Do I have everything for a HDD/SSD change?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Rockadile, Apr 16, 2015.

  1. Rockadile macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2012
    #1
    I'm going to swap my late 2011 MBP HDD to an SSD. It's on 10.7.5 and would like to go 10.10

    Do I just need the SSD and external HDD enclosure to migrate data?
    I want to do a clean Yosemite install for the SSD and than use migration assistant.
     
  2. JTToft macrumors 68040

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    Aarhus, Denmark
    #2
    You need a Phillips #00 and Torx T6 screwdriver to perform the installation itself.
    Otherwise, you're good.

    The OS X installation can be done via Internet Recovery, but that will give you the OS X version the machine shipped with. So if you want to start fresh directly from Yosemite, you'll have to create an installation medium.

    Download Yosemite from the App store and then use DiskMaker X to create a bootable USB flash drive or SD card.
     
  3. Rockadile thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 11, 2012
    #3
    I'm wondering if I should start clean and use migration assistant or clone transfer with disk utility.
    It seems like I'd be doing the same thing.

    If I install the SSD and have the old HDD as external, what would be my next step?
    Boot into the Yosemite installation or my old HDD and start disk utilities for cloning perhaps?
     
  4. JTToft macrumors 68040

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    #4
    That depends how you want to proceed. You have a few options:

    - Complete clone via Disk Utility
    - Complete Migration Assistant
    - Complete Time Machine restore (if you have one)
    - Fresh OS X installation with partial Migration Assistant for your data.
    - Fresh OS X installation with partial Time Machine restore for your data.

    I'd do the clone via Disk Utility - that's the fastest and easiest.
    For that, you'd connect your HDD externally and the SSD internally (or vice versa), boot into Internet Recovery or from your installation medium, open disk utility and use the "Restore" function.
     
  5. Rockadile thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 11, 2012
    #5
    It looks like you have a similar computer setup reading your sig.
    Which option did you take? I read it was better to do a fresh install when moving to the next OS version.
    Also does your RAM run at 1600? I just bought 1333 thinking it was the max for this model year.
     
  6. JTToft macrumors 68040

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    #6
    Back in 2012 when I installed my 830, I opted for a fresh installation of OS X Mountain Lion (then the current version) with a partial Time Machine restore for my data and settings, etc.

    Yes, my RAM does run at 1600MHz. Contrary to Apple's specifications listing a maximum of 8GB 1333MHz for the 2011 models, they will actually all take 16GB 1600MHz without issues.
     
  7. Rockadile thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 11, 2012
    #7
    Do you know if I can do a TM restore that was on Lion with a Yosemite fresh install?

    I just bought the 850 Evo, another stick of 8GB, and OWC enclosure that has FW800.
    Fly baby fly :cool:
     
  8. JTToft macrumors 68040

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    #8
    - You can. If you do the fresh install and then restore from Time Machine, it won't restore the OS from TM but just your data and settings, etc.

    - Good choice!
     
  9. Rockadile thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 11, 2012
    #9
    Thanks mate.

    So many choices available to do this. I think I'll have to do the cloning route with FW800 because our model year doesn't have usb 3.0
     
  10. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    Auckland
    #10
    Out of interest how do you know that the ram is actually running at 1600?

    ----------

    If you don't have any issues with your current install then cloning is the safest way of:

    1. Not introducing any new issues
    2. Not wasting any (re)setup time on any apps etc

    Good luck and enjoy!
     
  11. pingfan59 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2011
    #11
    I just upgraded to a Samsung 840 EVO 512gb ssd in my early 2011 15" MBP

    I used carbon copy cloner and even though that took about 4 hours, the opening and swapping using the ifixit guide took about 15 to 20 minutes max.

    Been about a week and still going great, not to mention time machine backups happen almost instantly now instead of taking awhile.

    I used the spudger, anti-static bracelet, the torx t6, and the phillips #00
     
  12. Rockadile thread starter macrumors regular

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    #12
    How many GB cloned and by which connection :eek:
     
  13. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    Auckland
    #13
    TM backups to where? Backup speed is normally determined by the write speed of the target unless there is a slower interface in the way, not the read speed of the source...??
     
  14. JTToft macrumors 68040

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    #14
    - Oh, let's see... From a few places. :)
    (Geekbench scores)

    - Not to mention by the Time Machine software itself. In my experience it never runs at the full transfer capacity of the target.
     

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  15. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #15
    About This Mac tells you what is installed rather than what it is actually running at, my Early 2011 13" takes (and the bus run at) 1333, I thought you were saying your machine <should> be a 1333 but was accepting and running at 1600, looks like yours is specced to accept (and run) at 1600...according to ATM.
     
  16. JTToft macrumors 68040

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    #16
    - I'm not so sure. How might the machine know that the modules are 1600MHz without being able to run them at that speed?
    By that logic, if I were to install 1866Mhz modules, I should see 1866Mhz listed in various spots (About This Mac, etc.), even though the machine isn't compatible with that speed. I don't have any to test, but it would surprise me enormously if that were the case.

    - Your 13" will take 1600MHz as well, unless it's faulty. All 2011 (early and late, 13", 15", and 17") accepts a maximum of 16GB 1600MHz.
     
  17. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #17
    RAM is (mostly), downwards compatible so you should be able to put 1600 modules into a 1333 machine and the modules should clock down to the bus speed. The bus <cannot> clock up. The fact that they fit and work does not necessarily mean they run at the modules maximum rated speed. Accepting the size (16GB), is determined by the number of address lines basically, and is nothing to do with the bus speed.

    I don't know of any utility that will report the negotiated speed of the modules in the same way that DriveDX will for SATA connections.

    And yes, quite possible that the module reports size and speed rating in the same way the a SATA disk reports a huge amount of information to its controller and an iPhone will tell iTunes it is white.

    You may or may not see 1866 reported if that speed didn't exist when the RAM controller was designed...that is into the unknown, quite possible that the module reports a code, say "T" that the controller knows is 1600, if the 1866 reports "Q", the controller may not know what that is if "Q" didn't exist at the time the controller was designed, it may just error.

    My About This Mac reports that it accepts "up to 2 modules of 1333" and both are in use, total of 16GB.
     
  18. JTToft macrumors 68040

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    #18
    - Yes, naturally. That much is common knowledge.

    - Strangely, that section of ATM will report the same clock speed as is actually installed as being the maximum it accepts (unless, of course, that installed speed is above what the machine supports).
    Mine said 1333, as well, before I upgraded to 1600.

    Just take OWC's word for it if you don't believe the software (link in previous post):

     
  19. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #19
    Sure but none of that explicitly states the RAM is actually running at 1600, those <marketing> statements could all be made about 1600 RAM that will fit and function which is, as you say, common knowledge, I was asking what made you sure the RAM was actually running at 1600 and it seems there isn't any firm indication. If the bus clock speed is 1333 then that is it, 1600 can be fitted/utilised whatever but unless someone states that Apple actually made the bus run at 1600 then your RAM is still running at 1333.

    It was a point of interest that is all, it seems ATM just reports what is fitted, probably a careless programming shortcut if 1333 was the fastest available at the time.
     
  20. JTToft macrumors 68040

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    #20
    - My lord...
    Alright, fine. I'll shut up.

    http://macperformanceguide.com/blog/2012/20120620_6-MacBookPro-1600MHz-memory.html
     
  21. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #21
    Sorry you are getting frustrated but obviously a 0-3% improvement doesn't mean the modules are running at 1600 (which would be 27% faster), it indicates the faster bus settle time that the modules have (needed to keep up when fitted to a machine bus running at 1600), gives a marginal improvement on a 1333 bus machine.

    Yes the modules can be utilised, yes the motherboard supports (ie you can fit) the faster modules, (no surprise).

    But hey, as I said it was just a point of interest. No biggie.
     
  22. Fishrrman macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #22
    OP asked above:
    [[ Do I just need the SSD and external HDD enclosure to migrate data? ]]

    You don't absolutely "need" one, but it would be a VERY good idea to get an enclosure for the old drive, and then use it to "prep and test" the NEW drive BEFORE you do the drive swap.

    By doing the prep-and-test "externally", you will KNOW that you have a good SSD, you will KNOW that you have a bootable OS on it, and you will KNOW that the drive is "as you like it" before you go through the work of opening the MacBook and installing it.

    And you'll have an enclosure into which to put the old drive once you have it in-hand.

    I picked up one of these recently and it's been a good performer:
    http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003VKTJGW...UTF8&colid=R75PP4I2A0BE&coliid=I3DOKZ31SP7539
     
  23. Rockadile thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 11, 2012
    #23
    I guess for the future 2011 MBP owners out there looking to upgrade RAM, get the 1600mhz for that extra bit of speed. There also about $10 cheaper than the 1333mhz version when I bought another RAM stick yesterday probably due to being older part now.


    Hi.
    I bought the OWC Mercury Elite Pro mini enclosure.
    Testing the SSD in it would be a good idea. What steps would I need to take?
     
  24. pingfan59 macrumors member

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    Aug 9, 2011
    #24
    A little over 300gb cloned via usb 2 connection

    ----------

    using a WD Mybook via firewire port and the speed increase is probably coming from the preparing back up part of my TM backups, I havent used a stop watch but the difference was noticeable.
     
  25. Fishrrman macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #25
    OP wrote above:
    [[ Testing the SSD in it would be a good idea. What steps would I need to take? ]]

    Just initialize it and either clone over your existing OS, or install a "fresh" copy of the OS onto it.

    The idea is to get the OS and your data installed, and do a test boot, before you install it internally.

    That should be "good enough"...
     

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