Highest Temperature a MacBook Pro case can handle

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Jonze, Feb 14, 2012.

  1. Jonze macrumors member

    Jonze

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    #1
    I am looking to get a MacBook Pro case galvanized but they have instructed that it will be heated to 180 degrees. Can it withstand this temperature?
     
  2. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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    #2
    Well the melting point of aluminum is around 660 C, so I'd say you're fine.
     
  3. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #3
    The CPU throttles down/shuts down when it reaches 90 degrees (Celsius). Personally, I'd not let it get that close. While the CPU is rated to handle temps up to that point, the other components may not.

    I don't like my MBP getting into the 80s and manually increase the fan speed to lower the temps when I see that occurring
     
  4. negativzero macrumors 6502

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    Jul 19, 2011
    #4
    The CPU can go up to 105C. Not sure about the other components though. But usually these kinds of procedures they should strip the MacBook to the bare metal so I don't think you have much to worry about.
     
  5. snaky69 macrumors 603

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    Mar 14, 2008
    #5
    Is that F or C?

    Either way it's aluminum(most likely 6061-T6 or 7005-T6), I doubt a mere 180 degrees(in either scale) will damage it.

    ----------

    That's 105C, not 90C for shutting down, by the way.


    Did any of you two actually read the first post?
     
  6. maril1111 macrumors 68000

    maril1111

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    #6
    You should be fine.
     
  7. Jonze thread starter macrumors member

    Jonze

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    #7
    I will obviously taking everything out of the case, having it done then re-building it.

    Thank you everyone for your quick replies :)

    The reason I am doing this is I like the look of the colorware stuff but I ain't paying $2250 for it.
     
  8. dusk007 macrumors 68040

    dusk007

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    #8
    That's what I thought. Why do people post without even reading the first post?
    I guess they aren't actual people but just bots planted here by Apple.
     
  9. maril1111 macrumors 68000

    maril1111

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    #9
    Nice guess but i think its simply because they wan't to increase their post count.
     
  10. HellDiverUK macrumors 6502

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    Belfast, UK
    #10
    Way to not read the OP's question properly. I doubt he'll be running the machine while getting the case galvanised. :rolleyes:

    FAIL.
     
  11. snaky69 macrumors 603

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    #11
    Like that matters any, they aren't even displayed haha.
     
  12. nikhsub1 macrumors 68000

    nikhsub1

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  13. thundersteele macrumors 68030

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    #13
    It's 100 C for the sandy bridge i5/i7 CPUs. At 95 C it's supposed to start thermal throttling, but there is no official documentation on this. The 100 C TJunction are from the intel website, and, as far as I understand, denotes the temperature at which the CPU shuts down.
     
  14. GGJstudios, Feb 15, 2012
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2012

    GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #14
    The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C, GPU Tjmax = 100C on i3, i5, i7 processors. (Source: Intel)
    Core2Duos had CPU Tjmax of 100C. Yes, shut down should occur if Tjmax is reached. Throttling is usually 5 degrees below that.
    Exactly what method do they plan on using? If hot-dip galvanizing, the temp will be around 860 °F (460 °C). Typically, galvanizing is usually applied to steel more than aluminum. What are you trying to accomplish?
     
  15. bdodds1985 macrumors 6502a

    bdodds1985

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    #15
    Is that to prevent rust? I'm not sure all the trouble would be worth it. Can you explain to me the process? and will it have an abnormal look to it?

    Just from a quick research on galvanization, I am wondering if the aluminum body is really that susceptible to rust, or where you are located that you would even think about doing such an extensive process?
     
  16. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #16
    Aluminum doesn't rust. It can oxidize, but not rust.
     
  17. Zwhaler macrumors 603

    Zwhaler

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    #17
    The highest my CPU hit (2010 MacBook Pro 2.66 i7) was 219F or 104.9 C. The case was burning hot under the CPU. That's the most heat I've ever seen it produce, yet it runs fine.
     
  18. snaky69 macrumors 603

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    #18
    Did you even read the first post?
     
  19. JacaByte macrumors 6502

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    #19
    In layman's terms, oxidization = rusting. In chemistry we avoid the term "rust," but it's effectively the same thing.
     
  20. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #20
    No, it's not quite the same at all. For one thing, aluminum oxide does't flake off like rust does. Therefore the process of oxidizing stops as soon as the hard layer of Al2O3 is formed. Iron oxide flakes off, exposing more bare iron, continuing the rusting process, which is the oxidation of iron. Rust continues to rust and weaken iron. Oxidation on aluminum protects it from further deterioration.
     
  21. chordate68 macrumors regular

    chordate68

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    #21
    No, he was right. Rust is just a non-scientific term for describing iron oxides or corrosion You could say that aluminum doesn't corrode like iron does.
     
  22. GGJstudios, Feb 15, 2012
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2012

    GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #22
    No, he wasn't. Rust is iron oxide, which is not ever present in aluminum. Aluminum also naturally resists corrosion, unlike iron. They are dissimilar, both in terms of the metals involved, but also in terms of their characteristics. Mis-labeling something and calling it "layman's terms" is not accurate. I can say an alarm clock is just a layman's term for an automobile. That doesn't make it true.

    Benefits of Aluminum
     
  23. richarddwyer10 macrumors newbie

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  24. bdodds1985 macrumors 6502a

    bdodds1985

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    #24
    That is what I thought. It seems like an pointless task to me. if you are worried about rust and had the money to spend on a MBP, why not get something plastic or build a hackintosh? the whole process to me is like defacing the MBP, which is one thing i give apple credit for, making it look so smooth. But to each they're own, some people just use cases or stickers.

    I've never gone out of my way to avoid the term "rust" either. layman's term: stuff rusts. Rust, short for Oxidation of iron metal, and a general term for describing iron oxides. pfft... chemists. One reason why I loathe "The Big Bang Theory" :rolleyes:
     
  25. mrsir2009 macrumors 604

    mrsir2009

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    Sep 17, 2009
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #25
    Nope, my MacBook Pro has gotten up to 103C :) It can get to about 105C before it shuts off:

    Source: http://www.squidoo.com/how-to-prevent-your-mac-from-overheating
     

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