[Cryonics] This is so incredibly interesting.

TechGod

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Along with methods to reverse the effects of Alzheimer's‎, dementia, and the other degenerative neurological diseases.

Being rebooted as a potato doesn't sound like an enjoyable life...
The do seem to say that once the damage is repaired only then will the revive the person.

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Hopefully, they can get the revival part worked out.
Expected to be sorted out by 2040.

That aside, imagine the social problems. Waking up in a new day and age with more advanced tech etc..
 

decafjava

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The do seem to say that once the damage is repaired only then will the revive the person.

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Expected to be sorted out by 2040.

That aside, imagine the social problems. Waking up in a new day and age with more advanced tech etc..
Yea like time travel - jumping forward (only way we can).
 

SandboxGeneral

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Always an interesting theory, but I don't think it will ever work. To the best of my knowledge, once a person is dead (and not necessarily the legal definition), they're dead.
 

Roller

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Expected to be sorted out by 2040.

That aside, imagine the social problems. Waking up in a new day and age with more advanced tech etc..
Imagine the challenge of having to learn how to use iOS 34. :)

As for the practicality of cryopreservation, aside from the technical challenges of revival and reversal of whatever condition led to one's being frozen in the first place, there's the issue of stability. Not only does the storage facility have to remain intact and functional despite natural disasters, wars, and other disruptions, but the company that provides the service has to stay, well, viable.
 

TechGod

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Imagine the challenge of having to learn how to use iOS 34. :)

As for the practicality of cryopreservation, aside from the technical challenges of revival and reversal of whatever condition led to one's being frozen in the first place, there's the issue of stability. Not only does the storage facility have to remain intact and functional despite natural disasters, wars, and other disruptions, but the company that provides the service has to stay, well, viable.
Haven't a few shut done due to economic reasons?
 

APlotdevice

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Hopefully, they can get the revival part worked out.
I doubt we could revive any currently frozen body. The problem is when you freeze water, it tends to form very sharp crystalline structures that puncture cell membranes. The trick to making cryonics viable is to find a way to prevent such crystallization.
 
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SandboxGeneral

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I doubt we could revive any currently frozen body. The problem is when you freeze water, it tends to form very sharp crystalline structures that puncture cell membranes. The trick to making cryonics viable is to find a way to prevent such crystallization.
Not only that, but how do we reawaken, for a lack of a better term, our consciousness, our being, the thing that makes us, well, us?
 

APlotdevice

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Not only that, but how do we reawaken, for a lack of a better term, our consciousness, our being, the thing that makes us, well, us?
Well the whole basis of cryonics is that everything that makes us what we are is simply the arrangement of our neurons.
 

SandboxGeneral

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Well the whole basis of cryonics is that everything that makes us what we are is simply the arrangement of our neurons.
Coincidentally I just read this somewhat related article on io9.com

Scientists Accidentally Discover The Brain's Consciousness "Off Switch"

http://io9.com/scientists-accidentally-discover-the-brains-consciousne-1600230950

While performing deep brain surgery on a woman with epilepsy, neuroscientists from George Washington University stimulated an area of her brain that unexpectedly — and temporarily — caused her to lose awareness. It's a discovery that could shed light on the very nature of consciousness itself.

"We describe a region in the human brain where electrical stimulation reproducibly disrupted consciousness," write the scientists in their study. It's an important finding as the "neural mechanisms that underlie consciousness are not fully understood." No doubt, consciousness is still a profound mystery, so much so that we don't know how it arises — or how it switches off

Mohamad Koubeissi and his team were using deep brain electrodes to record signals from different brain regions to figure out where the woman's seizures were coming from. They placed one electrode near a part of the deep brain called the claustrum, an area that had never been stimulated before.

The claustrum is a thin and weirdly shaped sheet of neurons that's attached to the underside of the neocortex right smack-dab in the center of the brain. Though the precise role of the claustrum is not known, it's suspected to play a role in communication between the two hemispheres of the brain, specifically those regions that control attention. It works like a conductor in an orchestra, coordinating the cerebral cortex. But instead of synchronizing musicians, it synchronizes the timescale between various brain parts, resulting in the seamless quality of conscious experience.

Helen Thomson from New Scientist reports:

When the team zapped the area with high frequency electrical impulses, the woman lost consciousness. She stopped reading and stared blankly into space, she didn't respond to auditory or visual commands and her breathing slowed. As soon as the stimulation stopped, she immediately regained consciousness with no memory of the event. The same thing happened every time the area was stimulated during two days of experiments.

To confirm that they were affecting the woman's consciousness rather than just her ability to speak or move, the team asked her to repeat the word "house" or snap her fingers before the stimulation began. If the stimulation was disrupting a brain region responsible for movement or language she would have stopped moving or talking almost immediately. Instead, she gradually spoke more quietly or moved less and less until she drifted into unconsciousness. Since there was no sign of epileptic brain activity during or after the stimulation, the team is sure that it wasn't a side effect of a seizure.

Koubeissi thinks that the results do indeed suggest that the claustrum plays a vital role in triggering conscious experience. "I would liken it to a car," he says. "A car on the road has many parts that facilitate its movement – the gas, the transmission, the engine – but there's only one spot where you turn the key and it all switches on and works together. So while consciousness is a complicated process created via many structures and networks – we may have found the key."
 

TechGod

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SandboxGeneral

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This is extremely interesting. So in a way could this be used to "shut off" the mind then when whatever is needed to be done then reawaken the person?
No doubt it could be shut down, but I have my doubts that after being frozen and frozen for extended periods, that the mind - not the brain - could be turned on again.
 

TechGod

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No doubt it could be shut down, but I have my doubts that after being frozen and frozen for extended periods, that the mind - not the brain - could be turned on again.
Its scary people have volunteered to freeze themselves with possibly no hope if revival.
 

maflynn

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Its scary people have volunteered to freeze themselves with possibly no hope if revival.
But if they're at the end of their life, with an incurable disease, isn't a little hope better then no hope in their eyes?

I'm not justifying it, I think its something that offers no real hope and preys on the fears of those who are sick, but I can see people falling for this.
 

TechGod

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But if they're at the end of their life, with an incurable disease, isn't a little hope better then no hope in their eyes?

I'm not justifying it, I think its something that offers no real hope and preys on the fears of those who are sick, but I can see people falling for this.
While I understand that, the massive culture shock after being awoken could be huge.

If you have read "Brave New World" then you surely know that the vastly different society drives John the Savage to suicide, I think we might actually see that in these patients as well. Really, imagine waking up after 100 years? I would rather kill myself than learn that my family is dead and I was awakened for nothing.
 

SandboxGeneral

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Its scary people have volunteered to freeze themselves with possibly no hope if revival.
Scary yes, but they have their own choices to make. It's not one I would make, even at the end of my natural life because I have no faith that this type of technology will ever be successful.
 

TechGod

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Scary yes, but they have their own choices to make. It's not one I would make, even at the end of my natural life because I have no faith that this type of technology will ever be successful.
I'm not even afraid of the technology not working, as pointed up ahead, the culture shock would be too much for me to handle I think.
 

maflynn

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While I understand that, the massive culture shock after being awoken could be huge. .
I personally, don't think its feasible and that that freezing process kills the person. Plus you're relying on a company that will continue to pay the electric bill into the future when there's no incentive, i.e., not accepting clients and no other revenue source, why keep the corpsicles (sorry couldn't resist) frozen.

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By the way, Larry Niven's A World Out of Time is an excellent book, which starts off with the main character being thawed from a cryogenic facility.
 

SandboxGeneral

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While I understand that, the massive culture shock after being awoken could be huge.

If you have read "Brave New World" then you surely know that the vastly different society drives John the Savage to suicide, I think we might actually see that in these patients as well. Really, imagine waking up after 100 years? I would rather kill myself than learn that my family is dead and I was awakened for nothing.
I agree the culture shock would be dramatic, but, for the sake of argument that this could work, I would hope that the person "going to sleep" would be aware that their family would be gone and the world a very different place when they're reanimated. Perhaps extensive psychological training would be done prior to being frozen.
 

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