Hardmac article on water indicator

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by cdinca, Jul 17, 2009.

  1. cdinca macrumors 6502

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    #1
  2. -aggie- macrumors P6

    -aggie-

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    #2
    Great post, even if it has been posted before. Those were the first clear shots I've seen of the indicators. Also, it was interesting to see that humidity can set them off, which is contrary to what Apple says. If it hasn't been posted before, I vote POTD.
     
  3. abijnk macrumors 68040

    abijnk

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    #3
    Yeah, and that is why those little things are utterly useless. One Southern Illinois summer and the thing is going to be pink pink pink.
     
  4. aprofetto macrumors 6502a

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  5. toxictrix macrumors 6502a

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    It is too bad Apple does not care. They probably like it. They get to cancel hundreds of warranties.
     
  6. -aggie- macrumors P6

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    And here I've been defending Apple when people come on the forums whining how they never had their phone in water and it must be the humidity.
     
  7. samcraig macrumors P6

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    I don't think PINK should indicate an issue. I think bright red is definitely something Apple can argue

    Unfortunately - there hasn't been an actual test to see how long a dot would need to be in heavy humidity to turn that same shade of red.

    If (and I'm throwing out a random time here) it's a year or even 9 months - before it turns red, I think it's somewhat valid to then still consider it water damage. If a device is being consistantly used in an environment above and beyond the intended use (just like temperature ranges on ALL electronic devices) - it's legitimate for Apple to say - hey - your indicator is read - so either you've submerged it or you've had it in extreme conditions for long enough it's turned red. Prolonged exposure to humidity COULD affect electronics with condensation occuring inside.

    If, however - the pink turns to red within a month, then that's another story. Fact is - no one here really knows (and I'm not defending Apple per se) how long exposure to humidity would affect the internal components - if at all - or to what degree.

    So I don't begrudge Apple in protecting themselves. But obviously it should examined and tested.

    Just having pink should NOT void the warranty.
     
  8. macfanboy macrumors 6502a

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    #8
    *shoots OP* :cool: just for fun. it wasn't posted

    good article though
     
  9. cdinca thread starter macrumors 6502

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    but it turns pink in 7 days at 95% RH which is within apple's specs. So, if it turns red anytime in the first year, at 95% RH, I think that is unfair.
     
  10. samcraig macrumors P6

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    I dunno.. again it depends on how long it would actually take to turn red. Like I wrote -it is entirely feasible (not saying it would or would not happen - just that it's possible) that long time exposure to humidity COULD damage the electronics. I've seen blackberries, cameras, ipods, PSPs, Calculators, etc all have condensation issues when faced with humidity (clouding and droplets) - so it's not unreasonable to think that extensive exposure over time to these elements could cause a problem with the electronics - the equivelant to water getting into them.

    Again - it all hinges on a) how long it takes to turn red and b) what damage/if any might occur from the humidity
     
  11. -aggie- macrumors P6

    -aggie-

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    The point here is that Apple states that humidity will not cause the water indicators to indicate water damage.

    You can go on and on about what humidity does or does not do, but clearly Apple needs to change their policy if humidity activates the sensors.
     
  12. samcraig macrumors P6

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    I agree. I think I said that in my first post, didn't I? PINK shouldn't nullify the warranty and it should be stated clearly for applecare/stores/att/etc
     
  13. abijnk macrumors 68040

    abijnk

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    #13
    QFT.

    Apple has a right to protect their interest, but they also have an obligation to the customer to be honest with their products. I'd be interested in seeing more in depth research on this. I wonder if laypeople (i.e. you or me) can just order these things...
     
  14. -aggie- macrumors P6

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    According to Apple: "A triggered indicator will turn red or pink, as shown in the examples below, indicating that the module(s) to which the indicator is attached has been exposed to liquid." So, yes, you said PINK shouldn't nullify the warranty, but then you went on to say how humidity "might" affect the electronics and they'd be withing their rights to nullify the warranty. Apple states humidity will not affect the sensors. As Abiyng87 states, Apple needs to upfront with their customers. Since, the OP's tests seem to show humidity affects the sensors they need to change the policy or tell us that we better get cases that are water resistant if we live in Houston or DC. What Apple needs to also do is show us how these sensors are not going to be affected by humidity IMO. They can refute the OP's tests, since for all we know they are bogus. Anyway, from what we know at this point, PINK nullifies the warranty and PINK is caused by humidity and Apple states humidity will not cause the sensors to activate.
     
  15. thisisarcadia macrumors 6502

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    #15
    Wow that bizarre the measures they take to put all the sensors in. I wonder why they do that!
     
  16. Conflagrare macrumors newbie

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    #16
    Are you people on crack?

    Are you people on crack, or can you not read?

    The indicators trigger only with direct contact to a liquid. The indicators will not be triggered by temperature and humidity that is within the product's environmental requirements described by Apple. A triggered indicator will turn red or pink, as shown in the examples below, indicating that the module(s) to which the indicator is attached has been exposed to liquid.​

    Apple has the right to not honor the warranty if the product has been put in an environment that's out of their specified humidity requirements.
     
  17. cdinca thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #17
    Did YOU not read it?

    That is what apple says, but the company that makes the sensors says humidity will trigger it to turn pink.
     
  18. samcraig macrumors P6

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    #18

    I said AFTER pink turns to red. And we'd need further tests to show how long/what exposure to humidity it would take to get there. I'm pretty sure I wrote that.

    PINK shouldn't nullify. Red should. The question I'm raising is - how long at pink does it take to get to red with JUST humidity....
     
  19. -aggie- macrumors P6

    -aggie-

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    RTFT.
     
  20. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    #20
    It things like this that would make me fill no guilt about replacing/ painting them white because clearly apple does not want to suck it up and admit that the water sensor they use are faulty and do not work with in apple spec range.
     
  21. HarrisonB macrumors 6502

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    #21
    glhf with that.
     
  22. Agent 21 macrumors regular

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    #22
    Great, humidity triggers it, makes me pretty much screwed if I ever have a problem and need my phone fixed. I GARUNTEE mine will be "tripped", I live in friggin HAWAI'I and travel almost 8 months out of the year to tropical locations for surf trips/contests. My sensor is doomed lol.
     
  23. danpass macrumors 68020

    danpass

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    #23
    Like Earth!


    Get's pretty humid in Florida .....
     
  24. alFR macrumors 68020

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    Unfortunately the original article fails to mention the fact that while the 3M tests they describe are carried out at 95% RH, they are also at 55 degrees C:

    [​IMG]

    That's well outside the iPhone's recommended operating temperature range (max 45C) and gives no evidence at all that 95% RH will change the sensor colour at temperatures within the recommended operating range. Move along, nothing to see here...
     
  25. matttye macrumors 601

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    #25
    Yes.. but one of apple's environmental guidelines says "Relative humidity: 5% to 95% noncondensing" .. therefore if condensation is caused by humidity, you are using it outside of apple's guidelines.
     

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