First Mac Mini Benchmark Surfaces Ahead of November 7 Launch

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The first Geekbench benchmark for one of the 2018 Mac mini models has surfaced (via VentureBeat), giving us an initial look at the performance we can expect from Apple's revamped desktop machine.

The benchmarked model is a higher-end custom configuration that features a 3.2GHz 6-core 8th-generation Intel Core i7 processor, UHD Graphics 630, and 32GB RAM. At a minimum, this configuration would cost $1,699.


Two scores for the machine were uploaded today from the same user taken eight minutes apart. The first features a single-core score of 5070 and a multi-core score of 16818, while the second, which suggests much better performance, features a single-core of 5512 and a multi-core score of 23516.

The higher-end score set puts this particular Mac mini configuration right on par with the high-end 2.9GHz 2018 MacBook Pro, which earned a single-core Geekbench score of 5433 and a multi-core score of 22556. Given the price point of this Mac mini's configuration, its MacBook Pro-matching performance comes as no surprise.

The Mac mini also closely matches the 2013 Mac Pro models when it comes to multi-core performance and exceeds them when it comes to single-core performance. With the exception of the iMac Pro, it outperforms 2017 iMac models, which were not refreshed this year.

It's not clear why there's such a disparity between the two Geekbench readings, but it's possible with the first that background tasks produced a lower result, hence the retest.

We should see additional Mac mini benchmarks surfacing in the near future as the device is set to launch on November 7. Benchmarks of the base models will give us a better idea of what to expect from the lower priced versions of the device.

MacBook Air and iPad Pro benchmarks have also surfaced over the course of the week, with the iPad Pro also demonstrating MacBook Pro-class performance.

Article Link: First Mac Mini Benchmark Surfaces Ahead of November 7 Launch
 

Jack Burton

macrumors 6502a
Feb 27, 2015
632
803
I want to see cinebench numbers and performance on sustained load, like rendering for 4 or 5 hours. I wonder if the enclosure is just too small to handle that.

I'd love to throw a couple of minis in the other room as quiet render nodes.
 

SamRyouji

macrumors member
Jun 1, 2016
56
74
I want to see cinebench numbers and performance on sustained load, like rendering for 4 or 5 hours. I wonder if the enclosure is just too small to handle that.

I'd love to throw a couple of minis in the other room as quiet render nodes.
Sustained load is what it counts comes rendering or deploying tasks. If this minis still comes cool, I think this is the ultimate one monster to own. Plus side, the iconic design still complements most desks better than the current Mac Pro.
 

Artric76

macrumors newbie
Jan 11, 2018
22
16
I'm excited to see these. I've been working on a Mac Pro 2010 with 2x2.66 Xeon. It looks like the high-end one (and maybe the lower-end ones) have surpassed my processing power.

Do you think these will all-around kick my current machine's butt? Would those integrated graphics be better than my 5780 for apps that use graphics acceleration?

I feel like picking up one of these would be better than trying to upgrade this old machine. I've done a little bit and it can be tedious, not to mention running into all the things I can't do...

By the way, I'd be working with some basic things in Motion, as well as exporting DCP (uses all cores at 100%) and using Final Cut, etc.

For reference, according to Mactracker, my machine gets 16341 multi and 2430 single core performance.

My company isn't going to be buying me an iMac Pro anytime soon...
 

Appleaker

macrumors 68020
Jun 13, 2016
2,198
4,182
Will be interesting to see results for the base models.
You don't need to wait, while there are no benchmarks for the B variation of the i3, the are essentially the same mainstream desktop processors that have been on the market for almost a year, you can expect somewhere around 4500 single-core, and 14500 multi-core.
 
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cppguy

macrumors 6502a
Apr 6, 2009
534
737
SF Bay Area, California
A single benchmark is not a good indication, it doesn't tell us about the heat performance. The MacBook Pro may be almost as fast, but it it cannot sustain that speed very long, versus a proper desktop should have much better cooling. I'll just wait for the iMac CPU refresh, and proper stress testing with large FinalCut projects. A short benchmark can be very misleading, as it doesn't tell us about potential throttling.