All iPads Do you want a convertible form factor iPad?

Slate or convertible? (vote more than once, if applicable)

  • As an 12.9” ipad user, slate.

    Votes: 8 33.3%
  • As an 12.9” ipad user, convertible.

    Votes: 4 16.7%
  • As an 11” or 10.5” ipad user, slate.

    Votes: 13 54.2%
  • As an 11” or 10.5” ipad user, convertible.

    Votes: 2 8.3%
  • Not sure

    Votes: 1 4.2%
  • Other (leave comment)

    Votes: 2 8.3%

  • Total voters
    24

subjonas

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With recent news of Google axing the slate form factor in favor of their convertibles, it got me to wondering what people thought about the benefits of the slate vs convertible form factors.

Slates are the obvious choice for smaller touch screens—the mini and maybe 9.7”—because they’re kind of too small for keyboards anyway. But when the device is big enough to add a keyboard (I know the old 9.7” pro had a smart keyboard but I’m ignoring that because both are no longer sold), I think the choice between slate+keyboard cover and convertible isn’t as obvious. The benefit of a slate is that it is the lightest possible form factor when using the device as a “traditional tablet” (no keyboard). The downside is that when you do add a keyboard (in my case, the original smart keyboard) you have this thing that flops around, can be a cumbersome to fold and unfold, only has one screen angle for typing, and make the screen top heavy. I haven’t used the smart folio keyboard, but it looks to be a bit better as far as folding/unfolding (but still not as easy as simply tilting up a screen). The two angles is better than one (but not as good as infinite). Downside of the folio (compared to smart keyboard) is that it looks to be a little more effort to detach the keyboard, and the back cover adds weight. As far as total weight between slates and convertibles, I think including keyboards it’s pretty much a wash (convertibles could even be slightly lighter when comparing to the folio keyboard).

Of course, whether a slate or convertible is a better form factor for an individual will depend on a few factors:
- how much one uses the ipad in “traditional tablet” mode vs “laptop” mode. Some might not use keyboards at all. (11” users generally probably use theirs in tablet mode more than 12.9” users, hence the two sets of poll questions)
- how much one actually ends up detaching/re-attaching the keyboard (this might also differ between 11” and 12.9” users)
- different tolerances of individuals
Maybe more factors that I’m not thinking of.

As for myself, I probably use my 12.9 (with original smart keyboard) in laptop mode a bit more often than tablet mode. But I don’t often completely detach the keyboard even in tablet mode. And I suppose I am pretty intolerant, as I find the smart keyboard very cumbersome to handle. So for me, I would definitely prefer a convertible (not that I think Apple will make one). I’m sure I’m in the minority, but curious to see if there are others.

Please feel free to vote and leave your thoughts.
 

Abazigal

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Jul 18, 2011
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I am currently happy with my current setup comprising of the 2018 11” iPad Pro and Smart Keyboard.

I find that I do detach my ipad from my keyboard pretty often, and like that the design of the Smart Keyboard makes it so easy and convenient to detach and attach every time. While I can fold the keyboard behind the ipad, it does add some extra bulk and weight, which I don’t always appreciate.

This is me using an iPad mini as a makeshift visualiser in my class back in 2015 (the ipad is mirrored to my Apple TV which is connected to a projector). A convertible form factor would result in the keyboard portion either sticking out or blocking the camera when folded back.

Also, when I am writing on my ipad with the Apple Pencil, I prefer the ipad to be raised at a slight incline, so what I do is detach the ipad and rest it on top of the closed Smart Keyboard.
 

Shirasaki

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May 16, 2015
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I am typing this reply using Apple Smart Keyboard Folio.

There is no clear cut for this preference but personally, I like the iPad to be a slate rather than “convertible”. One thing about “convertible” is you always carry the keyboard whether you want to use it or not. Sometimes it can quickly become a hurdle and pain to deal with. On the other hand, “slate” provide a clean look and use of the tablet, and it is generally easier to carry.

One major reason I love Apple keyboard folio is I can easily snatch it onto iPad when I need it, and take it off with minimal efforts when I don’t want. It does not have battery, meaning the profile is low, and I do not need to recharge it at all. As a folio it sadly does not provide corner protection. But now I consider this more of a trade-off as having corner protection means tearing down and setting up takes more effort. I tried Logitech keyboard folio before and liked that keyboard travel and backlight (!). However, the language switch key was way too easy to trigger and most of the time it did not work properly for some reason, while apple keyboard folio did better in this regard. One major reason I decided to burn extra cash is I had to take some time putting iPad into the case firmly, one thing I am afraid will damage iPad screen near four corners.

Back to the convertible. Surface is hardly a “convertible” computer, more like iPad with Smart Keyboard. But for other 2-in-1 computer, they look cool and can be used in interesting scenarios. I tried one before briefly and kinda liked that convertible idea, but after carrying it around I immediately realise I did not like the feeling - too thick and too heavy. Their prices are also on par with iPad or Surface Pro, some of which is slightly cheaper. Another factor of “convertible” is people tend to use any sort of touch control with it. The iPad, being heavily optimised for touch control, definitely wins comparison against other convertibles hands down.

In summary, convertible does not really bring extra benefit in terms of typing or general use, and keyboard could impact device portability in a bad way. That “infinite angle” is good but this can be achieved with other methods.

For that infinite angle thing, I feel bad that I could not buy Brydge Smart Keyboard in Australia locally, otherwise I might give it a shot.
 

Mr.Blacky

macrumors 6502
Jul 31, 2016
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Why should I buy an iPad and don't use it as a tablet? Makes zero sense.o_O Also, I bet, most people who use a convertible, are using it as a laptop 99% of the time.
 
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AutomaticApple

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This is me using an iPad mini as a makeshift visualiser in my class back in 2015 (the ipad is mirrored to my Apple TV which is connected to a projector). A convertible form factor would result in the keyboard portion either sticking out or blocking the camera when folded back.
I did something similar many years ago.
 

subjonas

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I am currently happy with my current setup comprising of the 2018 11” iPad Pro and Smart Keyboard.

I find that I do detach my ipad from my keyboard pretty often, and like that the design of the Smart Keyboard makes it so easy and convenient to detach and attach every time. While I can fold the keyboard behind the ipad, it does add some extra bulk and weight, which I don’t always appreciate.

This is me using an iPad mini as a makeshift visualiser in my class back in 2015 (the ipad is mirrored to my Apple TV which is connected to a projector). A convertible form factor would result in the keyboard portion either sticking out or blocking the camera when folded back.

Also, when I am writing on my ipad with the Apple Pencil, I prefer the ipad to be raised at a slight incline, so what I do is detach the ipad and rest it on top of the closed Smart Keyboard.
Wow that’s a cool setup! Slates are definitely more versatile for a scenario like this. (Though I wonder if any convertibles have “rear facing” cameras on the keyboard.)

I do hear you about the added weight and bulk of the keyboard. Personally, I’m usually ok with it, but I’d imagine most people probably prefer taking it off. But also I think a lot of people don’t realize a convertible would be a bit thinner overall, so the difference without the keyboard wouldn’t be as pronounced. And my thinking is that when a solid keyboard is folded back with a solid hinge and stays in place (doesn’t flex or flop around), its presence won’t be noticed as much. I haven’t used a convertible long enough to confirm that, so that part is theory. It would be great to get some input from people who have extensively used/owned both. But again, I’m sure most still prefer slate.

I am typing this reply using Apple Smart Keyboard Folio.

There is no clear cut for this preference but personally, I like the iPad to be a slate rather than “convertible”. One thing about “convertible” is you always carry the keyboard whether you want to use it or not. Sometimes it can quickly become a hurdle and pain to deal with. On the other hand, “slate” provide a clean look and use of the tablet, and it is generally easier to carry.
Slate without a keyboard is definitely lighter and thinner. I’m sure most are like you and enjoy the ipad as a slate. And while I agree that a keyboard cover is a hurdle and pain, I’d disagree if you also meant that a convertible’s keyboard is a hurdle and pain. It’s pretty easy to flip it back out of the way (about as easy as detaching a keyboard anyway), no origami folding—and once it’s out of the way, it stays there (doesn’t flex or flop around). It’s just the extra weight and thickness that is the compromise. If you’re carrying your tablet around, that almost one pound or so is definitely a significant weight difference. But for me, I almost never hold my 12.9 without resting it on a surface anyway, so to me that extra weight is a smaller sacrifice. As far as the thickness, again that’s something I wouldn’t mind personally. But also (as I mentioned above to the other user), I think some people might be thinking a convertible would be same the thickness as the ipp+ASK (or maybe even thicker?) when actually if you look at the comparably sized pixelbook, it’s about 3.5mm thinner in total. So shedding the keyboard may not make as big of a difference as some think, though it would make some difference of course.

Back to the convertible. Surface is hardly a “convertible” computer, more like iPad with Smart Keyboard. But for other 2-in-1 computer, they look cool and can be used in interesting scenarios. I tried one before briefly and kinda liked that convertible idea, but after carrying it around I immediately realise I did not like the feeling - too thick and too heavy. Their prices are also on par with iPad or Surface Pro, some of which is slightly cheaper. Another factor of “convertible” is people tend to use any sort of touch control with it. The iPad, being heavily optimised for touch control, definitely wins comparison against other convertibles hands down.
Just want to be clear, I don’t mean “convertible” in any software sense, if that’s what you mean. I only mean a change in the hardware form factor.

In summary, convertible does not really bring extra benefit in terms of typing or general use, and keyboard could impact device portability in a bad way. That “infinite angle” is good but this can be achieved with other methods.

For that infinite angle thing, I feel bad that I could not buy Brydge Smart Keyboard in Australia locally, otherwise I might give it a shot.
I think convertible keyboard typing is generally better than keyboard cover typing, but that’s a minor reason for me. Not sure exactly what you mean by general usage, but since I am annoyed daily dealing with my ASK, I’d say a convertible would help me in general usage. But yeah, like everything, it has its own compromises, and it’s not for everyone. And I definitely don’t think Apple would actually make an ipad convertible. That would be admitting that the ipad is not a traditional tablet-first device. As long as the keyboard is detachable, they have deniability haha.

The only thing with those 3rd party keyboard solutions is they add a bit more weight and bulk. And I think you have to charge it. But that’s certainly a reasonable compromise for some.

Why should I buy an iPad and don't use it as a tablet? Makes zero sense.o_O
I don’t think we’re understanding each other.

Also, I bet, most people who use a convertible, are using it as a laptop 99% of the time.
Who knows. But of course, yes, the more you use it with the keyboard, the more a convertible makes sense, and vice versa. Also, the larger the device, the more it is probably used with the keyboard. I was actually surprised that the 10.5”/11” convertible already got votes. I was half expecting none at all.
 

Shirasaki

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May 16, 2015
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Just want to be clear, I don’t mean “convertible” in any software sense, if that’s what you mean. I only mean a change in the hardware form factor.
Yes. I do mean hardware form factor. The reason I say that is majority of those convertible PCs tend to have a touch screen built in, creating incentives for people to use it a bit.
I think some people might be thinking a convertible would be same the thickness as the ipp+ASK (or maybe even thicker?) when actually if you look at the comparably sized pixelbook, it’s about 3.5mm thinner in total.
I haven’t used pixelbook before nor see someone using it. But I guess the overall feeling would be similar to what I see on iPad Pro 11” with ASK.
Ok. After a quick search, it looks like pixelbook is gearing towards more on laptop side than tablet, whereas iPad is first a tablet, then it becomes a pseudo laptop device. I think this is one major design difference between each device.
But for me, I almost never hold my 12.9 without resting it on a surface anyway, so to me that extra weight is a smaller sacrifice.
I have 11” iPad Pro and I tend to carry it around and use it on the bed. If I get 12.9”, I would not be able to type anything on landscape mode without stretching my thumb too much. But if I use iPad like you, then I agree that extra weight is much less of a problem.
 
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Abazigal

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It wasn’t until last year that I got the Smart Keyboard with my iPad Pro. Previously, I got by with the iPad itself just fine. I think most people don’t use Bluetooth keyboards with their iPads and for them, a convertible would just represent added bulk and cost.
 

subjonas

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Ok. After a quick search, it looks like pixelbook is gearing towards more on laptop side than tablet, whereas iPad is first a tablet, then it becomes a pseudo laptop device. I think this is one major design difference between each device.
I’m not too familiar with the pixelbook software myself. I’ve only seen the hardware. But yeah, the convertible form factor is geared toward people who use the keyboard a lot, probably a lot more with it than without it.
I actually use it about half and half, but the reason I would prefer convertible is because, like I mentioned, even when I don’t use the keyboard, I don’t often detach it. But when I do detach, I think the reason is less about the weight and more that I just don’t want it flopping around. Also it feels kind of cheap and flimsy when folded behind. And a lot of the reason I don’t detach it is that I just don’t want it lying around (taking up table space, have to remember to pick it up, etc). All those things wouldn’t be the case with a convertible, which is why a convertible would make sense for me.

It wasn’t until last year that I got the Smart Keyboard with my iPad Pro. Previously, I got by with the iPad itself just fine. I think most people don’t use Bluetooth keyboards with their iPads and for them, a convertible would just represent added bulk and cost.
Oh for sure a convertible wouldn’t make much sense for most iPad owners, especially the <12.9” owners since they probably use their devices holding them more. I’m in no way trying to convince anyone otherwise. I’m just saying convertible form factor makes sense for a (probably small) subset of users such as myself. Just curious to see what the extent of that subset actually is, at least as far as MR users.
 

Mainsail

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I have an ASK and I keep changing back and forth between using my iPad with and without it. On one hand, it is convenient to always have a keyboard when you need to do a lot of typing. On the other hand, if I frequently do large volumes of typing, then why not just use a laptop with a full keyboard and trackpad? Why own an iPad if you are often using it in the laptop configuration?

One option is to simply use your iPad with a full sized separate BT keyboard, mouse (iPadOS), and Monitor when at home or office, and only use the iPad as a slate when mobile. In a pinch, you could bring along the BT keyboard if you knew there was going to be a lot of typing away from your desk.......but, that would be the exception. Finally, slate mode is great with an Apple Pencil when going to meetings for taking notes, annotating documents/presentations, making sketches, and diagraming problems. Personally, I don’t find the Apple Pencil nearly as useful when the iPad is propped up in laptop mode.
 

subjonas

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On the other hand, if I frequently do large volumes of typing, then why not just use a laptop with a full keyboard and trackpad? Why own an iPad if you are often using it in the laptop configuration?
That is a legit question. For me, I draw for work so I have to use an iPad for the pencil (touch input is not really important to me), because MacBooks don’t have pencil input (and 360 hinge). The “laptop” functionality of the iPad is actually somewhat secondary for me, but I do end up using it in that config very often because a lot of my general productivity involves a lot of text input. And I also use the keyboard stand when just consuming on the iPad, if I’m sitting at a desk/table.
If there was some way to input text in tablet mode that was as good as a physical keyboard (laptop mode), then I would keep it in tablet mode all the time and not ever need a physical keyboard. But for me, physical keyboards are just too much better—at least twice as fast than typing on a touch screen, with far less mistakes, and it doesn’t take up half the screen.
I suppose carrying both a 12.9 iPP and macbook would be ideal except for the obvious issue of weight—it would be twice as heavy, and my shoulder bag that I carry every day is already at the limit I want to tolerate.

One option is to simply use your iPad with a full sized separate BT keyboard, mouse (iPadOS), and Monitor when at home or office, and only use the iPad as a slate when mobile. In a pinch, you could bring along the BT keyboard if you knew there was going to be a lot of typing away from your desk.......but, that would be the exception.
The thing is, that exception happens all the time every day. I carry it in my shoulder bag every day to/from work, where I use it in tandem with my work Mac, for both drawing and text input. And I often go to cafes, etc. to work as well.

Finally, slate mode is great with an Apple Pencil when going to meetings for taking notes, annotating documents/presentations, making sketches, and diagraming problems. Personally, I don’t find the Apple Pencil nearly as useful when the iPad is propped up in laptop mode.
Yeah, I only use the pencil when the keyboard cover is folded back or removed.
 

Greenmeenie

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Having a convertible ipad is not high on my list of future ipad features. I won’t go near such an ipad until the technology is perfected. Until then, it’s just a gimmick to me. My ipad pro has replaced my laptop. I use it for everything. Including content creation while on the road. Photo & video editing as well as drawing. If any of those abilities were compromised in a folding ipad, it would not be worth it for me. The ipad is already small enough for travel. I have the 11” ipad pro & the ipad mini 5, so i have all sizes i need covered. Plus theres always the iphone. To me a folding ipad is more of a novelty than a necessity.
 

subjonas

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Having a convertible ipad is not high on my list of future ipad features. I won’t go near such an ipad until the technology is perfected. Until then, it’s just a gimmick to me. My ipad pro has replaced my laptop. I use it for everything. Including content creation while on the road. Photo & video editing as well as drawing. If any of those abilities were compromised in a folding ipad, it would not be worth it for me. The ipad is already small enough for travel. I have the 11” ipad pro & the ipad mini 5, so i have all sizes i need covered. Plus theres always the iphone. To me a folding ipad is more of a novelty than a necessity.
Just curious, what do you mean by perfected?
 

sonicrobby

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If Apple can do it right, 100% convertible. Im all in favor for having one device, one charger; and right now, iPad is my preferred device. The phone I need to have because I basically need it for, well phoning... Everything else I do on my iPad. To have a single device that can both conveniently handle as a phone, but provide the screen real estate of an iPad Mini AND easily fit into my pockets. Why the hell not?! :D
 

Greenmeenie

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Just curious, what do you mean by perfected?
It just seems that the first attempts at a folding phone/tablet were unsuccessful & now google is abandoning theirs. That kind lf perfected. I think the technology has a long way to go before such a device can function seamlessly.

And like I wrote about, for me personally, even if they do improve foldable devices, i don’t really think i will have a desire for one. As an artist who travels a lot, my 11” ipad pro is portable enough. I don’t care about a foldable device...especially if it will compromise quality. Still, i love technology & reading about new stuff. A foldable ipad just doesn’t excite me.
 

subjonas

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If Apple can do it right, 100% convertible. Im all in favor for having one device, one charger; and right now, iPad is my preferred device. The phone I need to have because I basically need it for, well phoning... Everything else I do on my iPad. To have a single device that can both conveniently handle as a phone, but provide the screen real estate of an iPad Mini AND easily fit into my pockets. Why the hell not?! :D
It just seems that the first attempts at a folding phone/tablet were unsuccessful & now google is abandoning theirs. That kind lf perfected. I think the technology has a long way to go before such a device can function seamlessly.

And like I wrote about, for me personally, even if they do improve foldable devices, i don’t really think i will have a desire for one. As an artist who travels a lot, my 11” ipad pro is portable enough. I don’t care about a foldable device...especially if it will compromise quality. Still, i love technology & reading about new stuff. A foldable ipad just doesn’t excite me.
Huh? There seems to be some miscommunication. By convertible, I meant a “laptop” form factor than converts into “tablet” form factor (ie. keyboard base, thin display, with a 360 hinge). I thought that was evident in my post and throughout this thread, no? And isn’t that the prevailing definition for that term “convertible”? Do people use it to mean a folding screen device too?
 

Greenmeenie

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Huh? There seems to be some miscommunication. By convertible, I meant a “laptop” form factor than converts into “tablet” form factor (ie. keyboard base, thin display, with a 360 hinge). I thought that was evident in my post and throughout this thread, no? And isn’t that the prevailing definition for that term “convertible”? Do people use it to mean a folding screen device too?
Yeah, i thought convertible was referring to a foldable screen for some reason. My bad. But actually funny enough, I do feel the same way about convertibles & foldable devices. Since ditching my laptop for an ipad pro, i haven’t looked back. Although i do a lot of art, photography & video editing on it, i also do a lot of typing. And oddly enough, i don’t even use the Apple smart keyboard with my ipad. I much prefer typing on the screen using the virtual keyboard. I have become quite a fast typist using the virtual keyboard. So much so that going back to a physical keyboard feels weird to me. In the same way that when i use a laptop now, i keep trying to touch the screen. It has just become second nature to me.

So yeah, a convertible detachable keyboard style ipad doesn’t interest me at all. Just adds bulk. Don’t need it. Don’t want it. Kinda defeats the purpose of an ipad imho. But i can see where others disagree, and would want a detachable keyboard. I’m just not one of them. I like the simplicity & purity of a touch only device when it comes to ipads. But thats me.
 

Mainsail

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Yeah, i thought convertible was referring to a foldable screen for some reason. My bad. But actually funny enough, I do feel the same way about convertibles & foldable devices. Since ditching my laptop for an ipad pro, i haven’t looked back. Although i do a lot of art, photography & video editing on it, i also do a lot of typing. And oddly enough, i don’t even use the Apple smart keyboard with my ipad. I much prefer typing on the screen using the virtual keyboard. I have become quite a fast typist using the virtual keyboard. So much so that going back to a physical keyboard feels weird to me. In the same way that when i use a laptop now, i keep trying to touch the screen. It has just become second nature to me.

So yeah, a convertible detachable keyboard style ipad doesn’t interest me at all. Just adds bulk. Don’t need it. Don’t want it. Kinda defeats the purpose of an ipad imho. But i can see where others disagree, and would want a detachable keyboard. I’m just not one of them. I like the simplicity & purity of a touch only device when it comes to ipads. But thats me.
It sounds like you have replaced your laptop with a true tablet experience without keyboard. Do you have a desktop for those occasions when you need to do significant typing or work on lengthy documents?

My wife is one of these people that hates laptops. She uses a desktop Mac for more complex tasks and uses her iPad in pure tablet mode for everything else. It works for her.

When I look at the new gestures and text selection features in iPadOS, it seems like Apple is still very committed to the iPad as a touch first device. However, they are also adding more keyboard shortcuts, so Apple is certainly willing to continue selling us expensive smart keyboards if we are willing to pay for one.....which I did. :) That said: I do find the process of moving my hands from a horizontal surface (keyboard) to a vertical surface (screen) to be somewhat unnatural and uncomfortable.
 
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sracer

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Why should I buy an iPad and don't use it as a tablet? Makes zero sense.o_O
No one is telling you to buy an iPad and not use it as a tablet.

As for why OTHER people do, there are a few reasons... an iPad (Pro or non) with a keyboard cover is thinner and lighter than a laptop of comparable price. iOS is more stable (stable as in, not constantly being updated) than desktop OSes. Certain workflows are more streamlined on iOS devices than on a traditional desktop. Battery life is generall better on tablets.


Also, I bet, most people who use a convertible, are using it as a laptop 99% of the time.
You would lose that bet. ;)
 
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rowspaxe

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I don't get why so many MR posters are so hostile to the concept of tablet/laptop
hybrid. And also don't get why so many insist the bar for "hybridity" be full pc functionality.
Some consumers like blended functionality and are willing to make compromises.
Tim Cook's 'toaster-refrigerator' binary thinking is bs: let the market speak
 
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bensisko

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Convertibles are completely horrid for what I personally use an iPad for, especially in the area of drawing / note taking. If the iPad went the "convertible" route (and I sincerely doubt they would), it would be useless to me and I would see alternate options.

It's kind of funny - early on, back when Microsoft was trying to drive Tablet form factor growth in the early 2000s, they tried to get manufacturers to make tablets and they made laptops with touchscreens. One of the drivers for the Surface was OEMs not making the device Microsoft wanted them to make.

No, I think the correct route is to make the tablet with an attachable keyboard (like the iPad and the keyboard folio, the Surface Pro and Surface Book). That way people can use it as a tablet when/if they want and a laptop when they want.
 
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seadragon

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I don't get why so many MR posters are so hostile to the concept of tablet/laptop
hybrid. And also don't get why so many insist the bar for "hybridity" be full pc functionality.
Some consumers like blended functionality and are willing to make compromises.
Tim Cook's 'toaster-refrigerator' binary thinking is bs: let the market speak
Well said. I don’t understand the hostility either. To me, the more a device can do and the more flexible it is, the better. Personally, I use my iPad Pro as my computer almost exclusively now. With iPad OS, mouse support, and external storage, things just got better IMO. The future is bright!
 
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bensisko

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Well said. I don’t understand the hostility either. To me, the more a device can do and the more flexible it is, the better. Personally, I use my iPad Pro as my computer almost exclusively now. With iPad OS, mouse support, and external storage, things just got better IMO. The future is bright!
It seems to me, though, a "convertible" would limit functionality rather than expand it (assuming we're only talking about the "fold-over" types and are not counting a tablet with an attachable keyboard as a "convertible").

I guess it really depends on your viewpoint from a use perspective. If you use your device in laptop mode 80% of the time, then a fold-over might be the functionality you're looking for. If you use your device in tablet mode 80% of the time, a fold-over probably isn't going to do it for you. Obviously there are exceptions both ways.

As I mentioned - to me a keyboard (in any non-digital form) is just added bulk (as is a case) and not something I find valuable to carry around. I can see the other side of the use case and all of those in-between - which is why I really like the Surface lineup (and I could totally see situations in which I would use each and every device... which is a wallet problem [either for buying all those devices, or going to a therapist for tech addiction])
  • Surface Go - For Mobile Use
  • Surface Pro - For Tablet Primary/Focus
  • Surface Laptop - For laptop primary/focus
  • Surface Book - Laptop for Performance and Tablet for tablet use
  • Surface Studio - Desktop with pen capabilites
  • Surface Hub - For Collaboration Focus
In Apple's lineup, I would much rather have Apple make the Macbook Pro with a touchscreen than have a "convertible" iPad. That's just me though, and I think that makes sense.
I can see, though, where Apple has a potential gap for a new product category.
 

rowspaxe

macrumors 68020
Jan 29, 2010
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In Apple's lineup, I would much rather have Apple make the Macbook Pro with a touchscreen than have a "convertible" iPad. That's just me though, and I think that makes sense.
How would you draw on a touchscreen macbook. art and notes drove the surface line and the introduction of
new form factors