Double Albums

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by AustinIllini, Dec 6, 2013.

  1. AustinIllini macrumors demi-god

    AustinIllini

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    #1
    In a recent interview, Noel Gallagher, creative center of Oasis, made the following comment regarding double albums:

    Now, I know it is true that most double albums are horse manure or single albums with extra fat, but there are certainly some very good ones. What are your favorite and least favorite double albums?

    Best:
    Exile on Main Street
    The Beatles
    The Wall
    Physical Graffiti

    Worst:
    Stadium Arcadium
     
  2. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

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    #2
    Noel just needs to shut up and make another High Flying Birds album - the debut album is one of my favorites (no, it's not double).

    Off the top of my head, I can't even think of a favorite or least favorite double album. All my music's digital, so without the need to switch CDs in the middle, a double album is just like one long album to me. Digital just may be the death of the double album.
     
  3. rrl macrumors 6502

    rrl

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    #3
    And:

    Tommy
    Quadrophenia
    London Calling
    Decade
    The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway

    ...
     
  4. roadbloc macrumors G3

    roadbloc

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    #4
    I don't mind double albums, but I sort of agree with him to be honest. I listen to each disc as a different album, because I never really play them together in succession.

    But yeah, Noel needs to shut up, get back into the studio and start making his crappy music for that Blur band he's in.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #5
    It really depends on the actual double album, and whether what you have to say can be compressed into a single album or not. To be honest, with the development of the CD, (with the possibility of being able to listen to 80 minutes of music on one device - a standard set to be able to include Ludwig van Beethoven's Ninth Symphony on one disc), such discussions and debates became somewhat moot.

    In any case some double albums, such as the outstanding 'White' album of the Beatles' require the space afforded by the double album format in order to realise its artistic potential fully. (Indeed, on that very topic, I seem to recall reading that 'Sgt Pepper's' had originally been conceived, or was initially envisaged, as a double-album - the stunning artwork alone would seem to indicate that this might have been a vague possibility at some stage, but shocked reality, in the form of studio executives horrified at the escalating costs, decided to curtail this grand vision. I have long felt that Sgt Pepper's is a sort of double album manqué; it reminds me of those glorious capital cities one sees in countries shorn of their empires…..amazing, but somehow lacking the sort of hinterland required to sustain this grand vision.)

    Granted, there were a lot of self-indulgent and bloated musical offerings in the 1970s, some of which were released in the form of double albums, but, so what? Most of what is forgettable has been forgotten, and, at the very least, we could rest assured that however self-indulgent the music, it was written by those who performed it, an assurance I would not be able to offer with the same degree of certainty today. Moreover, some great music was written then.

    And, Noel, seriously: How many kids today even know what an album - let alone the artistic extravagance called the double album - actually is? It has gone the way of the dodo, and the CD……

    Noel, this is a dialogue with those who actually care about what music means, those who agonised over lyrics, who debated melody, and who saw significance in the (often articulate and occasionally very brave) public and political stances taken by some musicians. To be frank, Noel, I am not sure that this is a dialogue that it is possible to have with many of the music-downloading demographic these days. Tempus fugit, and all that.
     
  6. mobilehaathi macrumors G3

    mobilehaathi

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    #6
    So that's it, eh? Even 45 min of attention is too much to ask?

    MR needs an 'exasperated' emoticon....
     
  7. AustinIllini thread starter macrumors demi-god

    AustinIllini

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    #7
    These days, albums are more like a collection of songs, but the best double albums are really closer to concept albums. I miss good concept albums. As much as I like Arcade Fire, "Reflektor" is not a great double album.

    ----------

    Also, 45 minutes seems like a really short double album.
     
  8. mobilehaathi macrumors G3

    mobilehaathi

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    #8
    I think his point was that, in his opinion, even a 45 min single album is 'too long' for audiences in 2013. This strikes me as either a rather cynical view of modern audiences or a disturbing observation or both. In any event that quote makes me feel as if that artist is more concerned with the marketability of music rather than the artistry of it...
     
  9. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

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    #9
    He is correct, at least when it comes to his music. I struggle to sit and listen through the 4 minutes of on track.
     
  10. Jessica Lares macrumors G3

    Jessica Lares

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    #10
    Oh man, if you don't know who Noel Gallagher is, just watch ANY interview he's ever done. There's a reason why this guy is always being interviewed, even when the guy hasn't been on tour since about February now. His tour blogs were fantastic too - They rarely had anything to do with touring and were more of rants.

    I really want another HFB album too, I still play the first constantly (and all Oasis albums at that - Diehard fan), and enjoyed his show here in Texas last year.

    I have to agree with him. And I know it from experience because I have lent my mom some of my albums in the past, and she'll immediately go to the two or three songs she likes, and then not listen to the rest. A lot of people don't care to listen to a whole album out of pure ignorance, or because it's probably going to be shoved on the radio and played to death anyway, so they might as well wait. People don't value music as much as they used to.

    Stadium Arcadium is the only double album I know of. I wasn't buying music full on until 2003. I agree, I didn't really care for it, except for the singles, and even then, it should have ended by the third one, the two others weren't worth the release.

    Is Green Day's latest offering of basically three albums the same thing? I think the three separate releases worked better anyway.

    Reflektor's songs seem a bit long too. If anyone knows anything about that, it would be Noel, considering "Be Here Now" suffered from the same problem. You can be the biggest band in the world, but most people are tired by 5 minutes of a song, especially the mainstream market.
     
  11. samiwas macrumors 65816

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    #11
    Hell, then you'd hate my music!! :D
     
  12. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

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    #12
    I liked the very first Oasis album...
     
  13. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    #13
    Most double albums I like are either live versions or compilations.

    I thought The Beatles, while certainly an outstanding album, contained a certain amount of "filler" that might not have been included on any single album by the Beatles.

    Some of the individual songs from The Wall don't make much of an impression on me, but taken collectively are an integral part of the story and as a whole, the album is one of my favorites.
     
  14. AustinIllini thread starter macrumors demi-god

    AustinIllini

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    #14
    This statement is as controversial as it is true. Personally, I'm inclined to agree with you. The Beatles is an all-time great single album if you cut out the fat (Revolution 9 is unforgivably bad).
     
  15. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    #15
    I thought that one, Wild Honey Pie, and Yer Blues were just "mailed in" by the guys.

    I once wondered on an old blog of mine if they had released the very best songs from the White Album as a single-length disc, how it would have been remembered.
     
  16. AustinIllini thread starter macrumors demi-god

    AustinIllini

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    #16
    The album overall is fatally flawed. Paul and John rarely performed together. It was either Paul and a backing band or John and a backing band. The genius of the Beatles was the way Paul and John complemented each other in songwriting. The absolute best albums (Revolver, Sgt. Peppers) are littered with instances of John and Paul exchanging lyrics. The White Album was void of any of that because John and Paul couldn't get along. Thankfully, for Abbey Road, the two agreed to do one last hurrah album, and you get a lot of that magic from the John/Paul collaboration.
     
  17. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #17
    I agree entirely about 'Revolution No 9' - a dreadful piece of ghastly self-indulgence, and also, 'Yer Blues', a horrible song and waste of resources and indeed, album space.

    'Honey Pie' is somewhat different: while it is by no means anywhere near my favourites (or even top 15 favourites) on the album, I can see what they are trying to do. By then, the Beatles were experimenting with somewhat older musical forms and 'Honey Pie' strikes me a something of a homage to some of the music hall songs of the 1920s.

    You are completely correct in what you write about the differences in conception and execution (and indeed, recording) between the respective albums. However, while I love both, I still prefer the 'White' album, with 'Abbey Road' coming a close second. (And Revolver coming next)..
     
  18. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #18
    Noel Gallagher doesn't have a clue about what he's talking about. He should actually concentrate on getting his own 'musical talent' better, because to be honest, it sucks.

    His band could barely play 3 chords, he could barely hold a note to save his life, and produced crappy music that never should have been popular to begin with.

    Champagne Supernova was a huge cavernous wall of noise, and Wonderwall sounded like the bleating of a sheep crossed with the belching of a cow after it had eaten grass, corn, and beans all in one sit. No intonation, no tone, and quite honestly, something that shouldn't have been sang by him. His brother sang it better live.

    Again, he should spend more time getting his life in check, especially with his brother, than slamming other artists who have made a name for themselves, and more successful than him.

    I believe Stevie Wonder's Songs in the Key of Life was a very popular double album.

    BL.
     
  19. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

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    #19
    I think you're mixing up Liam and Noel. Liam did vocals on the album version Champagne Supernova and Wonderwall, and yes, Noel does them much better live.

    Noel's always been the more talented of the two, and it's even more evident when comparing their respective solo works. Liam's solo project (Beady Eye) is, quite frankly, crap, and Noel Gallagher's (High Flying Birds) is one of the best albums I've ever listened to.
     
  20. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

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    #20
    The lyrics have more than 140 characters...too stressful to maintain concentration beyond that point.
     
  21. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #21
    Then I stand corrected. I thought that Noel sang the album versions that were released to radio. I do remember the brothers having a fight the day of their MTV: Unplugged performance, which one brother wasn't going to show up (yet, mysteriously, he was up in the balcony?!?); the show went on, with the other brother signing it, and it sounded rather decent, upstaging the brother in the balcony.

    Bottom line: whichever one sang on the album versions was just bloody awful.

    I say this not just because my children live the album, but it is well produced, but the kids singing on Thomas and Friends: Thomas' Train Yard Tracks sounds better than what came out on that entire Oasis album.

    BL.
     
  22. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    #22
    I like "Honey Pie," I was talking about "Wild Honey Pie," a different song on the same album.
     
  23. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #23
    For what music costs 45 min seems like a rip off to me. I want a good 60 mins.
     
  24. AustinIllini thread starter macrumors demi-god

    AustinIllini

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    #24
    Quality over quantity always.
     
  25. musicjunky macrumors regular

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    Sep 20, 2013
    #25
    Have to show some love for a triple album, Joanna Newsom's Have One on Me. Though each disc is only around 40 mins (it could've been stuffed into a double album, but on three disc, it becomes manageable). One of the best artists working!
     

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