Resolved Dualboot Mac/Linux

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by WhiteKnightMac, Jul 1, 2017.

  1. WhiteKnightMac macrumors newbie

    WhiteKnightMac

    Joined:
    May 21, 2017
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    #1
    Heading out to the Falklands next January and want to set-up a Dualboot system with MacOS Sierra and Linux distro KDE neon.

    The main OS will be KDE neon with the MacOS as a backup for incompatible software and AirPlay functionality.

    All media i.e. Videos and Music will be stored on an external USB 2.0 HDD.

    My question to the community is:

    What allocation to the Linux Os should I give as the main operating system while still having a functioning MacOS running a clean install?

    I don't intend on installing any additional software to the Mac side unless absolutely necessary.

    The HDD is 128GB.

    Any suggestions and reasoning welcome.
     
  2. chscag macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Location:
    Fort Worth, Texas
    #2
    Just a suggestion: Why not install Linux in a VM instead of going the dual boot route and possibly running into problems? VirtualBox from Oracle is free and will easily run most distros of Linux. VirtualBox downloads.
     
  3. WhiteKnightMac thread starter macrumors newbie

    WhiteKnightMac

    Joined:
    May 21, 2017
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    #3
    I've got a fully functioning version of Parallels 12 that I have successfully tested and run Linux in, however I'd like to run the OS nativity as to take fully advantage of the hardware.

    I'll keep the suggestion in mind though as it's a definite possibility and would save switching between the OS when software compatibility issues arise.

    My only issue with running a VM is the RAM hogging that it always seams to take. My MBA only has 4GB and running both OS's simultaneously is a real burden.
     
  4. Mikael H macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2014
    #4
    Have you tried running the system on bare metal so that you’re sure your hardware works well while in your Linux distribution? Mac hardware doesn’t have the best track record when it comes to Linux compatibility.

    Otherwise I’d say if you’re looking to run Linux, get a laptop with known good Linux support. Lenovo’s T series with Intel graphics usually work, and Dell has a couple of series specifically aimed at the Linux community; then run an iPad or iPhone for Airplay streaming.

    Dual-booting has its uses, but I personally find it better to stick to the OS that fits my actual needs for that particular computer. Everything else requires compromises I’m not prepared to make.
     
  5. WhiteKnightMac thread starter macrumors newbie

    WhiteKnightMac

    Joined:
    May 21, 2017
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    #5
    My main reasoning for installing a Linux OS was to gain some speed back from this old machine. I've done many clean installs of Mac OS Sierra but every time it seams to be running out of RAM very quickly. Running a single window in safari or playing a video through VLC and Airplay seam to max out the 4GB RAM that I have installed.

    I've looked at running either Ubuntu Gnome or KDE neon as both of these distros are well supported on the Mac hardware and the communities are very helpful.
     
  6. Fancuku macrumors 6502a

    Fancuku

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2015
    Location:
    PA, USA
    #6
    If you are not going to store any media on an external drive then I would split the Air's SSD in half, 60 for Linux and 60 for Sierra.
     
  7. WhiteKnightMac thread starter macrumors newbie

    WhiteKnightMac

    Joined:
    May 21, 2017
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    #7
    I think you're right, doing this will at least give me some wiggle room on both OS'
     
  8. Mikael H macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2014
    #8
    I suspect both of those systems may be slightly on the heavy side too, though - surely you will run modern versions of Chrome/Chromium, or Firefox on that machine too, so you won't save a lot on the browser side. So sure, go ahead and try a high-end Linux desktop, but be prepared to also try less bloated environments.
     

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