(Hackintosh) Miscellanies questions

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by MacDude21, Dec 23, 2013.

  1. MacDude21, Dec 23, 2013
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2013

    MacDude21 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2013
    #1
    Okay, I'm planning on building a Hackintosh but I want to know some things first.
    My first question is: when there's an update and you want to install it, will you have to wipe your hard drive every time?
    My second question is: It hackintosh very stable?
    Third question: Is hackintosh legal in USA?
    Last question: IF I just throw together a mATX computer( http://www.tonymacx86.com/393-building-customac-buyer-s-guide-october-2013.html#budget ) will it work and everything will be fine?
     
  2. nzalog macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2012
    #2
    So updates can be a hassle, the way I worked with updates was making working backups of the hackintosh before updates. A majority of the time update will install and have some small problems, sometimes you may not boot, and sometimes everything works without issues. It really varies. By having a backup drive, you can clone everything with a utility like carbon copy cloner. You make your backup, try the update, if it break something you have a working copy that you can use to troubleshoot or clone back to older version.

    So no, you don't reinstall each time.

    Picking the correct hardware will make it stable and is very important in a hackintosh (check the link below)... I've had some rock solid builds that works almost like a full Mac.

    I don't know about the legalities so maybe someone else can explain. I think as long as your are not using this to make a profit then you should be OK.

    Awesome Hackintosh resource: http://www.tonymacx86.com/home.php

    Keep in mind, this is not the easiest thing to do. If you like to tinker with stuff it can be fun.
     
  3. MacDude21 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 6, 2013
    #3
    Thanks, I intend to buy a backup drive, and do love tinkering with things.
    Btw, I have added another question
     
  4. gnasher729 macrumors P6

    gnasher729

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    #4
    Short answer: No.

    Long answer: Apple won't do anything unless you claim publicly that it is legal, and loud enough so they have to do something about it and can't ignore it.
     
  5. nzalog macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2012
    #5
    It's not that simple, those builds just help to make sure that most your hardware works without going out and installing custom drivers (.kext) or worse yet buying unsupported hardware. It is also tested configurations that work with the software provided on the site. I'd honestly take your questions to tonymac8x6's forums as it's all they do there is hackintoshes. They usually have a step by step build process for the hardware that is recommended as well. Good luck!
     
  6. MacDude21 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 6, 2013
    #6
    If it's illegal why hasn't tonymacx86 gotten sued?
     
  7. old-wiz macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2008
    Location:
    West Suburban Boston Ma
    #7
    Tonymacx86 doesn't sell anything.

    "illegal" is a slippery term. A hackintosh is a violation of EULA, an agreement. If you were to start building and advertising and selling, then Apple would have your a** for lunch. You can argue whether its "illegal" or not until the cows come home. Also the question of the EULA is different in different countries.

    the various hackintosh sites don't bother Apple much - they are not selling anything so Apple doesn't sue. I'm sure that Apple's legal team keeps an eye on them.

    if I was younger and interested in fooling around with computers, but now I don't have the interest. Now days I just buy a computer and use it.
     
  8. triplelucky macrumors regular

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    Sep 30, 2012
    Location:
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    #8
    Unless your just looking for a time consuming hobby.. why not just get a “real” Mac?
     
  9. westrock2000 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2013
    #9
    Apple has some pretty frustrating policies when it comes to buying their software. The upside is that their software is very relaxed when it comes to control mechanisms.

    So I feel like Apple does that to get you hooked. Then hope that you buy into eco-system.

    I bought my Mac-Pro the week Mavericks went live on the store, and I can tell you it is very hard for me to find programs on the App store now. I wanted to buy iLife from Apple and even iPhoto specifically. Because there are versions that are an upgrade for me, but still lower then the current versions. You can't. Apple won't sell it to you. However, if you can find it, there are no control mechanisms to prevent you from installing it.
     
  10. ELMI0001 macrumors 6502

    ELMI0001

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    Olympic Hills GC
    #10
    Because if you have the time you can build a machine far more powerful and upgradable than anything Apple puts out there.

    Except the nMP but $3k is not everyone's budget.
     
  11. blueroom macrumors 603

    blueroom

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    #11
    At the cost of incompatibility, stability & reliability.
     
  12. ELMI0001 macrumors 6502

    ELMI0001

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    #12
    Speaking from experience?
     
  13. blueroom macrumors 603

    blueroom

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    #13
    Yes.
     
  14. ELMI0001 macrumors 6502

    ELMI0001

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    #14
    Care to elaborate?
     
  15. MacDude21 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 6, 2013
    #15
    unfortunately, I'm not rich. But I love gaming and OSX and need a really good, decent priced computer. Macs are very expensive especially if you consider the specs. Hackintosh, however, has OSX AND is cheap. In fact, hackintosh is $80 cheaper than Windows. It gives me a bang for my buck and doesn't make me have to learn a new, operating system-- especially one I don't like. I would switch to Linux if it had at least decent compatibility, but since it doesn't, I want to use OSX. Sure OSX is less compatible than windows, but it's compatible enough for me, and there are ports and software to run windows apps on your mac.
     
  16. r0k macrumors 68040

    r0k

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2008
    Location:
    Detroit
    #16
    Another option to consider is a used or refurb Mac. Stick to 2012 or later models if you can afford them. I don't recommend any of the air series of devices because they are not user-upgradeable. Good choices include Mac minis, Macbook Pros and used Mac Pros. I recommend buying from Apple directly or an Apple reseller like Microcenter, Best Buy or Frys. For instance, Microcenter routinely offers about $100 off the 13 inch Macbook Pro. This is actually competitive with Apple's education pricing and you don't have to prove anything to buy one.

    If you are dead set on building a hackintosh, be sure to stick with the EXACT configurations specified on tonymac86 or insanelymac and be sure to build and test everything BEFORE the return policy expires on the components you used. I have a friend who owned an older iMac and decided to build a hackintosh for himself. He couldn't get it working and bought a copy of Windows 7 and moved on. I couldn't help thinking of of one of those kitten dies memes. :(
    [​IMG]
     
  17. MacDude21 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 6, 2013
    #17
    I simply cannot afford a mac with gaming specs. But thanks for the advice, I also plan to purchase NewEgg's 1-year warranty on the really expensive components, since it's like $9 to have warranty on a $250 item. Also, I will be following the exact components from TonyMac, mostly the mid-end choices for the mATX.
     
  18. r0k macrumors 68040

    r0k

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2008
    Location:
    Detroit
    #18
    Persistence is key. If at first you don't succeed, don't run out and get Ubuntu or Windows. I think there's nothing at all wrong with using a Hackintosh to "hold you over" until you are able to get a real Mac. Just keep in mind that a large part of the value of a Mac is that you don't have to spend any time dealing with drivers, etc. I think you will spend a fair amount of time in kext land and if that doesn't bother you, then by all means enjoy your new Hackintosh.

    I was in MC the other night in a LONG return line. I was taking back my Archer C7 router to spend more and get an Asus AC66 router. I'm delighted with my choice because my Asus can run Tomato or DD-wrt if I want to. Another guy in line was bringing back a motherboard that he had bought at a discount because it was a return. I suggested to him that he pay a little extra to get one that was new in box without the seal broken so at least he would know it works. He seemed competent and indeed had tested everything with his old mobo and the new mobo and it all worked with the old mobo and not the new mobo. This tends to suggest the mobo he was returning in line with me was defective. Let's say he saved $20 over the new mobo. He was now spending 45 minutes in the Christmas return line. He had now burned up gas driving to MC twice for one mobo. In hindsight, I think he would have been happier spending more up front for a known working mobo.

    You mention Newegg. I've never found them to be that much better than MC to make it worth dealing with mail order. After all, if one of your parts doesn't work, you will be dealing with getting an RMA number and dropping it off at a UPS store. This is why I never buy certain things from Amazon, Newegg or Monoprice no matter how good the deal looks. The 45 minutes I spent in MC is nothing compared to waiting 4 or 5 days for UPS to return an RMA part then waiting another 4 or 5 days waiting for the replacement to arrive. Heck by then I could have poured molten silicon and made my own, well it feels that way anyway. Let us know how it works out for you.
     
  19. VI™ macrumors 6502a

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    Aug 27, 2010
    Location:
    Shepherdsturd, WV
    #19
    My biggest two issues were getting sound to work and the display drivers since Apple never had a GTX 295 in any of it's computers. Every update that included either driver would break my install.
     
  20. blueroom macrumors 603

    blueroom

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    Feb 15, 2009
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    #20
    Then run Windows 7, why bother with all the hassle trying to build a kludge.
     
  21. Cougarcat macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2003
    #21
    As long as you stick to supported parts, maintaining a Hackintosh is relatively straightforward after it's all set up. The only extra thing you need to do routinely is re-apply a sound patch after point updates.

    I would love for Apple to release an xMac for $1,000-1500 with PCI slots and a consumer CPU, but that's never going to happen.
     
  22. MacDude21 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 6, 2013
    #22
    This isn't just to "hold me over", but rather to be my main computer for 4-6 years, given that I will upgrade it
    I'm not asking weather I should get a hackintosh. I'm asking questions.
     

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