DVB-T2 compatible USB tuner

old john

macrumors member
Nov 18, 2005
94
2
England
Anyone used this USB stick from Hauppage? It is said to support Macs. Not sure it would be much good for me as I currently rely on 2 inside aerials.
I noticed this last year and on 1 August emailed Hauppage UK to ask about its use with Macs. I quoted the reply verbatim on this thread (see my post of 20 August, #7 above), which said that the USB stick was not currently supported on a Mac, but that Elgato were currently working on it.

On 4 January this year I emailed the same guy at Hauppage referring to his earlier reply and asking, "Can you give us an indication of when it's likely to appear, or failing that give us any relevant information about receiving DVB-T2 on Apple Macs."

But this time there was no reply. I assume either he was mistaken last August, or Elgato have halted or delayed the work they were doing.

The market should eventually attract companies to develop the necessary software. Consider the countries with plans to move to DVB-T2. I recommend the pages on individual countries on the DVB website.

Start at http://www.dvb.org/about_dvb/dvb_worldwide/ and select a country from the menu on the right. Search with the string T2 and scan through the various sentences and paragraphs it finds. This reveals far more than the map of DVB-T2 deployment around the world. For example, on the map France is shown as a DVB-T country, yet on the France page, there are 21 matches to a T2 search. The most relevant is:
The government has committed to using DVB-T2 in the future according to the CSA.
Michel Boyon, the president of the CSA said that there is no timetable for the launch of DVB-T2 in France but hinted that this could be at the end of 2015, beginning of 2016.
Ouch, that's some 3.5 years away! However, other countries have earlier plans for DVB-T2. For example, Russia had been planning to move the whole country to it in 2015, but has changed the year to 2013 and T2 broadcasts started in the region of Tatarstan on 1 March 2012.
 

danckwerts

macrumors regular
Jun 7, 2008
141
88
Richmond upon Thames
Yeah i spotted this one, but it's not clear other vendor's website from the vendors website whether you actually need a windows PC for this (see minimum requirements):

http://www.pctvsystems.com/Products/ProductsEuropeAsia/Digitalproducts/PCTVnanoStickT2/tabid/248/language/en-GB/Default.aspx

would def be tempted if it doesn't need windows at all...
I saw that but I've also seen many posts online indicating that it works on Linux.

----------

I noticed this last year and on 1 August emailed Hauppage UK to ask about its use with Macs. I quoted the reply verbatim on this thread (see my post of 20 August, #7 above), which said that the USB stick was not currently supported on a Mac, but that Elgato were currently working on it.

On 4 January this year I emailed the same guy at Hauppage referring to his earlier reply and asking, "Can you give us an indication of when it's likely to appear, or failing that give us any relevant information about receiving DVB-T2 on Apple Macs."

But this time there was no reply. I assume either he was mistaken last August, or Elgato have halted or delayed the work they were doing.

The market should eventually attract companies to develop the necessary software. Consider the countries with plans to move to DVB-T2. I recommend the pages on individual countries on the DVB website.

Start at http://www.dvb.org/about_dvb/dvb_worldwide/ and select a country from the menu on the right. Search with the string T2 and scan through the various sentences and paragraphs it finds. This reveals far more than the map of DVB-T2 deployment around the world. For example, on the map France is shown as a DVB-T country, yet on the France page, there are 21 matches to a T2 search. The most relevant is:


Ouch, that's some 3.5 years away! However, other countries have earlier plans for DVB-T2. For example, Russia had been planning to move the whole country to it in 2015, but has changed the year to 2013 and T2 broadcasts started in the region of Tatarstan on 1 March 2012.
Sorry I missed your earlier post. If it isn't Mac compatible, then they shouldn't be advertising it as such. Perhaps I should buy one and then demand a refund if it doesn't work as advertised.
 

danckwerts

macrumors regular
Jun 7, 2008
141
88
Richmond upon Thames
PCTV Systems

I've now emailed PCTV Systems to seek clarification. I think I'll also try Hauppage and Elgato. Might threaten Hauppage with the Advertising Standards Authority.;)
 

jrnorman

macrumors newbie
Jun 3, 2012
2
1
I think the PCTV claim in respect of Mac is that having captured a programme on a PC you can then stream to Apple products such as Mac and iPad. I too have contacted them through their support form today. I will post if I get a reply.
 

mat-ray

macrumors newbie
Jun 22, 2012
1
0
Just Tried - didn't work

I just found myself working next door to a PCWorld so thought I'd give the PCTV T2 Nanostick a try. MacBook Air (2012) running Lion and EyeTV 3.5.4. OS X System Report sees it as "PCTV 290e".

No joy - the setup is asking me for a specific model, and so far I've not found one that works. Taking it back now!
 

Oujmik

macrumors member
Oct 23, 2012
74
0
Presumably the PCTV stick would work in Windows under bootcamp or Parallels? I know it's far from ideal, but probably better than a separate Freeview+ HD box.

I can't believe there are no options to watch HDTV in the UK on a mac, I guess the demand is just too small. Very frustrating as the old SD is starting to look pretty rubbish compared withe streaming 1080p from you tube and my trusty Panasonic blu-ray player.
 

Matti

macrumors regular
Nov 25, 2007
109
0
I take it that there hasn't been any improvement in the situation? Been trying to find HD tuner for mac with no luck. Only HD tuner availeable is for satellite (DVB-S2). I got free HD both over air and on my cable...and no DVB-T2 or DVB-C2 support for OSX!

Sort of sucks that Elgato has such a monopoly on this stuff on OSX and they don't seem to care. Double so, since Elgato is german and their homemarket uses DVB-standards as well (as does the rest of Europe and most of the planet).
 

old john

macrumors member
Nov 18, 2005
94
2
England
Sort of sucks that Elgato has such a monopoly on this stuff on OSX and they don't seem to care. Double so, since Elgato is german and their homemarket uses DVB-standards as well (as does the rest of Europe and most of the planet).
Yes, sure most countries use DVB standards, but most of those use DVB-T for HD TV and Elgato only catered for that. The UK uses DVB-T for SD channels, but uses DVB-T2 for HD. There's a map on the DVB website showing which countries use DVB-T2 and Germany is not among them yet. The map uses different colours to show the latest digital TV technologies a country is using: DVB-T, DVB-T2, ATSC, ISDB-T or DBMT. See http://www.dvb.org/about_dvb/dvb_worldwide/DVB-T_map.pdf

A number of countries have plans to use DVB-T2 over the next several years and on the map countries change the colour as they move to DBV-T2. For example, the Russian Federation started its first DVT-T2 channel in Tatarstan, the first region in the Federation to transfer, on 1 March 2012. However, it will be some time till it's widespread across Russia, despite its current map colour. France did some tests of DVB-T2 in 2011, but has not yet changed colour as it's not likely to start moving to it until the end of 2015 or early 2016.

It has been a long wait for Elgato to support DVB-T2. This thread had been running since 26 July 2010!
 

jrg_i

macrumors member
Sep 26, 2003
30
2
Sort of sucks that Elgato has such a monopoly on this stuff on OSX
It's interesting that the other company with PVR software for Macs (Equinux's The Tube seems to be the only other one left, now) haven't come up with a product or support for the DVB-T2 markets either.

(Elgato seem to be tiring of TV on desktop computers anyway. They've not done much recently to improve the EyeTV interface though there's plenty of work needs doing. Instead they seem to be concentrating on mobile access via the Tivizen hardware and their own EyeTV mobile/micro devices, and the broadcasting game-play market.)
 

jrg_i

macrumors member
Sep 26, 2003
30
2
What EyeTV interface improvements would you like to see?
I run EyeTV on a mac connected to my living room TV.

So the biggest thing, for me, would be a good "10ft" interface. That is, one that goes full screen, is readable at a distance on my 1080p TV, completely controllable with the remote and doesn't throw dialog boxes up ever, to confound you.

Whilst I can use the iOS app for setting things to record, which takes the burden off having to remote-in to my Mac mini (but searching in the app is not possible, and you can't see the smart guide filters), I often find I have to resort to a remote mouse/keyboard (or an app like Touchpad) to take control of its behaviour. But that doesn't help with the readability.

I've had a TiVo as well, for a long time, and its interface is for me a paragon of readability and controllability. A lot could be learnt from them by anyone doing set top box or TV-based interfaces.
 

old john

macrumors member
Nov 18, 2005
94
2
England
DVB-T2 spread in 2013: has Elgato noticed??

See http://www.dvb.org/news/worldwide/list/page/1/items/96 for an index of news showing networks and even countries migrating to DVB-T2 and that DVB-T2 is a strong contender to become the core element of the ATSC 3.0 standard. There's even been a trial of DVB-T2 in the USA!

So perhaps, after our long wait (this thread started in 2010!), there's hope that we'll eventually see a DVB-T2 tuner that's OS X compatible.

I wish all followers of this thread a happy new year and an OS X-compatible, DVB-T2 tuner in 2014!
 

Porco

macrumors 68040
Mar 28, 2005
3,064
5,782
Super-long post about my recent experience with all this stuff!

I have long been annoyed that there is no solution for DVB-T2 on OS X.

I finally gave up at the end of last year and bought a cheap stand-alone unit (the August DVB400) in the hope that there will be a decent OS X solution eventually, but this should do until then. It only cost about £35, you can plug a flash drive or hard drive into its USB port to record SD or HD programmes.

The nicest thing about this over many other DVRs is it stores the recordings as .MTS video files, meaning you can play them back on a computer, including macs, using VLC or anything else that supports .MTS files.

The quality is great as long as you have a decent aerial signal, for HD especially.

The bad thing about .MTS files is that they are a bit of a pain to get into any other format apparently, meaning editing down overlapping minutes at the beginning and end of a programme is a hassle if you don't want to re-encode, losing quality in already heavily compressed HD.

Another point to bear in mind is that you realistically have to have an NTFS-formatted external hard drive/flash drive for recordings, as a FAT32 drive will chop the recordings into 500MB-ish chunks.

And finally the EPG doesn't cover the HD channels, so you have to manually set them (which you might want to anyway to give a couple of minutes padding to make sure you get whole programmes). More about this below...

But: at ~£35 + whatever your re-usuable media costs it's not bad for now. I use a powered USB hard drive I formatted in my old Windows VM (tied to my old laptop which is not capable of a Windows HD stick sadly!).

Amazon link:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/August-DVB400-Freeview-Set-Top/dp/B00BPAZGCG

- Also available on ebay, currently a few quid cheaper:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/August-DVB400-HD-Freeview-Set-Top-Box-DVB-T-Tuner-with-USB-TV-Recording-/271313839079


------

OK, also in researching for reasons why this ludicrous gap in the market exists, I stumbled upon what may be a large part of the reason (seeing as Elgato are very quiet about everything)…

You'll note above how I say there is no EPG for the HD channels on the August DVB400 right? Well I think I know why.

The BBC apparently have some control over the Freeview HD EPG data for the UK. In a deal to suit content providers, they make it a condition of decoding the HD EPG data that a manufacturer's device doesn't let users export HD recordings off the device in a usable format. This must be why all the big-name Freeview HD DVR/PVRs with EPGs for the HD channels are setup this way. The rationale the BBC use is that without this restriction, it would make it harder to obtain content from creators in the first place.

Here's a relevant bit from an Ofcom statement regarding the topic:

Ofcom 'Statement on content management on the HD Freeview platform' said:
2.4 In order to place DTT broadcasters in what it believes to be better position to secure HD content from third party rights holders, the BBC has drawn up plans to provide a content management framework for the HD DTT platform. These plans involve restricting access to broadcast HD programme data to receivers which implement content management. This means that only receivers which implement content management can process broadcast programme data to provide a consumer EPG.[1]
It goes on to detail how the lookup tables for decoding the HD EPG data will only be provided to manufacturers who play nice, basically. Personally I think the whole thing stinks, but never mind. I can see the BBC's rationale, but I regard it as based on rather flawed premises from the 3rd party content creators, and it's a nice shield for the beeb to hide behind which doesn't address first-party in-house content like their news programming.

Anyway, the full statement is available at:
http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/binaries/consultations/content_mngt/statement/statement.pdf
If anyone wants to read the whole thing.

Now for Elgato's EyeTV of course, not having an EPG for HD channels available would be a rather annoying thing. I'd be quite interested to know if users of the Elgato Satfree satellite DVB-S/S2 product does or doesn't have any issue with the EPG though… that would rather render the reasoning behind the Freeview HD restrictions rather pointless. From its webpage it doesn't seem to mention any restrictions. Weird. I'd also like to know from anyone who has a Windows DVB-T2 solution and if they have had any issues getting over-the-air EPG data for HD channels, or whether ways round it have been found (I guess using an internet-based EPG would do the trick).

Anyway, I hope this has shed some light on what is possibly (I think probably(?)) at least partially behind the lack of DVB-T2 solutions on OS X at present, from Elgato if not others.

As others have said, if other countries start using it then hopefully UK Freeview users will have a better chance of Elgato (or someone else) making an OS X solution, even if the over-the-air EPG for HD channels remains an issue. For my August DVB400, they obviously decided to just forgo the EPG. Good for them, it is the correct decision in my view.

And well done for getting to the end of this post. :D

[1] http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/binaries/consultations/content_mngt/statement/statement.pdf Section 2, sub-section 2.4, published 14 June 2010
 
Last edited:

MyAppleWorld

macrumors 6502a
Nov 1, 2005
536
57
Birmingham, UK
I have long been annoyed that there is no solution for DVB-T2 on OS X.

I finally gave up at the end of last year and bought a cheap stand-alone unit (the August DVB400) in the hope that there will be a decent OS X solution eventually, but this should do until then. It only cost about £35, you can plug a flash drive or hard drive into its USB port to record SD or HD programmes.

The nicest thing about this over many other DVRs is it stores the recordings as .MTS video files, meaning you can play them back on a computer, including macs, using VLC or anything else that supports .MTS files.

The quality is great as long as you have a decent aerial signal, for HD especially.

The bad thing about .MTS files is that they are a bit of a pain to get into any other format apparently, meaning editing down overlapping minutes at the beginning and end of a programme is a hassle if you don't want to re-encode, losing quality in already heavily compressed HD.

Another point to bear in mind is that you realistically have to have an NTFS-formatted external hard drive/flash drive for recordings, as a FAT32 drive will chop the recordings into 500MB-ish chunks.

And finally the EPG doesn't cover the HD channels, so you have to manually set them (which you might want to anyway to give a couple of minutes padding to make sure you get whole programmes). More about this below...

But: at ~£35 + whatever your re-usuable media costs it's not bad for now. I use a powered USB hard drive I formatted in my old Windows VM (tied to my old laptop which is not capable of a Windows HD stick sadly!).

Amazon link:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/August-DVB400-Freeview-Set-Top/dp/B00BPAZGCG

- Also available on ebay, currently a few quid cheaper:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/August-DVB400-HD-Freeview-Set-Top-Box-DVB-T-Tuner-with-USB-TV-Recording-/271313839079


------

OK, also in researching for reasons why this ludicrous gap in the market exists, I stumbled upon what may be a large part of the reason (seeing as Elgato are very quiet about everything)…

You'll note above how I say there is no EPG for the HD channels on the August DVB400 right? Well I think I know why.

The BBC apparently have some control over the Freeview HD EPG data for the UK. In a deal to suit content providers, they make it a condition of decoding the HD EPG data that a manufacturer's device doesn't let users export HD recordings off the device in a usable format. This must be why all the big-name Freeview HD DVR/PVRs with EPGs for the HD channels are setup this way. The rationale the BBC use is that without this restriction, it would make it harder to obtain content from creators in the first place.

Here's a relevant bit from an Ofcom statement regarding the topic:



It goes on to detail how the lookup tables for decoding the HD EPG data will only be provided to manufacturers who play nice, basically. Personally I think the whole thing stinks, but never mind. I can see the BBC's rationale, but I regard it as based on rather flawed premises from the 3rd party content creators, and it's a nice shield for the beeb to hide behind which doesn't address first-party in-house content like their news programming.

Anyway, the full statement is available at:
http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/binaries/consultations/content_mngt/statement/statement.pdf
If anyone wants to read the whole thing.

Now for Elgato's EyeTV of course, not having an EPG for HD channels available would be a rather annoying thing. I'd be quite interested to know if users of the Elgato Satfree satellite DVB-S/S2 product does or doesn't have any issue with the EPG though… that would rather render the reasoning behind the Freeview HD restrictions rather pointless. From its webpage it doesn't seem to mention any restrictions. Weird. I'd also like to know from anyone who has a Windows DVB-T2 solution and if they have had any issues getting over-the-air EPG data for HD channels, or whether ways round it have been found (I guess using an internet-based EPG would do the trick).

Anyway, I hope this has shed some light on what is possibly (I think probably(?)) at least partially behind the lack of DVB-T2 solutions on OS X at present, from Elgato if not others.

As others have said, if other countries start using it then hopefully UK Freeview users will have a better chance of Elgato (or someone else) making an OS X solution, even if the over-the-air EPG for HD channels remains an issue. For my August DVB400, they obviously decided to just forgo the EPG. Good for them, it is the correct decision in my view.

And well done for getting to the end of this post. :D

[1] http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/binaries/consultations/content_mngt/statement/statement.pdf Section 2, sub-section 2.4, published 14 June 2010
this post explains exactly why i'm struggling to source a PCTV T2 stick for windows or alternative for mac - i think they have discontinued.

A colleague at work uses an August USB T2 Tuner and he says he was unable to download the program guides for HD channels so had to use some sort of plugin to download the data from the internet.

I guess the manufacturers don't want this hassle and think SD is fine for computer tuners.

personally I'm trying to solve this scenario:

i want to record HD free view programmes to keep until I'm ready to watch them. I then want to watch them on my macbook in another room rather than on the TV

can't seem to find a workable solution.
 

Porco

macrumors 68040
Mar 28, 2005
3,064
5,782
personally I'm trying to solve this scenario:

i want to record HD free view programmes to keep until I'm ready to watch them. I then want to watch them on my macbook in another room rather than on the TV

can't seem to find a workable solution.
If you can deal with the hassle I outlined that is involved with the August unit I linked to, it could work for you. This is my set up currently:

-August DVB400 - £35
-500GB hard drive - plenty of space for this purpose, they are quite cheap, a decent one for £35-£40. You can of course go higher or lower capacity as you wish.
-External USB enclosure like this one: http://www.amazon.co.uk/BIPRA-External-Enclosure-Laptop-Powered/dp/B001EEQQ8Q - £6
-USB power plug for extra power for enclosure (it will work for the most part bus powered, but not reliably in my tests - which is why I recommend powering the drive). You may well have a spare Apple one around somewhere, I bought one for about £5, others cost even less.
-VLC, free.
-Handbrake, free.

It's a shame it's not all on your mac, I know, but: that little lot should still probably cost you less than an Elgato Freeview HD solution would, if it existed. You can use a USB flash drive if you prefer, but I'm dubious about the reliability of regularly recording GBs of HD video to a usb flash (thumb/stick) drive...

You need to format the drive in NTFS format to record programmes in HD in a single file. By default OS X reads NTFS but doesn't write to it. There are ways around this, utilities and some commands you can do in Terminal, but the latter is not terribly stable apparently(?). Like I said in my last post, I used a Windows VM to do a full format of the disc in preparation.

Also important point note: make sure the drive's name is a short single-word one, without spaces or special characters. I called mine 'AUGREC' for example (no inverted commas). If you format the drive on the August DVB400 itself it names it something that OS X has problems with. It's a shame they did that really, it causes an unnecessary problem, I'm sure it was a mere oversight on their part.

You set the timer record on the device with the remote control, you can put the recorder into standby mode with scheduled recordings set, but I would leave the hard drive powered on when you have planned recordings.

Yes, the lack of an EPG is a pain. However, I think all the UK free view channels are now HD versions of existing SD channels, so you can always browse via the SD channels and set recordings based on those times, merely changing the channel to record in the timer setting. I manually set recordings with 2 or 3 minutes of padding either side. The device seems to pick up the time over the air automatically.

After you have recorded programmes, they will be freely accessible to copy over to your mac. Obviously macs, formatted in the default HFS+ format, deal with the files' sizes fine. VLC will play back the files perfectly nicely, and Handbrake will convert them if you need to do that (though doing that is a whole other post...!).

Obviously you end up with huge files recoding HD programmes. They can average at about 3-4GB an hour depending on the programme. They look pretty good though.
 

MyAppleWorld

macrumors 6502a
Nov 1, 2005
536
57
Birmingham, UK
If you can deal with the hassle I outlined that is involved with the August unit I linked to, it could work for you. This is my set up currently:

-August DVB400 - £35
-500GB hard drive - plenty of space for this purpose, they are quite cheap, a decent one for £35-£40. You can of course go higher or lower capacity as you wish.
-External USB enclosure like this one: http://www.amazon.co.uk/BIPRA-External-Enclosure-Laptop-Powered/dp/B001EEQQ8Q - £6
-USB power plug for extra power for enclosure (it will work for the most part bus powered, but not reliably in my tests - which is why I recommend powering the drive). You may well have a spare Apple one around somewhere, I bought one for about £5, others cost even less.
-VLC, free.
-Handbrake, free.

It's a shame it's not all on your mac, I know, but: that little lot should still probably cost you less than an Elgato Freeview HD solution would, if it existed. You can use a USB flash drive if you prefer, but I'm dubious about the reliability of regularly recording GBs of HD video to a usb flash (thumb/stick) drive...

You need to format the drive in NTFS format to record programmes in HD in a single file. By default OS X reads NTFS but doesn't write to it. There are ways around this, utilities and some commands you can do in Terminal, but the latter is not terribly stable apparently(?). Like I said in my last post, I used a Windows VM to do a full format of the disc in preparation.

Also important point note: make sure the drive's name is a short single-word one, without spaces or special characters. I called mine 'AUGREC' for example (no inverted commas). If you format the drive on the August DVB400 itself it names it something that OS X has problems with. It's a shame they did that really, it causes an unnecessary problem, I'm sure it was a mere oversight on their part.

You set the timer record on the device with the remote control, you can put the recorder into standby mode with scheduled recordings set, but I would leave the hard drive powered on when you have planned recordings.

Yes, the lack of an EPG is a pain. However, I think all the UK free view channels are now HD versions of existing SD channels, so you can always browse via the SD channels and set recordings based on those times, merely changing the channel to record in the timer setting. I manually set recordings with 2 or 3 minutes of padding either side. The device seems to pick up the time over the air automatically.

After you have recorded programmes, they will be freely accessible to copy over to your mac. Obviously macs, formatted in the default HFS+ format, deal with the files' sizes fine. VLC will play back the files perfectly nicely, and Handbrake will convert them if you need to do that (though doing that is a whole other post...!).

Obviously you end up with huge files recoding HD programmes. They can average at about 3-4GB an hour depending on the programme. They look pretty good though.
Have you looked at a PCTV Broadway 2t? Their tech support told me that you can open the box and install a PCTV Nanostick DVB-T2 to gain HD support.

You can plug in and external drive for PVR functions and then everything plays via Flash in safari.
 

Porco

macrumors 68040
Mar 28, 2005
3,064
5,782
Have you looked at a PCTV Broadway 2t? Their tech support told me that you can open the box and install a PCTV Nanostick DVB-T2 to gain HD support.

You can plug in and external drive for PVR functions and then everything plays via Flash in safari.
Interesting. But a lot more expensive by the look of it and I'm not sure it really has any benefits in my use case. But still interesting!

I guess I made my set-up sound more complicated to set up than it really is. I do wish Elgato would pull their finger out, whether it's about EPG issues or otherwise. I do really love the EyeTV software, I have several of their standard def products.
 

theluggage

macrumors 601
Jul 29, 2011
4,377
3,108
this post explains exactly why i'm struggling to source a PCTV T2 stick for windows or alternative for mac - i think they have discontinued.
I have a linux-based HTPC box running MythTV, using a TBS quad PCIe tuner card. Its happily working with UK DVBT2 HD content, programme guides and all.

The Ofcom report was several years old - I don't know if the axe is still hanging, whether common sense has prevailed (as ineffective anti-piracy measures go, it sure takes the biscuit) or if its just been cracked.

The PCTV T2 stick also works under Linux.

I got a PCTV T2 stick back in the summer from Maplin - looking on their site they still have them available in some shops.

Moreover, I've had it running on my Mac under Parallels running the Mythbuntu MythTV/linux distro.

There's an alternative Linux-based solution called TVHeadEnd, which is just a backend DVB tuner/recorder, with a browser-based configuration interface: you can use it in conjunction with XBMC. I've had this running in a Debian-7 virtual machine, talking to XBMC running natively on the Mac. You can do the same with MythTV, but TVHeadEnd is rather lighter-weight than the all-singing-all-dancing MythTV, and more responsive when it comes to channel changes etc.

Sorry - none of those are "it just works" solutions, but it does suggest that Windows Media Centre under Parallels may be worth a punt.

(NB: I've tried this in Virtualbox rather than Parallels and it wouldn't work reliably).
 

old john

macrumors member
Nov 18, 2005
94
2
England
Is it really because of Apple we can't get DVB-T2?

Tired of waiting for a simple DVB-T2 device for the Mac, I sent an email to Hauppauge, which makes such devices for Windows machines. I wrote:
I am wondering why, after years of waiting and more countries getting and planning DVB-T2 services, does there still seem to be no DVB-T2 tuner that works directly with Apple’s OS X. Do you know the answer? The iPlayer shows how good HD can be on a 27-inch Mac and it’s frustrating to be stuck with a TV tuner that can’t receive Freeview HD!
The swift reply was that I need to ask Apple, because it's Apple's OS and only Apple will allow such a product to be developed.

Can that really be the case? Can Apple stop others developing such a product?

If so, why would they prevent it? I have no experience of Apple TV, but I assume its functions are quite different and a DVB-T2 tuner for Mac wouldn't be competition for it. Is that right?

And any suggestions as to how to get the question to the appropriate part of Apple?
 

danckwerts

macrumors regular
Jun 7, 2008
141
88
Richmond upon Thames
Don't believe a word of it

I think Hauppauge can't be bothered. It's not up to Apple to develop such products and they have no mechanism to prevent others from doing so. They don't have to allow such a product to be sold on the App Store but that's a different matter. What surprises me is that no other company has come in to fill the gap.