Do iWork apps support dark mode currently?

matankai

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Feb 17, 2012
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Meaning, is dark mode applied at the system level to all apps using native UI elements, or does it still require the dev to update/enable?
 

matankai

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Feb 17, 2012
18
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Nope, it requires the dev to update their app - no extra work is really required if you're using standard UI elements, but I presume it's a precautionary measure in case there are any contrast issues with the colours used in the apps.
Got it. Thank you!
 

MacGizmo

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Apr 27, 2003
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Unfortunately, Apple's apps and small but profitable utilities will likely be the only apps that take advantage of Dark Mode for quite a while. I can't see apps like MS Office and any of Adobe's apps being re-written to use Apple's UI elements just for Dark Mode (though Adobe apps already have their own "dark themes" that are similar).
 

Cougarcat

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Sep 19, 2003
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Unfortunately, Apple's apps and small but profitable utilities will likely be the only apps that take advantage of Dark Mode for quite a while. I can't see apps like MS Office and any of Adobe's apps being re-written to use Apple's UI elements just for Dark Mode (though Adobe apps already have their own "dark themes" that are similar).
It’s really not a lot of work. If they bothered with Touchbar support they’ll do it.
 

fisherking

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Jul 16, 2010
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the Mail app is an interesting example of why this doesn't work; am typing white text on a dark background, but that's not what my recipient sees (unless they're on the mojave beta running dark mode). i guess the idea is that... the text, the content is the thing, and color is irrelevant.

so... not sure it makes sense there, and definitely sure it would be pointless in Pages (am giving it some time in Mail)...
 

borgranta

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May 9, 2018
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If you print an email will it print black text a white background or white text on a black background
[doublepost=1530401237][/doublepost]
the Mail app is an interesting example of why this doesn't work; am typing white text on a dark background, but that's not what my recipient sees (unless they're on the mojave beta running dark mode). i guess the idea is that... the text, the content is the thing, and color is irrelevant.

so... not sure it makes sense there, and definitely sure it would be pointless in Pages (am giving it some time in Mail)...
Perhaps they should ad an option to send the email in dark mode in which case the white text would stand out on the black background.
 

fisherking

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If you print an email will it print black text a white background or white text on a black background
[doublepost=1530401237][/doublepost]
Perhaps they should ad an option to send the email in dark mode in which case the white text would stand out on the black background.
1. email will print white, only the Mail interface shows white text on a dark background.

2. that's more a condition of the recipient's program; all we're really doing is typing text; it's not a graphics app.

EDIT: it would be pretty horrible to default to white text on a dark background; a printer would be wasting a phenomenal amount of ink to cover a white piece of paper!
 

Internet Enzyme

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Feb 21, 2016
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Either only the chrome will be dark or they’ll add an option, like in Mail. I expect they won’t do that because the point of Pages is you see what you get.
I figure they'll just update the surrounding toolbar and formatting elements to work in dark mode. Of course. But I feel like that will be kind of jarring. Seems like an app that doesnt really work in dark mode
 

mixel

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Jan 12, 2006
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Dark UI but a white page makes sense and is how it would have to work. You’re still laying out text on a white piece of paper. I don’t think that’s at all jarring?

A text editor on the other hand, like text wrangler, BBEdit etc should fully support light text in dark mode (if they don’t already?) because that’s not emulating a white sheet and has no reason to pretend to be such.

Likewise with mail, I’m glad it’s light text on dark there - until you get html based emails that specify otherwise.
 

dsemf

macrumors 6502
Jul 26, 2014
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For Mail, I turn off the View preference Use dark backgrounds for messages. For me, this focuses the attention on the message. Everything else is dark and fades into the background.

DS
 

redheeler

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Oct 17, 2014
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A text editor on the other hand, like text wrangler, BBEdit etc should fully support light text in dark mode (if they don’t already?) because that’s not emulating a white sheet and has no reason to pretend to be such.
With Rich Text Format (RTF) editors such as Text Edit where you can manually specify a text color, it makes sense to maintain a white background for consistency, in case the text color has been set to black or a dark color where a white background is presumed. For plain text or code editors, it really doesn't matter.

BBEdit already has a dark mode option.
 
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Marc Evans

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Oct 11, 2018
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USA
I genuinely would like someone to explain the fascination they have with dark mode? It's actually counter to the way human's brains work and takes more effort on the part of the brain to process light text on a dark background.

If "dark mode" were natural, we would have started writing on black paper with chalk in school. Even the old dark chalkboards got replaced with whiteboards because that's how humans receive visual data best.

Sigh.

I'll go out on a limb and predict that "dark mode" doesn't survive two OS releases and whoever dreamed it up won't work at Apple by the time it fades into oblivion.
 
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fisherking

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I genuinely would like someone to explain the fascination they have with dark mode? It's actually counter to the way human's brains work and takes more effort on the part of the brain to process light text on a dark background.

If "dark mode" were natural, we would have started writing on black paper with chalk in school. Even the old dark chalkboards got replaced with whiteboards because that's how humans receive visual data best.

Sigh.

I'll go out on a limb and predict that "dark mode" doesn't survive two OS releases and whoever dreamed it up won't work at Apple by the time it fades into oblivion.
making things up doesn't accomplish much. "counter to the way human's brains work"? it's an aesthetic call, and... works for some of us. i mean, i've been reading white-on-black on my iphone (and ipod touch, and palm organizers) for years... and prefer it. i like dark mode, find it... soothing, warmer. but that's just me.

if it's not for you, that's fine. but no need to pretend yours is the superior viewpoint; it's just one point-of-view, in a world where there are many.
 
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MacGizmo

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I genuinely would like someone to explain the fascination they have with dark mode?
Lots and lots of people like the aesthetic. Why is that so difficult to understand? Lots of people prefer black cars, despite the numerous inarguable problems with them (paint fade, higher heat retention, pain in the ass to keep clean, etc.)

It's actually counter to the way human's brains work and takes more effort on the part of the brain to process light text on a dark background.
You have scientific evidence to support that? I don't mean a link to one or two studies... I mean overwhelming proof that every last person on the planet has a difficult time reading or even looking at light text on dark backgrounds.

If "dark mode" were natural, we would have started writing on black paper with chalk in school. Even the old dark chalkboards got replaced with whiteboards because that's how humans receive visual data best.
We started out on black slate chalkboards, replaced them with black & dark green synthetic chalkboards because they were cheaper. We then replaced those with whiteboards because they were cleaner, and cheaper to produce (along with the markers that were also cheaper to produce and lasted longer than chalk). Whiteboards had nothing to do with data retention of the brain.

I'll go out on a limb and predict that "dark mode" doesn't survive two OS releases and whoever dreamed it up won't work at Apple by the time it fades into oblivion.
You apparently don't know much about Apple and their OS history. Not only is it not going away (probably ever), but it's probably going to be the default within two to three releases. It's already in the next release, so you're already half-way to losing your bet.
 
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flyinmac

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Sep 2, 2006
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United States
EDIT: it would be pretty horrible to default to white text on a dark background; a printer would be wasting a phenomenal amount of ink to cover a white piece of paper!
Introducing ADM Paper.... the latest innovation from Apple. “Apple Dark Mode Paper”

It’ll come in Black... and require your printer to support Apple’s patented ADM technology available to printer manufactures under an “reasonable” license fee that adds a “modest” price increase to be distributed with the “Made for ADM” logo.
 

fisherking

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Jul 16, 2010
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No, not my intention to be sarcastic. I really believe MacGismo misunderstood what Marc Evans was saying.
they're expressing opinions (marc evans, for example). and all of it is worth discussion, as long as we understand that. perhaps frustrating when people state their opinions as if they were facts...
 
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MacGizmo

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Listen MacGismo, you are talking about aesthetics while the guy is talking ERGONOMICS. A huge difference that
Sir Jonathan Paul Ive seems unable to comprehend
I was directly addressing his individual points. His post is discussing both aesthetics and ergonomics... and in both cases, he's making the wildly incorrect assumption that his own aesthetic tastes are shared by the majority (they aren't), and trying to justify it with an ergonomic argument (which he himself points out is not shared by an awful lot of people).
 
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