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First Alert today announced that its Onelink Safe & Sound, an all-in-one smoke detector, carbon monoxide detector, and speaker system, now supports AirPlay 2 for multi-room audio playback.

AirPlay? 2 enables multi-room audio playback with other ?AirPlay? 2 devices, such as the HomePod, Apple TV, and select speakers from Sonos, Bose, Bowers & Wilkins, and others. ?Users can select where the music is playing in Control Center on an iOS device or ask Siri to play music in a specific room or the whole home.

first-alert-onelink-safe-sound.jpg

Introduced at CES 2018, the Onelink Safe & Sound distinguishes itself from a traditional smoke detector with a built-in speaker and noice-canceling microphones, plus support for Amazon Alexa.

With existing HomeKit support, homeowners can add the Onelink Safe & Sound to the Home app and receive push notifications if smoke or carbon monoxide are detected. HomeKit also allows the detector and music playback to be controlled with Siri using an iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, Apple TV, or HomePod.

Regularly priced at $249.99, the Onelink Safe & Sound is currently on sale for $178.25 on Amazon in the United States.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with Amazon. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.

Article Link: First Alert's All-in-One Smoke Detector, Carbon Monoxide Detector, and Speaker Now Supports AirPlay 2
 

ArtOfWarfare

macrumors G3
Nov 26, 2007
9,097
5,039
This... sounds like a clever merging of devices.

I'm not going to pay $250 for a fancy smoke detector, but adding a smart speaker to it makes it a lot more appealing.

I wonder what else could be merged into this one device... a camera? An LED? VR Beacons (or Lighthouses or whatever the heck they're called.)
 
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Braderunner

macrumors 65816
Oct 2, 2015
1,358
3,023
Tralfamadore
For that price, you'd be better off getting a dumb smoke/CO detector and a HomePod (on sale).
That is waaaay too much for a device that should be replaced every 10 years. (Some recommend 7 years.)
Really...any AirPlay 2 speaker will sound better than this.
No. I haven't heard one of these. It's just common sense.
 
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Blizzardman

macrumors regular
Apr 7, 2010
229
338
Gilbert, Arizona
I bought one of these on the Costco black friday sale last year ($99 and it came with another normal smoke detector). I am really impressed with the sound quality considering it is coming from a smoke detector. I also like the light being available in homekit and I used it as a nightlight in my Scenes.
 
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firewood

macrumors 604
Jul 29, 2003
7,944
1,191
Silicon Valley
Is it possible to disable the Alexa microphones in these things (for use in privacy required areas), and still have them work with HomeKit and AirPlay?
 
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JRobinsonJr

macrumors 6502a
Aug 20, 2015
658
1,164
Arlington, Texas
This... sounds like a clever merging of devices.

I'm not going to pay $250 for a fancy smoke detector, but adding a smart speaker to it makes it a lot more appealing.

I wonder what else could be merged into this one device... a camera? An LED? VR Beacons (or Lighthouses or whatever the heck they're called.)

Kinda makes sense, until one of the components breaks. None of these are particularly expensive, but are a small fortune combined. Personally I won't use this type of functional consolidation. If you like it... great!
 
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neggie

macrumors member
Jul 28, 2008
30
10
Garbage. I know first hand this product is crap. I mean first of all for the price I can buy 10 smoke alarms plus a Bluetooth speaker or Alexa device. Second the app for this product is horrible no support whatsoever. Third the song quality is horrendous.And the company itself is a joke
 
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Q-Dog

macrumors 6502a
Sep 9, 2007
613
695
I don't need more cheap little speakers. What I do need is another way to interact with Siri. This thing has microphones but only talks to Alexa? Fail.

If I could talk to my Apple TV without having to pick up the remote I guess I would be good.
 
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grobik

macrumors regular
Mar 4, 2006
153
163
You can not tell Siri via Apple Watch to play music to an AirPlay speaker.
 
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GoodWheaties

macrumors 6502a
Jul 8, 2015
740
764
I like how in the picture they have it installed on the ceiling. If the carbon monoxide alarm goes off, you’re dead. I don’t understand why companies insist on putting smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms in one unit.
 
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konqerror

macrumors 68020
Dec 31, 2013
2,298
3,693
I like how in the picture they have it installed on the ceiling. If the carbon monoxide alarm goes off, you’re dead. I don’t understand why companies insist on putting smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms in one unit.

Because actual science says it's not a problem. First, look at the periodic table. CO is lighter than O2 and N2, since C is lighter than both N and O. So if anything, CO accumulates near the ceiling, not the floor.

The actual density of CO is 1.14 kg/m3 whereas air is 1.18 kg/m3 at room temperature.

In actuality, the density of CO is close enough to air that natural air currents cause a fairly even distribution anyway. In fact, O2 has a density of 1.33 kg/m3 and N2 has a density of 1.17 kg/m3, yet they don't stratify and cause us to asphyxiate when we stand on a ladder. Therefore, there is no need for a specific height to mount CO detectors.
 
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GoodWheaties

macrumors 6502a
Jul 8, 2015
740
764
Because actual science says it's not a problem. First, look at the periodic table. CO is lighter than O2 and N2, since C is lighter than both N and O. So if anything, CO accumulates near the ceiling, not the floor.

The actual density of CO is 1.14 kg/m3 whereas air is 1.18 kg/m3 at room temperature.

In actuality, the density of CO is close enough to air that natural air currents cause a fairly even distribution anyway. In fact, O2 has a density of 1.33 kg/m3 and N2 has a density of 1.17 kg/m3, yet they don't stratify and cause us to asphyxiate when we stand on a ladder. Therefore, there is no need for a specific height to mount CO detectors.
You are probably right, but it still seems like an unnecessary risk indoors where there may not be much air movement. For instance, my house doesn’t have forced air.

btw thanks for the info. It was good for me to research it again. I’ve heard all my life that it is heavier than air.
 
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[AUT] Thomas

macrumors 6502a
Mar 13, 2016
667
809
Graz [Austria]
That price tag...
I have ZigBee SmokeDetectors that double as siren for the alarm system.
CO sensor indoor is rather pointless. The only exception is if you happen to have an open fireplace or gasfired water heater.
Literally every other smart speaker will sound better than this.
...and will even be a lot cheaper and more redundant when bought separately.
 
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konqerror

macrumors 68020
Dec 31, 2013
2,298
3,693
CO sensor indoor is rather pointless. The only exception is if you happen to have an open fireplace or gasfired water heater.

Wrong. CO detectors are required by law in nearly all US states in homes that have fuel-fired appliances. 2/3 of US homes are heated by some form of gas or oil. The majority of these homes are heated by forced-air systems, if there is a crack in the heat exchanger, then CO poisoning will likely result.

 
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QuarterSwede

macrumors G3
Oct 1, 2005
9,503
1,585
Colorado Springs, CO
Because actual science says it's not a problem. First, look at the periodic table. CO is lighter than O2 and N2, since C is lighter than both N and O. So if anything, CO accumulates near the ceiling, not the floor.

The actual density of CO is 1.14 kg/m3 whereas air is 1.18 kg/m3 at room temperature.

In actuality, the density of CO is close enough to air that natural air currents cause a fairly even distribution anyway. In fact, O2 has a density of 1.33 kg/m3 and N2 has a density of 1.17 kg/m3, yet they don't stratify and cause us to asphyxiate when we stand on a ladder. Therefore, there is no need for a specific height to mount CO detectors.
This is such a common myth it pisses me off. Thank you for your simple and technical explanation of why.
 
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