EU Advertisers Criticize New App Tracking Privacy Controls in iOS 14

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A Google-backed group of European digital advertising associations has criticized Apple for requiring apps in iOS 14 to seek additional permission from users before tracking them across other apps and websites, reports Reuters.

Sixteen marketing associations, some of which are backed by Facebook and Alphabet's Google, faulted Apple for not adhering to an ad-industry system for seeking user consent under European privacy rules. Apps will now need to ask for permission twice, increasing the risk users will refuse, the associations argued.
During its iOS 14 preview at WWDC last week, Apple explained to developers several of its new user privacy features, which include new app tracking controls and transparency.

Specifically, developers are now required to get user consent before tracking them. When an app wants to track the user, a consent pop-up appears saying the app "would like permission to track you across apps and websites owned by other companies." Developers are given several lines below the main text to explain why the permission is being sought.

The system requires that apps only need to be granted permission once, and users can see which apps they have consented to track them in the Settings app, allowing them to change their preferences as and when required.

According to the report, the group of European marketing firms said the pop-up warning and the limited ability to customize it still carries "a high risk of user refusal."

Last week, however, Apple engineers said the company would improve a free tool for developers that uses anonymous, aggregated data to measure whether advertising campaigns are working. The tool does not trigger the tracking pop-up because it's specifically engineered not to track individual users.

Article Link: EU Advertisers Criticize New App Tracking Privacy Controls in iOS 14
 

RickC519

macrumors newbie
Jul 3, 2020
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Bayville, NJ
According to the report, the group of European marketing firms said the pop-up warning and the limited ability to customize it still carries "a high risk of user refusal."
firms said the pop-up warning and the limited ability to customize it still carries "a high risk of user refusal."


Exactly. My data is mine. If you want to use it then you must pay me.
 

himanshumodi

macrumors 6502
May 18, 2012
387
308
India
I recently moved to UK, and I find that whole cookie warning for each website genuinely frustrating. Reading what I am enabling or not is not at all a straightforward thing. I used to read and allow bare minimum option. But it quickly got really onerous. I am not sure certain if whatever regulation that has led to the whole situation is really effective. This allowing of "customization" only leads to websites customizing it for the ways that good for the website/app and not for the users.

I would much rather have this the way apple seems to have implemented the warning. Also, the free tool sounds useful for advertisers. The problem with the advertisers is they don't want Apple to be the gatekeeper of what data they get, and basically want ALL and AS MUCH data from end users as they can get.
 

shplock

macrumors 6502
Dec 25, 2015
265
259
Somewhere in a Galaxy far far away
Let me see if I have this figured correctly. A group of advertisers who are backed by Google(which itself makes it fortune from advertising) is criticising Apple who is a competitor to Google. They are complaining that Apple are allowing users of their products to have more privacy which thus makes it harder for Google and these advertisers to track the users and make profits from them as well as monetise their data by selling it to political consultancy firms or to the Russian government or whomever. Google and the advertisers seem to think that they have a genuine case and that somehow that we will not think for ourselves to work out what I just highlighted.
Yeah, that is really going to make me cheer them on /S
 

itsmilo

macrumors 68040
Sep 15, 2016
3,366
7,329
Berlin, Germany
Ok i read this but where is their actual argument? Lol if anything this seems to be how GDPR should be followed in the first place on ANY platform. Suckers

BTW i haven’t seen that pop up on the iOS 14 beta yet. Does that mean all tracking is disabled by default now until their apps r updated or are they all tracking without me able to block it until again the apps r updated?

and WHAT tracking does is actually block? Surely not everything? Is there a sheet?
 

phenste

macrumors member
Sep 16, 2012
88
401
Oh. This headline had me going, ”WHAT?!” then I read that it’s a Google-backed group. Of course they’re gonna whine about this feature.

I was gonna say “it’s funny they’d do this in the EU of all places,” but, before/at the risk of sounding like a stupid American (which is secretly all I am)—isn’t the EU the exact kinda place that’d be like “no, this is great, you [the group protesting this] are ridiculous”—or am I confusing them with another government?
 

Unggoy Murderer

macrumors 6502
Jan 28, 2011
422
616
Edinburgh, Scotland
I recently moved to UK, and I find that whole cookie warning for each website genuinely frustrating. [...]
This wasn't a UK thing, it was from the EU back in 2010 or so. In 2018, the GDPR sharpened its teeth a bit, and the UK wrote most of the GDPR into UK law via the Data Protection Act (2018).

As a web developer myself, the tools (when executed poorly, which most of the time) are frustrating to use because they prey on you taking the easy route to suit their own interests. If we keep to the "spirit" of the GDPR, it really should be a lot easier and better for the visitor, not just in terms of UX, but in privacy across the Internet.
 
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