality of cryopreservation, aside from the technical challenges of revival and reversal of whatever condition led to one's being frozen in the first place, there's the issue of stability. Not only does the storage facility have to remain intact and functional despite natural disasters, wars, and other disruptions, but the company that provides the service has to stay, well, viable.
     
  10. TechGod thread starter macrumors 68040

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    Haven't a few shut done due to economic reasons?
     
  11. Astroboy907 macrumors 65816

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  13. APlotdevice, Jul 5, 2014
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2014

    APlotdevice macrumors 68040

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    I doubt we could revive any currently frozen body. The problem is when you freeze water, it tends to form very sharp crystalline structures that puncture cell membranes. The trick to making cryonics viable is to find a way to prevent such crystallization.
     
  14. SandboxGeneral Moderator

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    Not only that, but how do we reawaken, for a lack of a better term, our consciousness, our being, the thing that makes us, well, us?
     
  15. APlotdevice macrumors 68040

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    Well the whole basis of cryonics is that everything that makes us what we are is simply the arrangement of our neurons.
     
  16. SandboxGeneral Moderator

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    Coincidentally I just read this somewhat related article on io9.com

    Scientists Accidentally Discover The Brain's Consciousness "Off Switch"

    http://io9.com/scientists-accidentally-discover-the-brains-consciousne-1600230950

     
  17. TechGod thread starter macrumors 68040

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    This is extremely interesting. So in a way could this be used to "shut off" the mind then when whatever is needed to be done then reawaken the person?
     
  18. SandboxGeneral Moderator

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    No doubt it could be shut down, but I have my doubts that after being frozen and frozen for extended periods, that the mind - not the brain - could be turned on again.
     
  19. TechGod thread starter macrumors 68040

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    Its scary people have volunteered to freeze themselves with possibly no hope if revival.
     
  20. maflynn Moderator

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    But if they're at the end of their life, with an incurable disease, isn't a little hope better then no hope in their eyes?

    I'm not justifying it, I think its something that offers no real hope and preys on the fears of those who are sick, but I can see people falling for this.
     
  21. TechGod thread starter macrumors 68040

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    While I understand that, the massive culture shock after being awoken could be huge.

    If you have read "Brave New World" then you surely know that the vastly different society drives John the Savage to suicide, I think we might actually see that in these patients as well. Really, imagine waking up after 100 years? I would rather kill myself than learn that my family is dead and I was awakened for nothing.
     
  22. SandboxGeneral Moderator

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    Scary yes, but they have their own choices to make. It's not one I would make, even at the end of my natural life because I have no faith that this type of technology will ever be successful.
     
  23. TechGod thread starter macrumors 68040

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    I'm not even afraid of the technology not working, as pointed up ahead, the culture shock would be too much for me to handle I think.
     
  24. maflynn Moderator

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    I personally, don't think its feasible and that that freezing process kills the person. Plus you're relying on a company that will continue to pay the electric bill into the future when there's no incentive, i.e., not accepting clients and no other revenue source, why keep the corpsicles (sorry couldn't resist) frozen.

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    By the way, Larry Niven's A World Out of Time is an excellent book, which starts off with the main character being thawed from a cryogenic facility.
     
  25. SandboxGeneral Moderator

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    I agree the culture shock would be dramatic, but, for the sake of argument that this could work, I would hope that the person "going to sleep" would be aware that their family would be gone and the world a very different place when they're reanimated. Perhaps extensive psychological training would be done prior to being frozen.
     

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