GarageBand doesn't follow Apple's HIG

Discussion in 'macOS' started by Dj64Mk7, Feb 23, 2017.

  1. Dj64Mk7 macrumors 6502a

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    #1
    GarageBand uses "Cancel" and "OK" where it would be much more appropriate to use buttons like "Save", "Undo", and "Delete." I thought this went against Apple's HIG (Using "OK" instead of a more descriptive button name)?
     
  2. casperes1996 macrumors 65816

    casperes1996

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    #2
    Oh it does, but it's far, far from the first time Apple has broken their own design rules.
     
  3. Dj64Mk7 thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #3
    I'm curious to hear/see other examples.
     
  4. casperes1996 macrumors 65816

    casperes1996

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    #4
    The same thing with buttons has been there in a few versions of iTunes, though as I can recall right now, it's OK in the latest version. Then there's the Remote app, which has always been a bit of a mess. If you open an iTunes Library with it on the iPad (not sure about iPhone), the design is still that of the pre-Yosemite days, destroying the feeling of it all being a cohesive ecosystem. Then there's the WWDC app. Again, I think it's fixed now, but at some point there was a search button both at the bottom and at the top at the same time.
     
  5. Dj64Mk7 thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    Oh, like in the "Get Info" window in iTunes?
     
  6. casperes1996 macrumors 65816

    casperes1996

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    #6
    Wasn't what I was thinking of actually, but there may be things in there too. I was thinking of some of the pop up messages - like if you go to buy a song on iTunes, there was a version where the "Buy" button simply said "OK". Though I think that was a beta version.
     
  7. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #7
    Agreed, Apple has in the past not adhered to its own guidelines.

    I mean in some apps, you close the main window the app closes, in others the app remains even after the window was closed. While I enjoy a nicely designed user experience, is not completely consistent.
     
  8. casperes1996 macrumors 65816

    casperes1996

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    #8
    Yeah. Though I feel like for the most part they do well in this respect. Most their apps stay open when the windows are closed and for those that don't it more often than not feel logical, in that the application window was the only logical way of interacting with the app, whereas me closing all windows to Safari, might still mean I want to interact with Safari, like opening a new window, but just wanting the other ones gone or what do I know. But agreed it's not consistent.
     
  9. KALLT, Feb 25, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2017

    KALLT macrumors 601

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    Sep 23, 2008
    #9
    The HIG have no single rule that states when applications should quit. The guideline is: if the application cannot do anything sensible for the user when the main window is closed, then it should quit. Closing the last window is just one possible reason why an application should quit, but not the only one. Safari should not quit, because the user might want to open another window. System Preferences should quit, because the main window is the sole functionality of the application. Activity Monitor should not quit despite having just one main window, because the user might want to leave the program running so that it can gather statistics over a period of time.

    There are obviously some edge cases. Mail, for instance, should probably quit, because the user can assume that it will fetch new emails in the background just like Contacts and Calendar do. It does not, because Apple has not built Mail that way. On the other hand, Mail should stay open, because the user might want to compose another email quickly. iTunes should probably quit, but then the user cannot use the play controls on the keyboard anymore. It is a balancing act between user expectations and functionality.

    There are of course many examples where Apple actually flaunted the guidelines. The new app designs in iOS 10 for instance are a concurrent example. On the Mac, it was particularly annoying with iTunes in the past. Even the aesthetics: they had this really odd, bright gradient in the toolbar at some point, rather than the flat grey colour. In one version they even placed the window buttons vertically. They used these blue–grey, opaque scrollbar handles instead of the ‘lickable’ toothpaste ones. These were so omnipresent there that many people here actually thought that Apple would change the Aqua design itself to match them, and called it ‘marble theme’.
    iTunesWindows.jpg
    itunes-10-vertical-buttons.jpg
     
  10. Dj64Mk7 thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #10
    What do you mean by "Apple flaunted the guidelines [with] the new app designs in iOS 10"?
     

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