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French Regulators Set to Levy Fine Against Apple for Anticompetitive Behavior

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France's competition authority is set to fine Apple next Monday for anticompetitive behavior in its distribution and sales network, reports Reuters.


Specific details about the fine and the fine amount are expected to be announced next week, and there's no word yet on just how much Apple will owe.

Apple in its October earnings call said that France's competition authority had alleged that some aspects of its sales and distribution practices were in violation of French law, but did not provide details on which aspects of its business were under investigation.
In June 2019, the French Competition Authority ("FCA") issued a report alleging that aspects of the Company's sales and distribution practices in France violate French competition law. The Company vigorously disagrees with the allegations, and a hearing of arguments was held before the FCA on October 15, 2019. The Company is awaiting the decision of the FCA, which may include a fine.
Apple earlier this year was fined 25 million euros by French consumer fraud group DGCCRF for intentionally slowing down iPhone 6, iPhone SE, and iPhone 7 models with the power management software that was meant to prevent older iPhones with degraded batteries from shutting down during times of peak power usage.

Article Link: French Regulators Set to Levy Fine Against Apple for Anticompetitive Behavior
 
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mi7chy

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Oct 24, 2014
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Wonder if it has to do with the random iCloud locking of devices purchased through secondary (pre-owned) market since those won't likely have original receipt as proof required for Apple to unlock so customers end up having to buy a new device from Apple.
 
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H2SO4

macrumors 601
Nov 4, 2008
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Wonder if it has to do with the random iCloud locking of devices purchased through secondary (pre-owned) market since those won't likely have original receipt as proof required for Apple to unlock so customers end up having to buy a new device from Apple.
Dunno. I do think Apple are anti competitive though.
The Appstore is a great example.
iOS apps especially. For Mac apps, I ALWAYS buy the non App Store version.
 
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Alan Wynn

macrumors 65816
Sep 13, 2017
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Dunno. I do think Apple are anti competitive though.
The Appstore is a great example.

Funny, I think the App Store is a great example of competition at work. Consumers have two choices Apple’s walled garden and Android’s free for all.

iOS apps especially. For Mac apps, I ALWAYS buy the non App Store version.

On the other hand, I always try to buy the Mac App Store version. I like to be able to download it to any Mac I own and take advantage of family sharing for those apps that support it. Such a better experience than having to create credentials on every store for every product, worrying not just about their product, but their processes for keeping my information safe, etc.

Another great competitive choice!
 
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mi7chy

macrumors 604
Oct 24, 2014
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I'm glad Apple is finally getting nailed for including Safari with their OS!

Including Safari and making it the default is one thing but making it so it's only updatable through iOS/iPadOS updates and not independently through app store then gimping 3rd party browsers is evil design for obsolescence.
 
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69Mustang

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Funny, I think the App Store is a great example of competition at work. Consumers have two choices Apple’s walled garden and Android’s free for all.
The problem with your answer is it completely misses the point. Consumers who want iOS don't have two choices. Practically speaking, they only have one. Now whether or not one thinks Apple's actions regarding the App Store warrant oversight and a fine... different matter altogether. The App Store has no competition. It is a one stop shop for anyone seeking iOS apps.

Last I checked, Android apps don't work on iOS devices so it's not an alternative. Yes, I am aware of checkra1n exploit demo'd by Corellium, but there's nothing practical about that.
 
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Seoras

macrumors 6502a
Oct 25, 2007
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Scotsman in New Zealand
I just don't get this hatred of Apple's walled garden and locked app store. Before the age of the smart phone we were in the age of the PCs which were crippled with virus protection software, constantly needing updates that slowed down even the fastest of machines.
A walled garden, with an App store that requires developers to follow rules and go through a review process, makes for a system that doesn't need bloatware security from a 3rd party.
I do ALL my banking now on my iPhone because I trust it.
Damn sure I wouldn't do it on an Android. "But, but I have to have root access to MY smart phone, because it is MINE!"
Good for you...
 
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abhibeckert

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Jun 2, 2007
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Cairns, Australia
Last I checked, Android apps don't work on iOS devices so it's not an alternative.
Mac apps don’t work on Windows and nobody was ever fined over that. You can’t play blue ray movies on a DVD player either.

Walled gardens in computing have been around forever - try selling a game for nintendo hardware without going through them for example. It’s perfectly legal.

Why would phones be any different?

This would be something else - I expect it has to do with hardware sales and the terms of some contract Apple makes everyone sign.
 
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k1121j

macrumors 6502a
Mar 28, 2009
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New Hampshire
Wonder if it has to do with the random iCloud locking of devices purchased through secondary (pre-owned) market since those won't likely have original receipt as proof required for Apple to unlock so customers end up having to buy a new device from Apple.

Not sure its random as you may think. People are not removing the device from iCloud & resetting the phone then re-activating it and sending it to the purchaser at the start of the setup process then the next time its deleted (restored from factory) its locked to the original iCloud account. In this case you can blame the third party for not making sure the cloud was removed from the original iCloud account it was tied to.
 
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mi7chy

macrumors 604
Oct 24, 2014
7,294
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Not sure its random as you may think. People are not removing the device from iCloud & resetting the phone then re-activating it and sending it to the purchaser at the start of the setup process then the next time its deleted (restored from factory) its locked to the original iCloud account. In this case you can blame the third party for not making sure the cloud was removed from the original iCloud account it was tied to.

I call BS. If the device is iCloud locked the new owner wouldn't be able to sign in to begin with. In the cases I've seen the devices have been in use for several months to half a year at the same residence/broadband, they randomly iCloud lock and Apple won't unlock if gifted without receipt.
 
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2010mini

macrumors 601
Jun 19, 2013
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Wonder if it has to do with the random iCloud locking of devices purchased through secondary (pre-owned) market since those won't likely have original receipt as proof required for Apple to unlock so customers end up having to buy a new device from Apple.

I’ve purchased numerous secondhand iPhones and never experienced iCloud locking..... why would that happen if the device is unlocked when you buy it?
 
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69Mustang

macrumors 604
Jan 7, 2014
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In between a rock and a hard place
Mac apps don’t work on Windows and nobody was ever fined over that.
Seems like you're misunderstanding the topic. Android apps not working on iOS devices is irrelevant. No one would be fined over Mac apps because they can be acquired from multiple sources: Mac App Store, direct from developer, and software retailers... both online and brick and mortar.

Walled gardens in computing have been around forever - try selling a game for nintendo hardware without going through them for example. It’s perfectly legal.
Same here. Nintendo games aren't an issue because they can be acquired from Nintendo and multiple other vendors.

Why would phones be any different?
Phones in general aren't different. The iPhone environment is though. That may be where the French take issue with Apple: The fact that iOS apps can only be acquired from 1 vendor in 1 app store where the vendor controls it's apps along with all the other apps. Is the vendor running it's store fairly? The French seem to indicate they don't think so.
 
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Metrosey

macrumors 6502
Oct 18, 2019
390
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I'm glad Apple is finally getting nailed for including Safari with their OS!

Not sure if this is a joke, I'll continue anyway. So when I install Microsoft Windows 10 on my PC, I get Microsoft Edge, Windows Store, Windows File Explorer, Cortana, Calculator, Microsoft News, etc. Does that mean Microsoft are being anti-competitive too? If so, aren't most companies then being anti-competitive?
 
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CarlJ

macrumors 603
Feb 23, 2004
5,275
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San Diego, CA, USA
Consumers who want iOS don't have two choices. Practically speaking, they only have one. Now whether or not one thinks Apple's actions regarding the App Store warrant oversight and a fine... different matter altogether. The App Store has no competition. It is a one stop shop for anyone seeking iOS apps.

Last I checked, Android apps don't work on iOS devices so it's not an alternative.
It's the "who want iOS" part though. iOS, and Apple hardware, and Apple's App Store are a package deal. If you choose an electric car, you can't go into a gas station and sue them for not putting more "go" in your car. And you can't go into McDonalds and order but then insist, "no, I want the fries to be from Burger King". They're not available separately, and it would be unreasonable to compel the companies involved to cater to your desires simply because you want it. Somebody wanting something does not automatically lead to companies being required to provide that to them.

So the consumers who want iOS do have two choices: they can choose to get an iPhone/iPad with the OS they desire, and accept the ecosystem that comes with it, or they can choose to forego iOS and get an Android device because although they want iOS, they more highly desire the "increased freedom" of the Android ecosystem. It's their choice. And "iOS but with a different app store" is not one of the available choices. Just because they can't have the thing they most want doesn't mean they don't have choices, only that they aren't satisfied with the choices that are available. They could always start their own smartphone company and have everything exactly the way they want.

I'd like to have an electric car that you don't have to plug in for numerous hours, but can instead recharge instantly at a wide variety of locations. Who do I sue or fine about getting that right now? Because I really want it, so I ought to be allowed to have it.
 
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