Eero WiFi Products Available in Apple Retail Stores This Week

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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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Back in May, Apple's online store began offering eero's lineup of mesh WiFi products, and this week, eero devices are also available for purchase in Apple's retail stores.


As outlined in a recent blog post, eero devices are being made available in Apple retail stores in the United States, Canada, UK, Germany, France, Italy, and Spain.

Right now, Apple Stores in the U.S. don't appear to be showing stock available for pickup, so stores may not have supplies until later this week.

Online purchases are available, with Apple offering multiple eero Pro Mesh WiFi setups with one or two beacons and pricing starting at $300, along with the eero Pro Mesh WiFi Router and a Pro Router Three pack.

Apple also sells the standard eero Mesh WiFi router, the eero Mesh WiFi system, and the Beacon Mesh WiFi Range Extender. Eero products are HomeKit-compatible.

Article Link: Eero WiFi Products Available in Apple Retail Stores This Week
 
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nutmac

macrumors 601
Mar 30, 2004
4,690
3,112
I love eero, but I wish they would hurry up with Wi-Fi 6 version. Most of their competitors are now offering Wi-Fi 6.

Yes, I realize the benefits of Wi-Fi 6 is not as far reaching as Wi-Fi 5, but it does bring some tangible benefits like higher capacity and power efficiency.
 

IPPlanMan

macrumors 6502
Dec 25, 2009
359
1,400
I love eero, but I wish they would hurry up with Wi-Fi 6 version. Most of their competitors are now offering Wi-Fi 6.

Yes, I realize the benefits of Wi-Fi 6 is not as far reaching as Wi-Fi 5, but it does bring some tangible benefits like higher capacity and power efficiency.
I wish Apple would hurry up with supporting Wi-Fi 6 on its Laptops or Desktops. None of the current models support it. Certain iPhone and iPad models do.
 

IPPlanMan

macrumors 6502
Dec 25, 2009
359
1,400
Why apple chose to leave this money on the table and leave this sector to make more watchbands and cases or whatever is beyond me.
I agree. I've demoted my Time Capsule and turned its WiFi off to be an "Ethernet" backup drive which is then branch connected to my Cable Modem's Ethernet port. I figure that if I have a Gigabit connection that I should actually get it.

Just remember: Apple said "no" to this to say "yes" to something else.... like animojis, etc.
 

Osxguy

macrumors member
Jun 23, 2010
87
83
San Jose
I am a tin hat wearing and giving Jeff from amazon any more money is a bad idea. But Plume wifi routers are better. They say your data is safe.. I always have to put that in because well. We all know a data breach is always Around the corner. My clients have had some weird issues with these, just not as customer focused as Plume is.
 

pianophile

macrumors member
Sep 2, 2002
86
57
Midwest
I understand all of the reluctance to buy from Amazon, but - I bought an Eero base + beacon last year, and I must admit, this is one of the most trouble-free, satisfying tech purchases I've ever made. Fast, reliable, easy to share guest logins, etc., etc..

I go weeks without thinking about it at all, and I can't really think of higher praise that I could bestow upon networking gear.
 

farewelwilliams

macrumors 68040
Jun 18, 2014
3,202
13,140
number one feature missing: bandwidth monitor.

they do have realtime bandwidth monitor, but it doesn't record the history.
 
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SSDGUY

macrumors 6502a
Jul 27, 2009
596
738
Do they make a model that integrates a cable modem? I need to upgrade mine in order to get decent speed with Comcast, and figure an all-in-one modem and wfifi router would be a good way to go.
 

arkhanjel

macrumors regular
Nov 3, 2003
141
113
As good as eero is for set up and reliability they suck as far as using your actual speed available. My main base station here consistently shows I get 940 Mbps down but only actually gives my network about 150 Mbps max.
 
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deconstruct60

macrumors G3
Mar 10, 2009
9,131
1,887
Why apple chose to leave this money on the table and leave this sector to make more watchbands and cases or whatever is beyond me.
The "swap" here is not for watchbands. More so it likely is AppleTV and HomePod.

Why they got out is somewhat that there really wasn't money on the table. If your ISP provider give you a WiFi router for "free" ( contractually bury it into the base price) then primarily competing with something that people already have. IPTV from internet provider is only going to muddle that a bit more ( where VLAN and/or assign that data to different metering and/or QoS ).

Some of the same drama is coming to AppleTV and ( a bit less direct ) to HomePod . Apple TV gets to move the primary app and content services to other platforms. Apple really can't move a HomeKit Router Security app over to a 3rd party router.

At the core AppleTV and HomePod are running 'fork' of iOS. Both at this point on on tvOS. ( versus NetBSD/FreeBSD , VxWorks , or some other non homegrown Apple operating system based on Dwarin/Mach baseline that everything else uses ). [ Similarly was Apple going to make a "router" SoC from a fork of the A-series processor? Probably not. Vast majority of consumer routers have some router product SoC in them. ]. So Apple sells more of their own processors ( largely as unchanged "hand me downs" ... so development is basically already paid for. ) with their own OS with this new path.

The other major factor is Apple sold mid-high priced routers when that was relatively rare. Now there is a "war" of who can build the most expensive routers with every feature checked and present. $600-700 WiFi 6 + Mash + MultiGigabit WAN interface. Right now it would be a far more crowded space for a very "sleepy" product that evolved at glacial pace ( many , many year between updates). [ Macs are stuck on WiFi 5. Apple is moving more than market slow there ( even AMD laptops are tossing in Intel WiFI 6 to keep pace) . If they were also doing that in the router space they'd be getting run over in the space they were trying to be in before. ] If Plume , Eero , Google/Nest WiFi , Orbi , Amplifi/Ubiquiti , and some other higher end products from other broad range vendors were alll doing a bad job there would be a bigger window for Apple.



In terms of back up services, there was a fork to the cloud. And Apple chucked AFS ( and any Samba SMB stack went out the window with its adoption of GPL3. ). Conceptually though they could put that back with always one HomeKit hub with an attacked drive. But pointing folks at off site backups gets more redundancy ( versus no RAID 1 or better ) and disaster recovery built into the service. So in the "Time Capsule" variant was under competitive distress also.


Apple doesn't make printers anymore either ... and that isn't exactly killing their revenue or earnings. Trying to sell everything to everybody doesn't necessarily make you more money in the long term.


if AppleTV and/or HomePod crashes and burns may Apple take a looking at very much larger pile of RF engineering and radio base band processor folks they have now along with end devices with 6-7 MIMO channels they have to deal with and say... they want to put a deeper footprint into the business, then maybe. But if Apple can get having a always on HomeKit hub with value add services off the ground that will be a better position than trying to "gateway" path to the boarder Internet ( and tasked with keeping the bad stuff out or getting out from the inside. )
 
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Neepman

macrumors 6502
Jul 31, 2008
485
535
The "swap" here is not for watchbands. More so it likely is AppleTV and HomePod.

Why they got out is somewhat that there really wasn't money on the table. If your ISP provider give you a WiFi router for "free" ( contractually bury it into the base price) then primarily competing with something that people already have. IPTV from internet provider is only going to muddle that a bit more ( where VLAN and/or assign that data to different metering and/or QoS ).

Some of the same drama is coming to AppleTV and ( a bit less direct ) to HomePod . Apple TV gets to move the primary app and content services to other platforms. Apple really can't move a HomeKit Router Security app over to a 3rd party router.

At the core AppleTV and HomePod are running 'fork' of iOS. Both at this point on on tvOS. ( versus NetBSD/FreeBSD , VxWorks , or some other non homegrown Apple operating system based on Dwarin/Mach baseline that everything else uses ). [ Similarly was Apple going to make a "router" SoC from a fork of the A-series processor? Probably not. Vast majority of consumer routers have some router product SoC in them. ]. So Apple sells more of their own processors ( largely as unchanged "hand me downs" ... so development is basically already paid for. ) with their own OS with this new path.

The other major factor is Apple sold mid-high priced routers when that was relatively rare. Now there is a "war" of who can build the most expensive routers with every feature checked and present. $600-700 WiFi 6 + Mash + MultiGigabit WAN interface. Right now it would be a far more crowded space for a very "sleepy" product that evolved at glacial pace ( many , many year between updates). [ Macs are stuck on WiFi 5. Apple is moving more than market slow there ( even AMD laptops are tossing in Intel WiFI 6 to keep pace) . If they were also doing that in the router space they'd be getting run over in the space they were trying to be in before. ] If Plume , Eero , Google/Nest WiFi , Orbi , Amplifi/Ubiquiti , and some other higher end products from other broad range vendors were alll doing a bad job there would be a bigger window for Apple.



In terms of back up services, there was a fork to the cloud. And Apple chucked AFS ( and any Samba SMB stack went out the window with its adoption of GPL3. ). Conceptually though they could put that back with always one HomeKit hub with an attacked drive. But pointing folks at off site backups gets more redundancy ( versus no RAID 1 or better ) and disaster recovery built into the service. So in the "Time Capsule" variant was under competitive distress also.


Apple doesn't make printers anymore either ... and that isn't exactly killing their revenue or earnings. Trying to sell everything to everybody doesn't necessarily make you more money in the long term.


if AppleTV and/or HomePod crashes and burns may Apple take a looking at very much larger pile of RF engineering and radio base band processor folks they have now along with end devices with 6-7 MIMO channels they have to deal with and say... they want to put a deeper footprint into the business, then maybe. But if Apple can get having a always on HomeKit hub with value add services off the ground that will be a better position than trying to "gateway" path to the boarder Internet ( and tasked with keeping the bad stuff out or getting out from the inside. )
Very good analysis. Except for the "IF" in HomePod crashing and burning... I agree now its either a crap wanna-kill-yourself-getting-it-to-work cheap router or spending close to a Grand with no middle.
 
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macpro2000

macrumors 6502a
Apr 20, 2005
962
572
For those, like me, who are trying to avoid the Google/Amazon entanglement, I bought the Netgear Orbi system as a refurb a year or so ago and am very happy with it.
I had and thought that the Orbi was the biggest piece of garbage ever. Netgear support sucks unless you can speak the Indian language. At least when you call Eero support you get a well english spoken American.
 

twolf2919

macrumors regular
Aug 26, 2014
211
348
...this is one of the most trouble-free, satisfying tech purchases I've ever made. Fast, reliable, easy to share guest logins, etc., etc..

I go weeks without thinking about it at all, and I can't really think of higher praise that I could bestow upon networking gear.
You must be a more demanding user than me - the only time I want to think about my wifi router is when I decide on the purchase and when I set it up. After that I expect not to think about it until the next router purchase. That's why I loved the AirPort Extreme. Had that thing for going on 10 years and just recently replaced it with an TP-Link AC1900. The Apple router is still working fine, mind you, but I needed something with better range - and it was time to at least get 802.11ac :) (I probably have 20-30 wifi devices in my house and *none* of them use wifi-6 yet).
 

deconstruct60

macrumors G3
Mar 10, 2009
9,131
1,887
Very good analysis. Except for the "IF" in HomePod crashing and burning...
the first AppleTV was pretty much not what it is now. (and Apple worked at getting it going over a decent amount of time) For a first iteration and no substantive evolutionary response yet, well. Short term yeah , it is probably not making as much money as AirExtreme was at the end when Apple was milking that cash cow. AirPod too needs repricing for the large ( pretending that highest end Sonos was all had to worry about was a bad move ) and needs a far more affordable 'side kick' ( like AP Express ) . The sales never were huge so weren't that far off the ground to "crash".

And for Apple to stop letting Siri fall so far behind on "smarts". (that isn't just a HomePod problem).

Apple does have a long list of stuff to fix. HomePod needs better cores to be local (private) "smarter" too. More ecosystem synergy . etc.


I agree now its either a crap wanna-kill-yourself-getting-it-to-work cheap router or spending close to a Grand with no middle.
There is a middle. WiFi 6 is "new and shiny"... a year or so from now those prices won't hold. ( the typical long term deep erosion of prices in the router space ... another reason why Apple isn't particularly interested. It runs counter to their "reprice when we replace it" modus operandi Couple that to long Airport product cycles and have a problem over the long term. )
 
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