Food, Glorious Food

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Scepticalscribe, Mar 10, 2019.

  1. arkitect macrumors 603

    arkitect

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2005
    Location:
    Bath, United Kingdom
    #151
    A perfect Easter Sunday…

    First, a three hour walk and then home to a lovely Salmon salad with a crisp Chilean Sauvignon Blanc. Chocolate and nuts for dessert. :)
    Salad - 1.jpg

    Salad - 2.jpg


    Once that jar is open there is no stopping me… *sigh* :)
     
  2. LizKat macrumors 601

    LizKat

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2004
    Location:
    Catskill Mountains
    #152
    What a gorgeous salad. I am going to copy that "real soon now".
     
  3. maxjohnson2, Apr 21, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2019

    maxjohnson2 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2017
    #153
    That is what I considered a very nice low carb salad.

    I had deep fried potatoes, deep fried beef heart, deep fried beef liver. And some of this.
     

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  4. Scepticalscribe thread starter macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
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    The Far Horizon
    #154
    Fantastic salad; my mouth is watering and I am openly salivating at the sight of it. Beautiful and - I imagine - delicious.
     
  5. Zenithal macrumors G3

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  6. Scepticalscribe thread starter macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

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    #156
    Agreed, they do.

    Yesterday, I enjoyed a dish of Hungarian goulash in a Hungarian restaurant in the Hungarian region of western Ukraine.

    Delicious.

    They also made their own cheese, and two hunks of different cheeses have since made their way into my luggage. And I managed to lay hands on genuine (Hungarian) smoked, sweet paprika.
     
  7. Scepticalscribe thread starter macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
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    #157
    On Monday, I also enjoyed an incredibly tasty homemade mushroom soup.
     
  8. EEzycade macrumors regular

    EEzycade

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2018
    Location:
    Mesa, Arizona
    #158
    A favorite dish of mine is something called Cincinnati-style chili. Those of you in the Midwest know it as skyline chili. It’s a meat sauce(beef,beans,onions) that is a little bit sweet. This goes over spaghetti and is topped with mounds of cheese and oyster crackers. It’s awesomely delicious. My mother always makes it to to celebrate birthdays or deathdays of two of my siblings. Tastes good and is made with love.
     
  9. Scepticalscribe, Apr 25, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2019

    Scepticalscribe thread starter macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

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  10. Zenithal macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #160
    Any experience with a Basque cheesecake, @arkitekt? I don't know why but YouTube has been recommending me dozens of videos over the last week. I finally gave in last night and it looks rather interesting but I'm not sure what the flavor's like. The closest I've done with a bath free cheesecake was a ricotta mixture that doesn't need the bath as it won't crack like a full cream cheese cheesecake.
     
  11. Zenithal macrumors G3

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  12. Scepticalscribe thread starter macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
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    The Far Horizon
    #162
    Anything of interest?

    Eastern and central Europe have a wonderful tradition of pickling and a Hungarian restaurant I ate in last week had enormous bottles, and jars, and demijohns full of pickled fruit and vegetables on shelves lining the walls.
     
  13. Zenithal macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #163
    Ended up experiencing nausea later, but I was searching for ideas on flavoring in terms of herbs and spices. Always had a love for pickled foods except pickled egg. Much like you I got to experience unique pickled foods during my travels into Eastern Europe. While not a true pickle in any sense, I am a massive fan of olives. I could eat a kilo of olives in a sitting if allowed to.
     
  14. Scepticalscribe, May 3, 2019
    Last edited: May 7, 2019

    Scepticalscribe thread starter macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
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    The Far Horizon
    #164
    Yes, I am a big fan of olives, myself.

    I have had amazing pickled mushrooms in Lithuania, made by a Russian who hosted me to dinner, - they were so good I could have happily spooned them straight from the jar - and the pickled salad I enjoyed last week in the Hungarian region of Ukraine was absolutely delicious (it featured lightly pickled tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, gherkins, onions, among others).

    They have terrific tradition of pickling fruit, as well.

    My sister-in-law, who is German, (and whose parents had come from the East before the Wall went up), lamented that unification had served to really undermine the old tradition of pickling (which was both time consuming and labour intensive).

    Czech colleagues said much the same to me, when I came across an amazing pantry of preserved and pickled fruit and vegetables in a Czech monastery where I stayed for a few days as a guest a decade and a half ago.
     
  15. Zenithal macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #165
    Pickled beets with onions is lovely. I was lucky to be able to communicate some, albeit my Russian then was better, and it was a "universal" language for the years following the fall of of the CCCP. There were only a few things I couldn't eat because of their texture. Some of the fruit pickles I had were of unripe fruit that were more firm, obviously.

    What was more interesting to me is the pickles meant to be firm and crunchy were just that without the use of alum powder. Even the preserved pumpkins in light syrup. I had sweet breakfast preserves and spreads made of softer vegetables. Odd if you think about it, but rather tasty.


    Waste not want not.
     
  16. Gutwrench Contributor

    Gutwrench

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    #166
    I suppose almost anything goes but how acceptable/unacceptable is serving au gratin potatoes along side pan seared salmon?
     
  17. Scepticalscribe, May 19, 2019
    Last edited: May 19, 2019

    Scepticalscribe thread starter macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

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    The Far Horizon
    #167
    Gratin potatoes go with absolutely everything in my book.

    Okay, possibly meat dishes are even better with this dish, but salmon is big enough, and bold enough to be able to take care of itself with such an accompaniment.

    However, perhaps I'd add something along the lines of a sharp green salad, or steamed spinach or chard (with butter and garlic?)

    Am preparing a Hungarian fish gulyas (goulash).

    The ingredients include: Hungarian paprika, Spanish sweet smoked paprika, caraway seeds, stock, anchovies, (for the stock), diced potatoes, green pepper, carrot, onions and garlic, along with roasted cherry tomatoes, followed - eventually - by fish.
     
  18. Scepticalscribe thread starter macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
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    The Far Horizon
    #168
    My fish gulyas - though I say so myself - was absolutely delicious.

    Actually, I absolutely love fish soups: I have made (and mastered) chowder (smoked fish gives it that amazing favour, but it is usually a mix of firm fish - both red and white, smoked fish, and shellfish) - as can be found across the British Isles, and a Scandinavian fish soup (with tomatoes, saffron or tumeric - depending on budget - and fennel), and now, Hungarian fish gulyas (goulash).

    Usually, with a fish soup, to start things off, I dissolve a tin of anchovies (diced) into an olive oil and butter mix - that gives a wonderful base for any fish soup, and a depth of umami flavour that cannot be surpassed.
     
  19. Zenithal macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #169
    Fish sauce is a good alternative. Though for a chowder, I think Blis fish sauce would be a better buy. Aged in bourbon barrels. Costs around 13 Euros. There is a Philippine fish sauce I was using at one point that wasn't too salty, but it had a spicy and citrusy kick, with an almost pure grass fed butter after taste that was fantastic on some foods. Wish I'd taken a photo of it before throwing the empty bottle out.
     
  20. Scepticalscribe thread starter macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
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    The Far Horizon
    #170
    I went through a phase of boiling the shells of prawn heads and tails in order to make fish sauce, and then straining the contents; that, along with dissolved anchovies gave me a superb fish sauce.

    These days, most of the time, I have dispensed with the shells of prawns (shrimp) - not least as my sister-in-law doesn't much care for shellfish, but I find the use of a tin of anchovies to start things off invaluable, and something that gives a wonderful depth of umami flavour to a dish.
     
  21. Scepticalscribe thread starter macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
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    The Far Horizon
    #171
    Pasta all'Amatriciana this evening; long, slow enjoyable cooking. And a very tasty dinner.
     
  22. HEALER FLAME macrumors 6502

    HEALER FLAME

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2019
    #172
    Nothing beats a smoking hot marinara crunchy pizza in winter:)
     
  23. Scepticalscribe thread starter macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
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    The Far Horizon
    #173
    Well, personally, in winter, I'd prefer roast chicken, or a good chicken casserole, (perhaps coq au vin), a rich robust goulash, or chilli con carne (I prepare a seriously one), or carbonnade beef (a Belgian beef casserole dish), or a rich fish broth, or even bolognese - which, when prepared properly, is an amazing dish.

    To my mind, pizza is more of a summer dish.
     
  24. HEALER FLAME macrumors 6502

    HEALER FLAME

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2019
    #174
    I hardly touch pizza in summer unless its just warm or cold. Pizza is my winter dish at least once a week. Also love creamy marina pasta with pesto.
     
  25. Scepticalscribe thread starter macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

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    The Far Horizon
    #175
    Reading, comparing and contrasting a number of recipes for pasta puttanesca.
     

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