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clg82

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 17, 2010
365
193
Southern California
Hello everyone, I am pretty much set on purchasing a 2015 MacBook Pro (refurb) from Apple after reading all of the horrific stories I've been reading about the current 2017 models (keyboard issues etc). So my question is with every new iteration of MacOS that comes out in the future will it be compatible with the 2015 model MacBook pro? I know with iPhones the older the phone gets the more issues you have with newer iOS's and was just curious if this was the same for the MacOS and older MacBook pros? I plan on keeping it for a few years as I have read that the longevity on these laptops are incredible. thanks for any help!
 

SteveJUAE

macrumors 601
Aug 14, 2015
4,470
4,711
Land of Smiles
Chances are you won't be able to update your OS after 5 or 6 years and any laptop is a risk after 3 years but odds on you should fare better with a 2015 model as repairs should be less costly than current ones
 

nouveau_redneck

macrumors 6502a
Sep 16, 2017
551
867
MacOS High Sierra is compatible with MBP models 2010 and newer. Given the release year of 2017, that is roughly 7 years of backward model support. So if the release schedules stay roughly constant, that would give you until the MacOS release in 2022 to be on the compatibility list.

Of course there is no way to predict disruptive technology changes or other future factors which could alter that projection either way.

I say get the Mid 2015 model with the specs you like and enjoy years worth of excellent machine. It is still an awesome machine deserving serious attention.
 
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The Game 161

macrumors Nehalem
Dec 15, 2010
30,578
19,781
UK
Hello everyone, I am pretty much set on purchasing a 2015 MacBook Pro (refurb) from Apple after reading all of the horrific stories I've been reading about the current 2017 models (keyboard issues etc). So my question is with every new iteration of MacOS that comes out in the future will it be compatible with the 2015 model MacBook pro? I know with iPhones the older the phone gets the more issues you have with newer iOS's and was just curious if this was the same for the MacOS and older MacBook pros? I plan on keeping it for a few years as I have read that the longevity on these laptops are incredible. thanks for any help!
Honestly If you are to get a new laptop I would buy brand new and then it will last you even longer. My macbook pro 2017 with TB has been flawless.
 
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nouveau_redneck

macrumors 6502a
Sep 16, 2017
551
867
Chances are you won't be able to update your OS after 5 or 6 years and any laptop is a risk after 3 years but odds on you should fare better with a 2015 model as repairs should be less costly than current ones

What is the risk that occurs at 3 years? If its no longer being able to purchase Apple Care, I don't personally see that as a risk.
 

SteveJUAE

macrumors 601
Aug 14, 2015
4,470
4,711
Land of Smiles
What is the risk that occurs at 3 years? If its no longer being able to purchase Apple Care, I don't personally see that as a risk.

Nothing to do with AC

Apple fare better than most for first 2 years and no better than others like for like after. The longer you keep any laptop the greater the risk of something going wrong eventually.

If Apple were more reliable than others there would be no need for AC and they would come with a longer warranty

The new MBP due to build method expose you to a potential greater repair cost than previous generations

You would hope that with any premium build laptop you should stand a better chance with some components lasting longer, but there is no guarantee. The latest gen MBP has only just over a year of data to view even CR take over 2 years to report on reliability.
 

whg

macrumors regular
Aug 2, 2012
235
153
Switzerland
Hello everyone, I am pretty much set on purchasing a 2015 MacBook Pro (refurb) from Apple after reading all of the horrific stories I've been reading about the current 2017 models (keyboard issues etc). So my question is with every new iteration of MacOS that comes out in the future will it be compatible with the 2015 model MacBook pro? I know with iPhones the older the phone gets the more issues you have with newer iOS's and was just curious if this was the same for the MacOS and older MacBook pros? I plan on keeping it for a few years as I have read that the longevity on these laptops are incredible. thanks for any help!
I told my experience in another thread:
https://forums.macrumors.com/thread...e-mac-my-main-platform.2095010/#post-25596907
My conclusion is this: Today I would get a 2017 model. If you can wait for next yeas's models, chances are high that you will be forced to High Sierra and later with the new APFS file system. From my other post, you will see that I still need Windows, and the Windows installed in the Bootcamp partition saved my a$$ recently. With APFS this would not have been possible, as there are currently now Windows drivers for it.
 

ZapNZs

macrumors 68020
Jan 23, 2017
2,310
1,158
The 2015 will presumably have support for it dropped earlier than the 2017. However, when which generations are dropped is not entirely consistent, and some older systems have received support much longer than others (some of this appears to be influenced by how long Apple sells a particular model in the refurb store.)

For at least an OS generation or two after Apple does drop support, you will likely continue to receive security updates and most modern software will be able to run on it without issues. For example, it's only now that some Software Makers are beginning to drop support for El Capitan (2 OS gens ago), and many are still supporting it.
 

SteveJUAE

macrumors 601
Aug 14, 2015
4,470
4,711
Land of Smiles
The 2015 will presumably have support for it dropped earlier than the 2017. However, when which generations are dropped is not entirely consistent, and some older systems have received support much longer than others (some of this appears to be influenced by how long Apple sells a particular model in the refurb store.)

For at least an OS generation or two after Apple does drop support, you will likely continue to receive security updates and most modern software will be able to run on it without issues. For example, it's only now that some Software Makers are beginning to drop support for El Capitan (2 OS gens ago), and many are still supporting it.
Hers a nice table I found with examples:

support-mac.png


It's the odd little things that catch you out, my in-laws who have a graveyard of our old mac's were caught out recently with an innocent upgrade of skype that would not work on an old MBA.

Additionally most batteries soon start to fade off after 3 years, whilst no issues for my in-laws as they do not use the portability other than from kitchen to lounge. For their usage it's cheaper to buy a new simple laptop than replace batteries on an old mac
 
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parseckadet

macrumors 65816
Dec 13, 2010
1,490
1,270
Denver, CO
Chances are you won't be able to update your OS after 5 or 6 years and any laptop is a risk after 3 years but odds on you should fare better with a 2015 model as repairs should be less costly than current ones
That is just plain wrong. I'm running High Sierra on my early 2011 MBP, and it's compatible with the 2010s as well. Earlier machines were dropped primarily because they had 32 bit CPUs I believe. I see no reason why Apple won't continue to support those machines next year. The only reason I'm replacing it at this point is because the I/O is so painfully slow by today's standards.
I told my experience in another thread:
https://forums.macrumors.com/thread...e-mac-my-main-platform.2095010/#post-25596907
My conclusion is this: Today I would get a 2017 model. If you can wait for next yeas's models, chances are high that you will be forced to High Sierra and later with the new APFS file system. From my other post, you will see that I still need Windows, and the Windows installed in the Bootcamp partition saved my a$$ recently. With APFS this would not have been possible, as there are currently now Windows drivers for it.
I don't think this is correct. It may be that new machines will come pre-formatted to APFS, but it will likely be possible to reformat them to HFS+ and reinstall MacOS. Apple is going to continue to support HFS+ for a long time still, and your issues with accessing APFS from Bootcamp are a perfect example of why.
 

SteveJUAE

macrumors 601
Aug 14, 2015
4,470
4,711
Land of Smiles
That is just plain wrong. I'm running High Sierra on my early 2011 MBP, and it's compatible with the 2010s as well. Earlier machines were dropped primarily because they had 32 bit CPUs I believe. I see no reason why Apple won't continue to support those machines next year. The only reason I'm replacing it at this point is because the I/O is so painfully slow by today's standards.
It's not wrong the OP is considering buying a 2015 MBP so in 5 or 6 years time it would be over 8 years old :rolleyes:

macOS High Sierra will run happily on a late 2009 or later MacBook or iMac, or a 2010 or later MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, Mac mini or Mac Pro. If you've got an older machine than that, the Mac App Store simply won't let you install the upgrade file.

That's an 7-8 year limit currently and no guarantee all apps etc will function
 

parseckadet

macrumors 65816
Dec 13, 2010
1,490
1,270
Denver, CO
It's not wrong the OP is considering buying a 2015 MBP so in 5 or 6 years time it would be over 8 years old :rolleyes:

macOS High Sierra will run happily on a late 2009 or later MacBook or iMac, or a 2010 or later MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, Mac mini or Mac Pro. If you've got an older machine than that, the Mac App Store simply won't let you install the upgrade file.

That's an 7-8 year limit currently and no guarantee all apps etc will function
The point I was trying to make is that Apple doesn't stop supporting hardware just because it's old. They do so because they're trying to make architecture changes that the old hardware will not be compatible with. Those 2009 models used Core 2 Duo processors and needed discrete graphics cards. There's no similar transition on the horizon.

Further, realize that Apple actually STILL sells the 2015 MBP new, mainly for institutional buyers. Apple doesn't declare a product to be "vintage" until 5 years after the date they stop selling it. So that clock hasn't even started ticking yet.
 

clg82

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 17, 2010
365
193
Southern California
thank you very much for the replies everyone, i decided to go with a macbook pro refurbished that was "originally realeased 2016" so hopefully they have swapped out the keyboard to the 2017 version that everyone likes more......how can i tell if it has the newer style keyboard as opposed to the older that everyone was having issues with?
 

jerryk

macrumors 604
Nov 3, 2011
7,418
4,207
SF Bay Area
thank you very much for the replies everyone, i decided to go with a macbook pro refurbished that was "originally realeased 2016" so hopefully they have swapped out the keyboard to the 2017 version that everyone likes more......how can i tell if it has the newer style keyboard as opposed to the older that everyone was having issues with?

I doubt they will have swapped the keyboard. Refurbished means tested and performs as new, aka as it did in 2016. Nothing more.
 

clg82

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 17, 2010
365
193
Southern California
I doubt they will have swapped the keyboard. Refurbished means tested and performs as new, aka as it did in 2016. Nothing more.
so there's no way to tell the difference between the 2017 or 2016 keyboard? i thought i had read somewhere that there may be a symbol above the CTRL key on the newer ones....any truth to that?
 

Eric Rathhaus

macrumors newbie
Dec 14, 2017
16
9
I don't have any technical expertise to impart. But I do try to follow this rule: buy the least expensive machine that serves your needs now. Using this philosophy, you buy at a steep discount since the price of tech is always falling. You might end up upgrading more often, but with the time value of money you still come out ahead.
 

SteveJUAE

macrumors 601
Aug 14, 2015
4,470
4,711
Land of Smiles
The point I was trying to make is that Apple doesn't stop supporting hardware just because it's old. They do so because they're trying to make architecture changes that the old hardware will not be compatible with. Those 2009 models used Core 2 Duo processors and needed discrete graphics cards. There's no similar transition on the horizon.

Further, realize that Apple actually STILL sells the 2015 MBP new, mainly for institutional buyers. Apple doesn't declare a product to be "vintage" until 5 years after the date they stop selling it. So that clock hasn't even started ticking yet.
Sorry you need to read Apple Vintage and obsolete products page they discontinue service etc based on age no other reason

https://support.apple.com/en-gb/HT201624

I have snipped out some country exceptions for briefness:

Vintage products are those that have not been manufactured for more than 5 and less than 7 years ago. Apple has discontinued hardware service for vintage products with the following exceptions (snip)

Obsolete products are those that were discontinued more than 7 years ago. Monster-branded Beats products are considered obsolete regardless of when they were purchased. Apple has discontinued all hardware service for obsolete products with no exceptions. Service providers cannot order parts for obsolete products. All Apple Retail Stores and the Canadian, European, Latin American, and Asia-Pacific operating regions follow the U.S. product list, but make no distinction between vintage and obsolete. When applied to Apple Retail Stores and these operating regions, products on the U.S. vintage list (all models) are considered obsolete.
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thank you very much for the replies everyone, i decided to go with a macbook pro refurbished that was "originally realeased 2016" so hopefully they have swapped out the keyboard to the 2017 version that everyone likes more......how can i tell if it has the newer style keyboard as opposed to the older that everyone was having issues with?
Congrats :)

Just make sure it's still eligible for AC. I doubt it will have the newer 2017 KB and if it's any help our 2015 rMB's KB which were 1st gen of the new design KB's are still working with no issues
 
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whg

macrumors regular
Aug 2, 2012
235
153
Switzerland
I don't have any technical expertise to impart. But I do try to follow this rule: buy the least expensive machine that serves your needs now. Using this philosophy, you buy at a steep discount since the price of tech is always falling. You might end up upgrading more often, but with the time value of money you still come out ahead.
I need a full day to install everything I need on my work notebook, not counting the hassle to reinstall copy protected software, which often results in buying a new license just because I want to keep the old notebook as a backup. For the money lost in one day I could easily buy a more expensive upgraded notebook, especially with a higher capacity SSD. Therefore my rule deviates from yours: buy the best machine you can afford ;)
 

PBG4 Dude

macrumors 601
Jul 6, 2007
4,329
4,578
so there's no way to tell the difference between the 2017 or 2016 keyboard? i thought i had read somewhere that there may be a symbol above the CTRL key on the newer ones....any truth to that?
The 2017 MBP keyboard has new symbols on the CTRL and OPT keys.
 

Fishrrman

macrumors Penryn
Feb 20, 2009
28,751
12,860
OP:

If you want a 2015 MBPro, then GET a 2015 MBPro.
Run whatever version of the OS will run on it, and stop worrying about future unknowns you can't control.

My 2015 MBPro came with El Capitan, and it will probably STAY on El Cap for the next 3-4 years. Perhaps its entire "working life". I prefer stability to "latest and greatest".

I keep an old 2010 MBPro around that still has Snow Leopard on it. That, too, still runs fine for most things...
 

Brammy

macrumors 68000
Sep 17, 2008
1,718
690
I think Apple shutting off OS support for Macs is more based on the chip architecture than the age. For MacBooks and Pros, it seems it's more the Core/Core Duo chipsets not having OS support. Are there any I5/7 models that can't run High Sierra? That's different, obviously, from general service. It would be nice if that chart above had the chipsets.

I know older bluetooth chipsets won't work with continuity etc.

I would get the 2016/2017 model anyway. I think you will take longer for them to feel slow compared to the 2015.
 
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