Do you still buy physical media?

Do you still buy physical media? (DVD/BR)

  • YES

    Votes: 221 54.2%
  • NO

    Votes: 136 33.3%
  • STREAMING ONLY (Netflix/Prime etc)

    Votes: 51 12.5%

  • Total voters
    408

jwolf6589

macrumors 68000
Dec 15, 2010
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Colorado
I bought a few films from Redbox since they've been clearing out product for the year end. Also supposedly they are giving up on games, so getting console games has been cheap. I got the films from Redbox because the films I wanted weren't discounted digitally. So I bought $4 & $6 films, and now my PS4 disc drive has something to do.
Redbox is no more?
 

JayMysterio

macrumors 6502a
Apr 24, 2010
888
15,386
Rock Ridge, California
Redbox is no more?
They are still around. It seems they've decided to focus on films only. As they've got their own streaming platform as well as their boxes. I was at a Gamestop getting a gift, and the store person told another customer to look for a game they were out of, to check Redbox as they clearing out all physical games.
 
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MagnusVonMagnum

macrumors 603
Jun 18, 2007
5,165
1,380
we moved down sized and discarded all the physical media.
-ripped the stuff we wanted needed
-recycled the paper and plastic case
-tossed like a 1,000 CD/DVD disk

could not give them away
Congratulations. You just broke the law. You are not allowed legally to rip your discs and then just throw them away, else you have zero proof you ever bought them in the first place, let alone own them. And I call BS on being able to sell them, let along give them away (there are forums on the Net that would scream at you for tossing them as they'd gladly take them. I believe your entire post is nothing but posturing because it doesn't check with reality. The poll on this APPLE SITE alone suggests over 50% of all Apple users still use physical media, let alone the rest of the world whose computers never gave it up in the first place). The local AV Exchange store will gladly buy DVDs and BDs. They don't pay much ($1-4 a disc depending on what it is typically), but across hundreds it's still hundreds of dollars back.

Other reasons to buy physical media:

1> They can't take it away from you (they could technically issue a recall code to disable your drive, but with a proper drive, MakeMKV will ignore it anyway as it should; you paid for it and so they shouldn't be able to just take it because the country is owned by big corporations). It's simple enough to dump them and stream them locally. Keep the originals as hard backups.

2> Only physical media has had DTS:X thus far including the entire Harry Potter series on Ultra 4K Blu-Ray. The overhead sound with Harry Potter on a DTS:X capable setup is AMAZING. If you like this series alone, you are missing out BIG TIME. Some movies on iTunes still don't have the Atmos tracks that some UHD discs have as well for that matter (for unknown reasons). Who knows if Apple will ever get the Atmos tracks added.

3> Streaming 4K has caught up with perhaps 2K discs, but the 4K video quality is not equivalent. "Good enough" doesn't cut it on 150" home projector screens, unfortunately.

4> Most Blu-Rays and Ultra Blu-Rays give you a digital copy on streaming sites like iTunes and Movies Anywhere these days anyway so why wouldn't you want both? Hard backup, etc. Some trade codes, etc. if they don't want them (not sure of the legality of that, though).

5> 3D video/movies (other than sites like Vudu) are still mostly disc only. I get it that many don't like 3D, but those of us that do need 3D discs (I dump mine to a hard drive and use a Zidoo X9S for playback)
 

ftaok

macrumors 603
Jan 23, 2002
6,181
1,184
East Coast
Congratulations. You just broke the law. You are not allowed legally to rip your discs and then just throw them away, else you have zero proof you ever bought them in the first place, let alone own them.
I find this interesting. Speaking about US laws only, I have a question.

Is the physical DVD/disc the proof of ownership, or is the the "proof of purchase/UPC code" on the box enough to keep?

1578322122815.png


I would contend, in the unlikely case that the MPAA (or whatever group), decided to go after @jeyf , he could theoretically show them the thousands of UPC codes that he snipped off of the artwork.
 
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MagnusVonMagnum

macrumors 603
Jun 18, 2007
5,165
1,380
I find this interesting. Speaking about US laws only, I have a question.

Is the physical DVD/disc the proof of ownership, or is the the "proof of purchase/UPC code" on the box enough to keep?

View attachment 887016

I would contend, in the unlikely case that the MPAA (or whatever group), decided to go after @jeyf , he could theoretically show them the thousands of UPC codes that he snipped off of the artwork.
Well, it's an unlikely scenario yes and I couldn't say what they might accept or not, especially if it went to trial. Due to the onerous DMCA law in the USA, technically you shouldn't be able to rip the discs in the first place as circumventing protection is listed as being illegal. But that onus might be on the makers of the software (or even just the guy that cracked it) and not the users. In the USA, the DMCA is rather vague and thus must go to trial at the Supreme Court level to determine what is "fair use" and what is not. Neither side wants to risk losing it all so such things have been avoided thus far.

Regardless, it seems to me that a proof of purchase or a receipt or photo only proves you owned the discs at one time previously. It does not mean you still own them. If you said you threw them away (or worse yet sold them), it means you lost or sold ANY AND ALL RIGHTS to use those digital files. In other words, if a thief steals you actual discs, you MUST destroy the digital copies as well because without the originals, the copies are not "fair use" as you no longer own the originals. Any damages recovered would be 100% on your insurance and/or catching the thief and recovering your property. Yes, that sucks. It's life. Get over it. Most real world people, IMO, probably would not destroy any such thing and would instead take their chances as some out-of-print movies cannot be replaced even if you're financially compensated by your insurance for them. Such is also life. You roll the dice and you take your chances. Choose poorly and just look at that bastard from Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade that let that German woman choose for him...dust in the wind. ;)
 

BODYBUILDERPAUL

macrumors 68000
Feb 9, 2009
1,719
1,382
Barcelona
I find it comical that people worry about it being against the law to rip a disc. For God sake people, when you see the damage that the Governments are doing to the environment, the world, climate change and destroying each other like at present, ripping a disc for ones enjoyment seems rather mind. Do you all agree on this?
My advice... be confident and listen to yourself - do what makes you happy - there'll always be people that try to prevent you from doing things but that's because they usually have sad and very dull lives!
- - Post merged: - -

Congratulations. You just broke the law. You are not allowed legally to rip your discs and then just throw them away, else you have zero proof you ever bought them in the first place, let alone own them. And I call BS on being able to sell them, let along give them away (there are forums on the Net that would scream at you for tossing them as they'd gladly take them. I believe your entire post is nothing but posturing because it doesn't check with reality. The poll on this APPLE SITE alone suggests over 50% of all Apple users still use physical media, let alone the rest of the world whose computers never gave it up in the first place). The local AV Exchange store will gladly buy DVDs and BDs. They don't pay much ($1-4 a disc depending on what it is typically), but across hundreds it's still hundreds of dollars back.

Other reasons to buy physical media:

1> They can't take it away from you (they could technically issue a recall code to disable your drive, but with a proper drive, MakeMKV will ignore it anyway as it should; you paid for it and so they shouldn't be able to just take it because the country is owned by big corporations). It's simple enough to dump them and stream them locally. Keep the originals as hard backups.

2> Only physical media has had DTS:X thus far including the entire Harry Potter series on Ultra 4K Blu-Ray. The overhead sound with Harry Potter on a DTS:X capable setup is AMAZING. If you like this series alone, you are missing out BIG TIME. Some movies on iTunes still don't have the Atmos tracks that some UHD discs have as well for that matter (for unknown reasons). Who knows if Apple will ever get the Atmos tracks added.

3> Streaming 4K has caught up with perhaps 2K discs, but the 4K video quality is not equivalent. "Good enough" doesn't cut it on 150" home projector screens, unfortunately.

4> Most Blu-Rays and Ultra Blu-Rays give you a digital copy on streaming sites like iTunes and Movies Anywhere these days anyway so why wouldn't you want both? Hard backup, etc. Some trade codes, etc. if they don't want them (not sure of the legality of that, though).

5> 3D video/movies (other than sites like Vudu) are still mostly disc only. I get it that many don't like 3D, but those of us that do need 3D discs (I dump mine to a hard drive and use a Zidoo X9S for playback)
Your comments a really only valid for a few die hard AV enthusiasts. Very few people own 150" screens. iTunes 4K Dolby Vision and HD film looks outstanding on my LG 55" OLED. Apple seem to always get the colour accuracy 100% perfect, i've had discs in the past with over saturated colours and orange Trump style skin/faces.
Please remember that the Movies Anywhere is for the USA only. The USA is a country in 1 of 200 - that's 0.5% of the world!

If you love your old discs great. Buy what makes you happy. I personally detest discs (having had to use them for two evenings when I was without my Mac & Apple TV) and never want to go back to such an old fashioned product that deserves to remain in the 20th century.
 
Last edited:

dazz87

macrumors 65816
Sep 24, 2007
1,380
1,400
If physical medias results in the best possible picture and audio quality then YES.....
 
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jblagden

macrumors 65816
Aug 16, 2013
1,158
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If physical medias results in the best possible picture and audio quality then YES.....
Not to mention permanent ownership instead of relying on streaming services which temporarily lease content. Streaming is very convenient, but a major downside is that streaming services drop content all the time.

Once Netflix drops one of my favorite shows, I pick it up on disc. Well, unless I'm waiting for the Blu-Ray release. MacGyver is a great example. Netflix dropped it in July 2017, CBS released it in October of 2018. Poor initial sales - Likely to due a lack of awareness on the part of consumers, it didn't sell well, at least initially. In fact, I just found out about and subsequently purchased it last month. However, a German media distribution company called Koch Media will be producing Blu-Rays of the rest of the series later this year. Another perhaps not-so-great example is White Collar, which I'm still hoping will eventually make it to Blu-Ray. The first season Blu-Ray of White Collar didn't sell well at the time due to a number of factors, but since a lot of things have changed since 2009-2010, it's probably a great time for a Blu-Ray release.
 
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jeyf

macrumors 65816
Jan 20, 2009
1,405
611
-when the physical media changes lots of content gets lost.

old school:
every year there is less and less physical media and the hardware tools to play this on deteriorates just a little bit more. Till its 99.99% gone.
 

jwolf6589

macrumors 68000
Dec 15, 2010
1,668
229
Colorado
Not to mention permanent ownership instead of relying on streaming services which temporarily lease content. Streaming is very convenient, but a major downside is that streaming services drop content all the time.

Once Netflix drops one of my favorite shows, I pick it up on disc. Well, unless I'm waiting for the Blu-Ray release. MacGyver is a great example. Netflix dropped it in July 2017, CBS released it in October of 2018. Poor initial sales - Likely to due a lack of awareness on the part of consumers, it didn't sell well, at least initially. In fact, I just found out about and subsequently purchased it last month. However, a German media distribution company called Koch Media will be producing Blu-Rays of the rest of the season later this year. Another perhaps not-so-great example is White Collar, which I'm still hoping will eventually make it to Blu-Ray. The first season Blu-Ray of White Collar didn't sell well at the time due to a number of factors, but since a lot of things have changed since 2009-2010, it's probably a great time for a Blu-Ray release.
they also dropped the X-files. I have the DVD seasons however.
 

Rigby

macrumors 601
Aug 5, 2008
4,911
3,860
San Jose, CA
Your comments a really only valid for a few die hard AV enthusiasts. Very few people own 150" screens. iTunes 4K Dolby Vision and HD film looks outstanding on my LG 55" OLED.
Well, I use a projector (although my screen is only 120"), but iTunes movies look great on it ...

Also, despite all the doomsday prophecies, not a single movie has been removed from my library (out of several hundred). However, I have gained around 100 free 4K upgrades. Try that with your discs. :p
 
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Rigby

macrumors 601
Aug 5, 2008
4,911
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San Jose, CA
You get digital with most disks, often at no additional cost.
Only when they are newish, and most of these digital copies do not redeem directly in iTunes anymore (which means no free 4K upgrades, even if they transfer to your iTunes library via Movies Anywhere). I have received upgrades for many movies that I bought years ago for $4.99 or similar sale prices.
 

ftaok

macrumors 603
Jan 23, 2002
6,181
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East Coast
Only when they are newish, and most of these digital copies do not redeem directly in iTunes anymore (which means no free 4K upgrades, even if they transfer to your iTunes library via Movies Anywhere). I have received upgrades for many movies that I bought years ago for $4.99 or similar sale prices.
Most of the studios are using Movies Anywhere, so if you redeem through MA, just link your iTunes to it and it'll show up in your iTunes library. Not sure if it will redeem in 4K, though.
 
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BODYBUILDERPAUL

macrumors 68000
Feb 9, 2009
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Well, I use a projector (although my screen is only 120"), but iTunes movies look great on it ...

Also, despite all the doomsday prophecies, not a single movie has been removed from my library (out of several hundred). However, I have gained around 100 free 4K upgrades. Try that with your discs. :p
Me too Rigby. I own 140 iTunes films and 26 are 4K Dolby Vision and some have Atmos too :) :) :) Sadly, none of my all time favourite films fall into the 26 however, they do look pretty great in HD.
- - Post merged: - -

Most of the studios are using Movies Anywhere, so if you redeem through MA, just link your iTunes to it and it'll show up in your iTunes library. Not sure if it will redeem in 4K, though.
MA ONLY in the USA buddy. This is a worldwide site/forum :)
 
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topcat001

macrumors regular
Nov 17, 2019
144
59
On my home theatre system with a 100" projection screen and a rather elaborate audio setup, there is a noticeable difference in quality between streaming and blu ray. Complex scenes render much better on blu ray, for example. Streaming always seems to fall apart, even on a fast connection. Also, audio is night and day.

I stream a lot of stuff, but it is not close to physical blu ray discs on the right equipment.
 

dazz87

macrumors 65816
Sep 24, 2007
1,380
1,400
On my home theatre system with a 100" projection screen and a rather elaborate audio setup, there is a noticeable difference in quality between streaming and blu ray. Complex scenes render much better on blu ray, for example. Streaming always seems to fall apart, even on a fast connection. Also, audio is night and day.

I stream a lot of stuff, but it is not close to physical blu ray discs on the right equipment.
Same here on my 120" screen its easy to notice high quailty disc (or rip) vs. Itunes or any of those streaming apps playing the same movie....People who don't see the difference between streaming and disc either have small screen or they are sitting too far from their screen. Im about 9 feet from my "120.
 

Rigby

macrumors 601
Aug 5, 2008
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San Jose, CA
Most of the studios are using Movies Anywhere, so if you redeem through MA, just link your iTunes to it and it'll show up in your iTunes library. Not sure if it will redeem in 4K, though.
Only movies that you have purchased or redeemed directly in iTunes get the free 4K upgrades.
- - Post merged: - -

On my home theatre system with a 100" projection screen and a rather elaborate audio setup, there is a noticeable difference in quality between streaming and blu ray. Complex scenes render much better on blu ray, for example. Streaming always seems to fall apart, even on a fast connection. Also, audio is night and day.
Well, I disagree. I have a hard time telling iTunes 4K movies from Blu-ray, except of course the HDR where applicable (although my projector doesn't have the brightness and contrast to represent HDR fully, like most projectors that cost less than a new Mercedes). iTunes HD is easier, but it depends a lot on the movie. Modern movies that are shot digitally and have little or no grain/noise look great, heavy grain is harder to compress and makes the difference more obvious. But it still looks good to me, and that's what counts. I'm not counting pixels while watching a movie.

And no, the audio difference is not "night and day". Try doing a blind test with level matching, you will be surprised.
 
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YaBe

Cancelled
Oct 5, 2017
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And no, the audio difference is not "night and day". Try doing a blind test with level matching, you will be surprised.
Just because some do not hear it does not mean no one does

For some, it is night and day.

EDIT:
I used to listen to MP3 and CDs, then bought a high def dap, and with the right can, you can definitely hear the difference.

Of course, you cannot if you are commuting in a metro with noise and all, but if you take your time to listen to your music you can hear the difference quite well.

I guess it depends on equipment first, the way you listen to your music (are you paying attention or is it background music?) and of course the music you hear and of course your age, as the older you get the lesser you hear it (trained hears can hear better than non trained hears as well).

The file as well makes a huge diff, not all FLAC (DSD/DSF) are equal ;)

And no you do not have to spend a fortune to hear the difference.
 
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BODYBUILDERPAUL

macrumors 68000
Feb 9, 2009
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Just because some do not hear it does not mean no one does

For some, it is night and day.

EDIT:
I used to listen to MP3 and CDs, then bought a high def dap, and with the right can, you can definitely hear the difference.

Of course, you cannot if you are commuting in a metro with noise and all, but if you take your time to listen to your music you can hear the difference quite well.

I guess it depends on equipment first, the way you listen to your music (are you paying attention or is it background music?) and of course the music you hear and of course your age, as the older you get the lesser you hear it (trained hears can hear better than non trained hears as well).

The file as well makes a huge diff, not all FLAC (DSD/DSF) are equal ;)

And no you do not have to spend a fortune to hear the difference.
Some great points. Don't forget in reality, when it comes to audio/music, it's really how the recording studio masters the final product. Some sound fantastic and some sound horrific. I've heard 128kbps AAC that sounds alive and some WAV that sound damn awful.

When it comes to film, purists must realise that their 4K BluRay discs are heavily heavily heavily compressed products at 100mbps. The original 4K file is a minimum of 2500mbps. It rather pales the 100mbps disc doesn't it! The higher bitrate of discs copied argument is quite laughable in reality. Sadly, one ignorant person talks bitrates and the rest simply follow. It's the quality of the compression techniques that counts!

Long term, I trust Apple to make a far better job of compression sizing and quality.

In reality, the disc buyers are last century's customers and are a traditional/dinosaur type of human. It's impossible getting them to reason with new experiences and something out of their comfort zone. It's like trying to explain that the world is a connected place to a Brexit voting person.
IMO, lets the disc lovers revel in their archaic system.
But, it's pointless arguing about it.
Let's all agree to move on. I embrace the future as much as possible and even year, I'm truly excited about it!!! I see huge positivities and possibilities ahead.
 

YaBe

Cancelled
Oct 5, 2017
867
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Some great points. Don't forget in reality, when it comes to audio/music, it's really how the recording studio masters the final product. Some sound fantastic and some sound horrific. I've heard 128kbps AAC that sounds alive and some WAV that sound damn awful.

When it comes to film, purists must realise that their 4K BluRay discs are heavily heavily heavily compressed products at 100mbps. The original 4K file is a minimum of 2500mbps. It rather pales the 100mbps disc doesn't it! The higher bitrate of discs copied argument is quite laughable in reality. Sadly, one ignorant person talks bitrates and the rest simply follow. It's the quality of the compression techniques that counts!

Long term, I trust Apple to make a far better job of compression sizing and quality.

In reality, the disc buyers are last century's customers and are a traditional/dinosaur type of human. It's impossible getting them to reason with new experiences and something out of their comfort zone. It's like trying to explain that the world is a connected place to a Brexit voting person.
IMO, lets the disc lovers revel in their archaic system.
But, it's pointless arguing about it.
Let's all agree to move on. I embrace the future as much as possible and even year, I'm truly excited about it!!! I see huge positivities and possibilities ahead.
Sure, how it was / is recorded makes a hell of a difference, and nowadays Artists do not pay as much attention to quality recording knowing that most of the people will use compressed audio anyway, so what's the point.

Also back in the days you did not have the chance of "fixing" stuff in post-production so the recording was handled a lot more carefully.

I am not saying I use a good dap every day or with every song, but the difference is there if you know what and how to listen.

Also, most of the time the practical side of things gets in the way, it's a lot easier to plug in BT headphones and use your cellphone with downloaded compressed mp3, and there's nothing wrong with that / not like you do not enjoy the music anyway, but saying you cannot hear the difference is another thing.

It's not for everyone, nor probably it should, I just love the clarity, the soundstage and the complete silence in silent pieces of the song, the music is a lot more "in your face".

I agree with you, I am too "truly excited about it!!! I see huge positivities and possibilities ahead", things are improving at a huge rate, the sound quality of vinyl is nowadays in a small compact mp3 like player wich is phenomenal, wireless headphones are getting better by the day, cannot wait for the next decade of "evolution".
 
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Rigby

macrumors 601
Aug 5, 2008
4,911
3,860
San Jose, CA
Just because some do not hear it does not mean no one does

For some, it is night and day.
If you don't use a methodology that eliminates placebo effects and level differences, you don't know if there is a real "night and day" difference or if your mind is playing tricks on you. From my experience most people who proclaim to hear huge differences don't really know what compression artifacts sound like.
 

faust

macrumors 6502
Sep 11, 2007
319
119
Los Angeles, CA
I still buy them. I don't have much faith in cloud based solutions. I've read way too many news articles about a tech company shutting down service and making the purchases you made on it inaccessible as a result. I've seen news that Apple customers who bought 4K UHD content off it's store later had them downgraded to 1080p without warning or good reason. Media as a Service and Software as a Service is cancer and I will not indulge in it when it comes to buying movies, music, and so on. I mean, heck, I actually just bought a very cool cassette tape of a local band's latest EP, so that's where I'm at right now.