Fast 1TB Hard Drive

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by Chaos123x, Feb 10, 2009.

  1. Chaos123x macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2008
    #1
    What would be a good terabyte hard drive to use in my mac pro?

    I want something that will be able to handle DV and HDV video editing really well.


    So what is the fastest 1tb or higher drive I can get.


    Looking to pay around $90-$150 on the drive.

    I was looking at the SAMSUNG Spinpoint F1 HD103UJ 1TB.

    But I am not sure their would be a faster drive out there by now?
     
  2. blimeys macrumors newbie

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  3. pwn247 macrumors 6502

    pwn247

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    Location:
    West Virginia, USA
    #3
    When it comes to 1TB drives, they're all about the same. But truly, it's personal preference.

    If I were to buy one today, I would go for the Seagate Barracuda 1TB drive over here at NewEgg for $169. I've always had great luck with Seagate.

    And just a warning: Don't buy "budget drives". I got a Maxtor 500GB drive for really cheap last year, and it hasn't been good (the drive works fine, but it's just hella loud). So buy brandnames: Western Digital, Seagate, or Samsung. I have no experience with the Toshiba brand, so that one's up in the air.
     
  4. xgman macrumors 601

    xgman

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    #4


    ditto on this WD Black one. bit better than the samsung. The seagate barracuda is fraught with firmware problems and easily bricks. Avoid.

    by the way, I have the spinpoint, WD Black and the Segate barracuda,.
     
  5. Chaos123x thread starter macrumors 68000

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    Jul 8, 2008
    #5
    I guess that works.

    All my other drives are Western Digital.


    I just heard the Samsung was faster though?
     
  6. TrapOx macrumors 6502

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    Denver
    #6
    I've had several WD drives that were DOA out of the box.
     
  7. TheStrudel macrumors 65816

    TheStrudel

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    Jan 5, 2008
    #7
    The samsung is faster, and I would suggest it. It uses a three platter 334GB/platter design that causes it to perform a bit faster in most ways than competing 1 TB drives. Also runs a bit cooler.
     
  8. sidewinder macrumors 68020

    sidewinder

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    #8
    Funny. I run a data center with hundreds of disks and I have tried them all. I would take the Seagate ST31000340NS over ANY Western Digital or Samsung drive.

    Run a data center for a few years and you find out a lot about what really works and what doesn't. I don't like driving to my data center in the middle of night so I use Seagate drives.

    S-
     
  9. Stuart in Oz macrumors 6502

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    Sydney, Australia
    #9
    Problem is, looking at the Seagate site, they have so many different ranges and models. In Enterprise they seem to have 4 or 5 ranges and 20+ models, same in small business/home user categories.

    I assume some models are better than others.

    What do you guys use?
     
  10. CaptainChunk macrumors 68020

    CaptainChunk

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    Phoenix, AZ
    #10
    And Maxtor isn't a brand name? :confused: Sure, they haven't been making the most desirable hard drives as of late, but they've been in business for decades. They even bought out Quantum a few years back.

    All hard drive manufacturers are like this, to a certain extent. Hitachi's hard drive website is even more fun than that. ;)

    The current Seagate models that most consumers are familiar with are the 7200.11 (the normal 7,200-rpm "Barracuda" model you can buy at most stores) and the ES2. The later is essentially an enterprise version that has a higher MTBF and is thus better suited for use in servers and RAID arrays, where disk access is virtually non-stop. The actual performance difference, if any is negligible. Both lines have 5-year warranties. I'd say if you are only after a single-disk setup (and not a RAID), I'd get the 7200.11 and save a few bucks.
     
  11. Chaos123x thread starter macrumors 68000

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    #11
    i was the overnight guy running a data center for 2 years.

    I never once saw what kind of hard drives we had.
     
  12. Markleshark macrumors 603

    Markleshark

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    Location:
    Carlisle, Up Norf!
    #12
    Don't be fooled, there were issues with the early Samsung F1s, but hopefully they have those sorted.
     
  13. Stuart in Oz macrumors 6502

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    Sydney, Australia
    #13
    Thanks mate, useful info.

    I've currently got a top-of-the-line iMac 24" which I've been hammering with 12 hour a day business database use, EyeTV recording in the evening and then video re-encoding through the night.

    Needless to say, I should have bought a Mac Pro instead, as I'm definitely noticing the limitations of the consumer design - foremost being that the HDD is failing after only 10 months, and the heat generated requires me to have the fans turned up to max all the time.

    I'm already saving for the new Mac Pro, and I'll put some ES2 or similar grade drives in there now I know what to look for.

    Cheers!
     
  14. Lesser Evets macrumors 68040

    Lesser Evets

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    Jan 7, 2006
    #14
    I have a Hitachi, WD, and Seagate 1TB drives in my Pro. They are all pretty much identical in function, and they seem to last well enough.

    And every Maxtor I have had has bombed badly before or around 1 year of use. I would be VERY careful when buying Maxtor drives.... in other words, I will never buy another one.
     
  15. slughead macrumors 68040

    slughead

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    Apr 28, 2004
    #15
    2nd ditto on WD. I got 4 WD 1TB "Greens" for my dad, they seem fast, quiet, and cool (temperature wise).
     
  16. slughead macrumors 68040

    slughead

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    Apr 28, 2004
    #16
    You have to watch out though, Seagate bought Maxtor a few years ago and I think they're passing some Maxtor Drives as Seagate (unfounded theory alert!)

    hitachi/IBM are basically the same too, FYI

    As for seagate 1TBs: I'm sure they're reliable (as seagates tend to be, from my experience), but the 1TB model in particular has some bad firmware issues (as others have pointed out).

    People need to really stop making assumptions about brand just because of a single model problem (apart from Maxtor, they SUCK :) ). Seagates have always been awesome for me, this 1TB model is just a bad lot. The next HD they make will almost certainly be fine.
     
  17. xgman macrumors 601

    xgman

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    Aug 6, 2007
    #17

    Well, at least on this model range there are problems. I am a victim of a ST31000 bricked drive myself. They did replace it with newer firmware, but it was a big pain.



    SEAGATE'S FLAGSHIP desktop Barracuda 7200.11 drives, in particular the 1TB (ST31000340AS) units, are failing at an alarming rate and prompting outrage from their faithful customers.

    A new self-bricking feature apparently resides in faulty firmware microcode which will rear its ugly head sometime at boot detection. Essentially the drive will be working as normal for a while, then - out of the blue - it'll brick itself to death. The next time you reboot your computer the drive will simply lock itself up as a failsafe and won't be detected by the BIOS. In other words, there's power, spin-up, but no detection to enable booting.

    Naturally the Seagate forums (as well as many other customer-driven forums, like etailers and hardware sites) are flooded with testimonies of customers' experiences with Seagate support. These are helpful enough to ship you a new drive, as per the warranty, but invariably the drives end up bricking as well.

    fail

    RMA and Data Recovery Centres are also reporting that there's a very high rate of failure on these drives. One user in particular reports having set up a 6 TB drive array and over the course of 1 month having half the drives fail on him. No official stats are available, but at least one RMA middleman has told us there's about 30-40% failure rates.

    According to data recovery experts Seagate has diagnosed the problem and issued a new firmware to address it. However, drives that have already been affected can't have the firmware applied to them due to their locked-down status.

    Users are extra-peeved because beyond the usual RMA drill, if they want to recover the data on those drives they can get stuck with a hefty data recovery bill to pay.

    Over a month into the problem Seagate had still not come back to customers with an official solution. Despite the company updating the firmware on newer drives, it has issued no recall on the firmware-defective drives that are still on shop shelves. They must be waiting for some grand event to come and go, say a shareholder meeting?

    Drive origin and firmware seem to be Thailand and SD15, but at least one user reports having had identical problems with a unit from the Wuxi(ng) fab and the SD35 firmware.
     
  18. sidewinder macrumors 68020

    sidewinder

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    Northern California
    #19
    xgman,

    Do you buy SATA 3.0GBs NAS or iSCSI storage solutions for data centers? No company I know sells these units with Western Digital drives. They all come with Seagate NS drives. There is a reason for this.

    The servers I have that came with WD drives have been the servers that have had the most drive failures. WD's new drives may be better. But their previous Enterprise class drives have left a lot to be desired on the reliability front.

    No drive type is impervious to failure and no company is impervious to QC issues or firmware problems.

    Seagate's track record shows that they stand behind their product and that it works better and more reliably than others on the market. That's why all the big storage iron companies use Seagate NS drives.

    S-
     
  19. slughead macrumors 68040

    slughead

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2004
    #20
    hey uh.. did you just ignore everything he wrote? He was only writing about the 1TB model, which btw: ARE CRAP. Seagate is probably awesome 99% of the time, but they messed up with this particular model, and since this is a thread ABOUT 1TB drives in particular, seagate is the loser here.

    10 points for ignorance dude. Way to be a blind fanboi.
     
  20. sidewinder macrumors 68020

    sidewinder

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    Dec 10, 2008
    Location:
    Northern California
    #21
    slughead,

    I have been buying and using 1TB Seagate NS drives since they came out. I just picked up a another NAS (a Sun Fishworks) with 46 1TB Seagate drives in it. I have never had any significant problem with them.

    I read what he wrote. I even read the articles he provided links to.

    My long term (14 years now) experience with enterprise grade servers, data storage, etc., has proven to me that Seagate makes the best Enterprixe class drive, period.

    I am not a "fanboi". I just know what works and what doesn't.

    S-
     
  21. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #22
    I've had similar issues with older WD drives, and it put me off for a long time. I do wonder about their newer gear though, and might consider giving a small quantity a try if the opportunity arises.

    Other than that, Seagate ...NS models are the bread-and-butter enterprise SATA models. Their SAS drives aren't bad either. ;) :p
    Did you ever have to replace one?
    Which version? Enterprise (model #'s end in NS) or consumer ((model #'s end in AS).

    They're definitely having issues with their consumer drives ATM, and, as mentioned earlier, all of the drive manufacturers have had, and will continue to have QC issues. Frequency and scale make the difference though. ;)
    I think the difference of Enterprise and Consumer models isn't recognized easily by everyone. :confused:
     
  22. Chaos123x thread starter macrumors 68000

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    Jul 8, 2008
    #23
    I think I narrowed it down to the Samsung Spinpoint F1 and the WD Black.

    Anybody have benchmarks for these? Anything showing there performance with Final Cut Pro?
     
  23. slughead macrumors 68040

    slughead

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2004
    #24
    I'm talking about the consumer models--more specifically, the ones that xgman was talking about. It looks, however, like the NS series are also affected somewhat.

    Like I said, I'm sure the rest of their stuff is fine. They did, however screw up their 1TB consumer drives. 30-40% fail rates seem about right from many of the reviews I've read.

    This thread is about 1TB drives, xgman stated that this specific model of seagate 1TB had a really high failure rate, and backed it up with proof. Then sidewinder instantly shot it down with this claim of expertise with no facts to back it up--simply because he saw "Seagate." Yeah, so I called fanboi.

    Sorry to threadjack, chaos. I'll shut up now :)
     
  24. sidewinder macrumors 68020

    sidewinder

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2008
    Location:
    Northern California
    #25
    slughead,

    The first mention of any Seagate 1TB drive in this thread was by pwn247 in post #3. That drive was NOT the consumer drive. Then xgman said to avoid the Seagate never saying anything about consumer versus enterprise drive. I then responded in support of the Seagate 1TB enterprise drive mentioned in post #3. Then xgman went off the reservation and talked about the consumer drives. I have been upfront and clear about the actual drive model I have been talking about all along.

    By the way, not all Seagate 1TB consumer drives had the firmware problem. In fact, it was a small percentage of the installed base. The firmware was in all new drives as of a certain build date. Yes, Seagate had a bad release of firmware. But so has every one else. Their consumer drives, with the updated firmware, are still great drives.

    S-
     

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