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Apr 12, 2001
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Dyson recently launched the Pure Cool Link, a fan that looks and functions similarly to the company's previous line of high-end oscillating personal air controlling devices, but now with the added bonus of cleaning the air in a home (via The Guardian). Thanks to its HEPA filter, the Pure Cool Link promises to remove 99.97% of particles as minuscule as 0.3 microns, so potentially hazardous pollutants like pollen, bacteria, mold, Asbestos, odors, tobacco smoke and even carbon dust can all be successfully captured.

The company is also integrating its connected smartphone app, Dyson Link, into its new Pure Cool Link fan, which marks the first time one of its fans will be able to be controlled through an app. The experience will let users monitor both indoor and outdoor air quality, and even let them set the connected device to automatically clean a room whenever the standards for clean air drop below a certain mark. The Dyson Link app was previously supported as a connected accessory to the Dyson 360 Eye robotic vacuum cleaner.

Dyson-Cool-Link-app.jpg
Company founder James Dyson said: "We think it is polluted outside of our homes, but the air inside can be far worse. Dyson engineers focused on developing a purifier that automatically removes ultrafine allergens, odours and pollutants from the indoor air, feeding real time air quality data back to you."
Beyond air quality monitoring, the app gives users a suite of basic remote control functionality to the Pure Cool Link while displaced from it, including: a scheduling system, manual on/off controls, temperature and humidity numbers, and a complete history of the air quality levels in a room. It can also give users an updated reminder of the filter life inside of the Pure Cool Link, so they can be warned ahead of time when it needs to be changed.

Other features of the Pure Cool Link include a "night-time mode" that turns down the audible noise disturbance of the fan and dims the display, for users who want to keep its features running through night hours. Although the fan isn't directly billed as a personal air condition device like Dyson's other products, the Pure Cool Link can sense when it is a warmer day, automatically helping to drop the temperature within the room a few degrees "with smooth, long-range air flow."

Dyson-Cool-Link-fan.jpg

The range of connected Dyson devices is limited to the Pure Cool Link system, but the company is expected to continue to expand these smartphone app connectivity features to its other products in the future. At launch, the new Pure Cool Link system does not integrate with Apple's HomeKit platform.

Those interested can purchase the Dyson Pure Cool Link tower for $499.99 from the company's website, in either blue or white. There is also a smaller desktop version of the new air quality-controlling fan, but it appears to currently not be available to purchase from Dyson's United States store. If abiding by the pricing tiers of previous Dyson products, the desk fan version of the Pure Cool Link would be $100 less and come in at $399.99.

The Dyson Link app can be downloaded from the iTunes App Store for free. [Direct Link]

Article Link: Dyson Launches First Smartphone Connected Fan With Air Quality Monitoring and Scheduling Features
 
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SteveJobs2.0

macrumors 6502a
Mar 9, 2012
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Hope that this one is more quiet. I bought an earlier version and the fan was too loud even at the lowest setting. I don't mind paying for nice things, but I do expect them to function flawlessly.
 
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justperry

macrumors G4
Aug 10, 2007
11,598
8,292
I'm a rolling stone.
Although the fan isn't directly billed as a personal air condition device like Dyson's other products, the Pure Cool Link can sense when it is a warmer day, automatically helping to drop the temperature within the room a few degrees "with smooth, long-range air flow."

This is of course complete nonsense, a fan is NOT an air conditioner as in it cools the air like real air conditioners do.
It's also nonsense that a fan can cool a room if there is no connection (tube or so) to another room or the outside air.
A Fan only displaces air, it cools you down but the air itself is of the same temperature as the surrounding air.

Hope that this one is more quiet. I bought an earlier version and the fan was too loud even at the lowest setting. I don't mind paying for nice things, but I do expect them to function flawlessly.

I don't get people who complain about these fans, the are quite a bit less noisy than standard fans, if you want to cool down without a lot of noise get an air conditioner or go sit in the fridge.:p


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I really like these fans, BUT, in my eyes they are way overpriced, if dyson would sell them for around $100 they would sell millions and make more profit.
 
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Junior117

macrumors 6502
Apr 9, 2015
281
353
Toronto, Canada
I do really like these fans. The fact that I don't have to worry about cleaning the stupid blades and the mesh from any other fan alone makes it worth it for me. As for price, I don't really care; it's not really that expensive to me (now if it has a mountain of problems, then price is DEFINITELY an issue).

$500 and no HomeKit? Pass.

That would be nice if it was HomeKit enabled, but I don't know if HomeKit has built-in commands for controlling fans (developers can make their own custom commands, though).
 
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jumanji

macrumors regular
Sep 12, 2003
194
287
Austin, TX
Hope that this one is more quiet. I bought an earlier version and the fan was too loud even at the lowest setting. I don't mind paying for nice things, but I do expect them to function flawlessly.

i have one too and they get really dirty at the intake on the fans.
 
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SteveJobs2.0

macrumors 6502a
Mar 9, 2012
827
1,347
This is of course complete nonsense, a fan is NOT an air conditioner as in it cools the air like real air conditioners do.
It's also nonsense that a fan can cool a room if there is no connection (tube or so) to another room or the outside air.
A Fan only displaces air, it cools you down but the air itself is of the same temperature as the surrounding air.



I don't get people who complain about these fans, the are quite a bit less noisy than standard fans, if you want to cool down without a lot of noise get an air conditioner or go sit in the fridge.:p


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I really like these fans, BUT, in my eyes they are way overpriced, if dyson would sell them for around $100 they would sell millions and make more profit.

I have two regular fans too, one tower and one traditional, and they are not any more noisy.
 
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nutmac

macrumors 603
Mar 30, 2004
5,060
4,205
That would be nice if it was HomeKit enabled, but I don't know if HomeKit has built-in commands for controlling fans (developers can make their own custom commands, though).
If anything, I like getting a status of all HomeKit enable devices from the comfort of my bed or when I am away from home.

Also, voice activating the fan from Apple Watch is very handy.
 
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dannys1

macrumors 68030
Sep 19, 2007
2,993
5,355
UK
Pretty every product post here just has the usual subjects in the comments moaning about how its too expensive, doesn't do this A or B, won't be buying because of... blah blah blah. There really are some right negative knuts in this place.
 
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sailmac

macrumors 6502
Jan 15, 2008
318
78
1) Not an April Fool's joke. It is a real product on the Dyson site.

2) The HEPA filter is expected to last 12 months if the device is run 12 hours per day. But Dyson hasn't posted the cost of replacement filters. That could be the real deal killer. I run my Austin Air HEPA units (4 of them) 24/7 and have done so for more than 10 years. The filters are effective for 2 to 4 years depending on conditions. If I ran the Dyson 24/7 I'd be replacing the filter every 6 months, and possibly more frequently if they aren't rated for the volume of air I currently exchange. So the total cost of operating a Dyson looks like it could be considerably more than effective alternatives.

3) But, hey, it would look right at home sitting next to my cMP cheese grater case, or in the presence of an original iSight FireWire camera from 2003 :D

AllCheeseGraters.png
 
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CFreymarc

Suspended
Sep 4, 2009
3,969
1,149
We have two Dyson vacuums: one is more than 13 years old and the other one is around 8. Both function as new.

You pay for it now or you pay for it later. It is cheaper to pay for it up front where the quality keeps the product lasting beyond three or four lifetimes of cheaper products. I'm sure the current line of Mac Pro's will be working and supporting OS updates ten years from now. Bought a top end, terabyte SSD, Macbook Pro three years ago and it still keeping up with updates.

Too bad Curtis-Mathus is not around anymore except for a Chinese brand licensing. My grandfather had a C-M television from the 70's that worked like new up to the digital switch-over. Then he ended up ordering a specialized digital converter box that specifically handed the non-standard impedance of C-M analog inputs.
 
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Shirasaki

macrumors G4
May 16, 2015
10,514
4,266
go sit in the fridge
I want to live in the fridge all day long. Sydney's autumn is abnormally hot when comparing this year with last year.
But, hey, it would look right at home sitting next to my cMP cheese grater case, or in the presence of an original iSight FireWire camera from 2003 :D
View attachment 624552
So such whopping price is because they have a great design. Apple product had a good design before. Hmm.
 
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sailmac

macrumors 6502
Jan 15, 2008
318
78
So such whopping price is because they have a great design. Apple product had a good design before. Hmm.

No argument from me on that one, the Dyson Pure Cool Link Tower has a beautifully designed appearance. And, yup, that exquisite design is built into the price. And, more yup, there is a remarkable similarity with some of Apple's earlier great looking designs for which we also paid some premium.

In terms of functionality, my second comment was aimed at how it looks like the filter a) has a short life, and b) appears to be rated for smaller volumes of air exchange than my application demands. From that perspective it would be expensive to continuously operate, and not a good fit in that instance.

For some users this could be a real winner, with an attractive mix of function, aesthetics and price. Like an Apple product. ;)
 
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