Dead Pixels anyone?

mryingster

macrumors 6502
Feb 1, 2013
262
166
California
I've heard people say that exercising a pixel by rapidly changing the color can unstick a pixel, however, I have never had a stuck pixel unstick. I had one on my 30" and it drove me nuts.
 

weckart

macrumors 603
Nov 7, 2004
5,003
2,233
If software won't shift it, the other method is to gently rub just under and around the pixel. Mostly likely, you'll just have to learn to live with it.
 

bobesch

macrumors 68000
Oct 21, 2015
1,518
1,253
Kiel, Germany
Oh, sorry for your iBook!

I have only one Mac with a dead pixel - that's a good quote a does say a lot about quality of Apples LCD-screens.
But that dead pixel is in the middle of a 17" MBP screen and it drives me nuts. :mad:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Project Alice

pochopsp

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Apr 6, 2016
408
279
Napoli, city of sun and pizza!
thank you guys for your suggestions and comprehension. you're very kind and expert as always. I've tried everything but it seems I just have to live with it, the fact is that I'm a bit obsessed with flaws on screens, even the smallest ones.
to make matters worse another problem occurred to my iBook. I can't access to OS X Leopard anymore. After a few system reboots using the button (the OS was stuck and I couldn't shut it down normally) the iBook shows the Apple logo on the grey screen, the spinning wheel and it keeps loading forever. I've already installed Tiger on another partition to access my files but I can't access to leopard anymore. I've tried repairing permissions using utility disk but nothing.
 

AphoticD

macrumors 68000
Feb 17, 2017
1,953
2,572
Australia
thank you guys for your suggestions and comprehension. you're very kind and expert as always. I've tried everything but it seems I just have to live with it, the fact is that I'm a bit obsessed with flaws on screens, even the smallest ones.
to make matters worse another problem occurred to my iBook. I can't access to OS X Leopard anymore. After a few system reboots using the button (the OS was stuck and I couldn't shut it down normally) the iBook shows the Apple logo on the grey screen, the spinning wheel and it keeps loading forever. I've already installed Tiger on another partition to access my files but I can't access to leopard anymore. I've tried repairing permissions using utility disk but nothing.
I would try dropping Leopard into single user mode (hold cmd-s at boot). Then run `/sbin/fsck -fy` as instructed to do a forced disk repair on the Leopard volume and then type `exit` to boot. You should see the 'verbose' output of the boot process and get a better indication of where it has gotten stuck.

Another typical fix for a stuck Leopard install is to delete the "Boot Cache" by first booting into single user mode as earlier, then;
$ /sbin/fsck -fy
$ /sbin/mount -uw /
$ rm /System/Library/Extensions.mkext
$ reboot

Leopard will then recreate the extensions cache on boot and startup.

Any time you just want to just view the verbose log of the boot, hold cmd-v on startup.
 
Last edited:

Raging Dufus

macrumors 6502
Aug 2, 2018
403
637
Kansas USA
to make matters worse another problem occurred to my iBook. I can't access to OS X Leopard anymore. After a few system reboots using the button (the OS was stuck and I couldn't shut it down normally) the iBook shows the Apple logo on the grey screen, the spinning wheel and it keeps loading forever. I've already installed Tiger on another partition to access my files but I can't access to leopard anymore. I've tried repairing permissions using utility disk but nothing.
The first thing I'd try is booting into Safe Mode. Here and here are more things to try if your iBook can't get there.

You may need to delete the Tiger partition; having it there could inhibit your ability to select the Leopard partition. This sounds weird - even to me - but in my experience, sometimes your Mac needs to have only one choice; otherwise it will always default to the "good" one. Another reason to drop the Tiger partition is that trying to repair permissions on a Leopard install from Tiger will probably not have the desired effect; this function takes quite a bit longer on Leopard than it does on Tiger, it's only reasonable to assume that Leopard is checking/repairing some things that Tiger doesn't even look for.

If you just can't get into Safe Mode in Leopard, the next thing to try is Target Disk Mode. If you have another Mac running Leopard or later, see if you can boot your iBook into TDM; then connect via FireWire and troubleshoot your iBook's Leopard install from the other Mac. This can also be done the other way round (booting the other Mac into TDM, and booting your iBook from that) if the other Mac is also running Leopard.

EDIT: One more thing. In my experience, sometimes Leopard just needs to take its time "thinking." I've had a Leopard install hang in the way that you describe and, reaching the end of my troubleshooting abilities, have decided to just leave it on and spinning overnight while I slept. On a couple of occasions, I awoke the next morning to find the Mac booted into Leopard and waiting. This may have something to do with what @AphoticD suggested above; I've never tried the "fsck" repair in single user mode, it's possible that if I had I wouldn't have had to keep my Mac up all night. But Leopard is a pretty forgiving OS, sometimes it just needs time to take care of things itself. Good luck!
 
Last edited:

Raging Dufus

macrumors 6502
Aug 2, 2018
403
637
Kansas USA
Are these errors important?
Do you happen to know/remember whether or not your Leopard install was completely updated (i.e., to 10.5.8, plus all security updates)?

In searching around a bit using the errors displayed in your screenshot, most of what I'm coming up with involves problems with intermediate upgrades to Leopard: 10.5.2 caused some problems similar to what you've experienced, for some people; as did the Leopard Graphics Update after 10.5.2; and also 10.5.5 seemed to cause some issues.

For reference, see this MacRumors post from about 10 years ago. Looks like Target Disk Mode helped to save the day there, although I'm not sure that's a complete solution to your particular problem...in fact, if you're certain that you've already upgraded your system to 10.5.8, then it's probably not a solution, because 10.5.8 should have fixed those issues.

I'm afraid that's about as helpful as I'm able to be. Fear not, though, Aphotic or another guru will surely weigh in here soon.
 

bobesch

macrumors 68000
Oct 21, 2015
1,518
1,253
Kiel, Germany
Thank you both! I've tried your suggestions @AphoticD but didn't get to access yet. Here's what I get . Are these errors important?
So you have two partitions on you drive, one for Leopard, one for Tiger and you can boot into Tiger but not into Leopard?
Did you try to access the drive via Target-Disk-Mode to get access to the Leopard-partion and recover data?
Did you apply FileVault to your Leopard User-Account?
 
Last edited:

AphoticD

macrumors 68000
Feb 17, 2017
1,953
2,572
Australia
Thank you both! I've tried your suggestions @AphoticD but didn't get to access yet. Here's what I get . Are these errors important?
It points to an issue with your login. It could be FileVault related or possibly just an ACL related error.

Try booting from a Leopard install DVD (or USB), go to “Reset Password” from the Utilities menu, select your Leopard drive, then your user account and click on “Reset ACLs”. You could also try doing a password change here too.

If that doesn’t resolve it, perform a clean install of Leopard.

EDIT: also run Repair Permissions from Disk Utility via the Leopard installer disc. Leopard does take longer to perform this compared to Tiger because of the added ACL system in 10.5+.
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.