Deceptive Warranty Practice

Discussion in 'iMac' started by Stageshoot, Oct 5, 2013.

  1. Stageshoot macrumors regular

    Stageshoot

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2013
    Location:
    Central UK
    #1
    Is it just me?.

    Why do apple start warranty from Build Date and not delivery date. Surely the warranty should start from when the item arrives with thr customer and is switched on for first use.

    the 2013iMac I purchased (Ordered 28th Sept, Dispatched 3rd Oct for Delivery 8th October), shows on my support profile as having warranty starting from 2nd Oct!!

    Apple support says warranty support starts from build date on BTO. But if purchased in store its switch on date

    Very unfair as I will be away on the 8th when the iMac is due to be delivered and only have the option of leaving it with the courier for a delayed delivery on the 24th Oct. or Cancelling and returning (I did not know I would have a work trip when I ordered it on the 28th)

    That would mean almost a month of my warranty is gone before I even use it

    Anyway I just think they should treat BTOs the same way as store purchases and start warranty from switch on.

    In this case it has just hardened my resolve to cancel and return, (Especially as I will also have used my 14 day return window while I am away).

    And just have a look around for something else when I get back.

    Maybe even stick with my old mac mini and find another use for the £2300 that apple would have had.

    /RANT
     
  2. MikeChicago macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2013
    #2
    Seems odd... Check your state law and contact Apple. I agree, warranty period should start on the date when you take possession not when it was built. And before people start saying it doesn't matter I had a screen replaced on my old MacBook Pro on the very last day of AppleCare coverage :)
     
  3. Tweak3D macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2007
    #3
    Are you in the UK? Just a guess since you mentioned the price in pounds. Why does a few days matter? All of Europe, including the UK has a mandatory warranty of 2 years or more. the UK and Scotland are fortunate enough to get an even longer warranty. a few days is nothing, we get nothing like that here in the states.

    http://www.apple.com/uk/legal/statutory-warranty/
     
  4. mapleleafer macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2009
    #4
    ?
     
  5. RoryO macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2013
    #5
    Interesting... My early 2008 MacBook Pro died from the acknowledged NVidia GPU issue. Apple extended the warranty to 4 years for that problem, but mine failed about year 5, if the UK gets 6 years coverage according to that link, should I be covered still? Apple genius said no, obviously, I wonder if I'd brought up the eu regulations if I may get a different answer.? Seems pretty much the definition of a latent defect at manufacture based on Apples acknowledgement of the issue (mentioned in the small print on the link)
     
  6. gnasher729, Oct 5, 2013
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2013

    gnasher729 macrumors P6

    gnasher729

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    #6
    There is no such thing as "mandatory warranty". There are statutory rights that a consumer has against the seller, which is not quite the same thing. And you are confusing "claim period" with having any useful rights.


    "Claim period" of six years means that up to six years after the sale, one can look at whether you have rights or not. After six years the seller doesn't have to talk to you, whatever happened. There are items that last longer than computers. If I buy a marble statue for my garden that should last for decades, any legal relationship between me and the seller ends after six years. In the case of your GPU, Apple gave you one year warranty. The seller (which may or may not be Apple) probably had to fix the problem for two years. The manufacturer voluntarily fixed this particular problem for four years.

    To the OP: Where did you find "build date"? I can find "Purchase date". And a purchase doesn't happen when you order, it happens when the item leaves control of the seller. When you leave the store with your Mac, or when the UPS man puts it on his van.
     
  7. Brian Y macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2012
    #7
    To use the SOGA protection, you would have to prove that there was an inherent fault with your machine.

    Since Apple have already stated that there was a defect with these machines - a piece of paper (from a Genius, etc) stating that your machine died because of the Nvidia problem would be enough to prove this.

    ----------

    For the record, it goes by purchase date. And it's the same in-store.

    If you buy a laptop from an Apple store, and then realise "crap I need to go away" and don't turn it on for a month, you won't get an extra month of warranty.
     
  8. RoryO macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2013
    #8


    I think it may not apply in my case anyway as I bought it second hand, albeit just 14 days old, but still I wasn't the original purchaser who bought it from Apple.
     
  9. Kayan, Oct 6, 2013
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2013

    Kayan macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2010
    Location:
    CA
    #9
    Good clarifications.
    And to OP: Apple has one of the best warranties in computers and by far the best customer service in general (one important reason I stick around w/ Apple). One time I was in a situation where I was 2 or 3 weeks out of warranty on my iPhone, but I still took it in and they understood my problem and still fixed it as if it was under warranty. They are usually very understanding. If not, get a different Genius. Also, I would think that you would be hard-pressed to find another computer company that does anything different with when they start their warranties. I think this is a standard practice and you are just learning about it for the first time, it's not deceptive.

    Besides, would you rather that they shipped your computer from a distant location w/o a warranty and then something happened to it? If that were the case, I'm sure you would be wishing they had started the warranty before shipping it.
     
  10. jaxhunter macrumors regular

    jaxhunter

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2012
    Location:
    Arizona
    #10
    That start date should correspond to the date when the Mac was paid for, plus or minus a little time for credit card processing and the overseas AppleCare databases linking with the databases for the country in which you live. It's the same time frame as when you purchase a Mac from an Apple Store, except you walk out the door with it and the processing delays are virtually non-existent.

    That being said, just call AppleCare and tell them the situation and when you received the computer. They should be able to adjust the start date for you, or at least make a note of it so your system can be covered with a CS code for a little while. It shouldn't be a big deal. Just be nice about it because it's up to the discretion of the AppleCare rep you talk to.
     
  11. fhopper macrumors member

    fhopper

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Location:
    Wichita Ks.
  12. jaxhunter macrumors regular

    jaxhunter

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2012
    Location:
    Arizona
    #12
    You always get AppleCare. Your complementary warranty is AppleCare. The distinction is that you canalso pay to extend your AppleCare support.
     
  13. fhopper macrumors member

    fhopper

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Location:
    Wichita Ks.
    #13
    Would anyone chose to NOT buy the extended AppleCare? If you have had any experience with AppleCare like I have then you would know it is dirt cheap for what you get... provided you take your computer in a couple months before it ends for a tune up and you will get back a near new computer.
     
  14. mapleleafer macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2009
    #14
    At least one. Most things that go wrong will go wrong within the first year. If nothing goes wrong within the first year, then I do not buy AppleCare. It's a gamble, but it's a bet I've now won twice.
     
  15. MattInOz macrumors 68030

    MattInOz

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2006
    Location:
    Sydney
    #15
    I've only seen "build date" in Warranty registration on Apple's website when you buy from a third party. There should be a link to send them "Proof of Purchase" information and they'll update the records to purchase date.
     
  16. joshdammit macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2013
    #16
    Incorrect (although this is a trivial argument.) Apple provides you with an extended warranty for one year, and 90 days of phone support. The AppleCare Protection Plan is defined as two additional years of extended warranty and phone support (as far as Macs go, anyway.)

    I know, I know, six in one, half dozen in the other. But if we're getting technical, your computer does not come with AppleCare, based on Apple's definition of the product.

    This is what AppleCare employees are taught during their training.
     
  17. jaxhunter, Oct 11, 2013
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2013

    jaxhunter macrumors regular

    jaxhunter

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2012
    Location:
    Arizona
    #17
    You are technically correct, which is the best kind of correct. You are hereby promoted to Bureaucrat Grade 37.

    Edit: Although, you did state that the initial warranty is an extended warranty, which is not technically correct. You are hereby demoted to Grade 38.
     
  18. wrinkster22 macrumors 68030

    wrinkster22

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2011
    Location:
    Toronto
    #18
    Agreed. My iPod took a week to come because of engraving -_- and My warranty started before I got it
     
  19. joshdammit macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2013
    #19
    Whoops!! I meant to say limited warranty. Good catch!
     
  20. marsmissions macrumors 6502

    marsmissions

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Location:
    Washington, US
    #20
    The sense of entitlement in this thread is overwhelming.

    If you complain hard enough I'm sure they'll change it for you, but you're going to have to be a jerk about it.
     
  21. yjchua95 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2011
    Location:
    GVA, KUL, MEL (current), ZQN
    #21
    In Malaysia (where I live), the AASP (Apple Authorised Service Provider) guy told me that they measure warranty from the date you set up the Mac for the first time. The techie told me that when you set it up for the first time, the Mac will send some metadata to Apple's servers indicating that it's activated.
     
  22. HenryDJP macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2012
    Location:
    United States
    #22
    Here's not only my own experience but the experience of many that I've read about. Apple takes care of customers even when they are outside of their warranty. I know a few people personally that didn't even buy Applecare and they had issues a month past their included warranty Apple did the repairs completely for free. People have dropped and cracked the glass on their iPads (and the warranty doesn't cover that unless you have Applecare Plus) and Apple swapped out the iPads. I've read about that here on MR multiple times.
    I'm 99.999% certain that if Apple started a customer's warranty on the day the shipped the product they will still cover the customer up to the day the customer actually received it which would be just a few days after they received it.

    On a different note the OP is expecting too much if he/she expects any company to hold the warranty start date until he/she gets back from their trip if he/she missed the FedEx delivery. People go on trips for months. That wouldn't be fair to have a warranty start when you get back home or when you decide to finally open the package unless it's a holiday gift and in that case you get a gift receipt.
     

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