Hot to the touch

Discussion in 'MacBook Air' started by andbnew, Jul 23, 2012.

  1. andbnew macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2012
    #1
    My Mac Air, purchased in March of 2012, is very hot when I touch the area slightly to the left and above the esc key --- the problem extends to the very edge of the machine just above the connector for the power adapter.

    Is this normal?
     
  2. Moshe1010 macrumors 6502a

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  3. Barna Biro macrumors 6502a

    Barna Biro

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    Luzern, Switzerland
    #3
    Why would you want to touch that region?
    To answer your question: it's normal, ignore it...
     
  4. andbnew thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Jul 23, 2012
    #4
    Yes..the INcase...but it does not cover any part of the area that is hot
     
  5. mrs1986 macrumors regular

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    Apr 21, 2011
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    Uruguay
    #5
    "When" is the right question..... What are you doing in your air at the time is "hot" to the touch??
     
  6. andbnew thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Jul 23, 2012
    #6
    I touch that area as a few fingers of my left hand naturally rest there when I'm reading web content
     
  7. Barna Biro macrumors 6502a

    Barna Biro

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    #7
    Hmm, that's a quite unusual place to rest your hand... Anyway, Macs heat up because the aluminium body is like a large heat sink. Also, since the fans are quite close to that area, it's quite normal for it to heat up more than other regions. Again, it's normal... if I were you, I'd work on resting my hand somewhere else :)
     
  8. andbnew thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Jul 23, 2012
    #8
    Thanks for the info.....as long as several forum members say that the heat is normal, that's good enough for me!
     
  9. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #9
    Quite normal. The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C (221F), GPU Tjmax = 100C (212F) on i3, i5, i7 processors. (Source: Intel) If you're not already using it, iStat Pro will give you accurate readings of your temps and fan speeds, among other things.

    Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.

    It is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.

    Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis). iMacs have 3 fans with minimum speeds in the 800-1200 range. They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level. If they're spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC. (PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help.)

    The intake and exhaust vents are in the back of the computer near the hinge on all Mac notebooks (except the new MBP with retina display, which has intake vents along the sides at the bottom). The iMac vent is a slot on the back near the top of the computer. Make sure the vents remain unblocked to allow your computer to perform at its best.

    Learn about the fans in your Mac
    Apple Portables: Operating temperature

    For Flash-related issues:
     
  10. mortenandersen macrumors 6502

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    Apr 9, 2011
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    Norway
    #10
    Incredible advice!

    This is one of the most incredible "advices" I ever have come across, and it also ignores the basic problem and question in a most arrogant and stupid way. Is such an advice a symptom of fanboyism?!

    It is better to keep with the truth and fact: The poster's Air machine is simply becoming too hot for normal use. Apple's product is not good enough.

    Is this so difficult to acknowledge, that denial and such "advices" become necessary?
     
  11. halledise macrumors 65816

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    Hamilton Island, Whitsundays, QLD Australia
    #11
    not normal :(
     
  12. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #12
    No it is not. Read my earlier post and educate yourself.
     
  13. Barna Biro macrumors 6502a

    Barna Biro

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    #13
    @mortenandersen: For a more detailed explanation, read what GGJstudios has posted.

    I'm not a fanboy, but obsessing over a bit of heat in a region that doesn't have much to do with "normal usage" is not healthy. As already mentioned, the aluminium body is like a large heat sink, it heats up more and of course the top region will get hot since the fans are also there and they are kinda blowing at the screen at one point in time + the charger, etc...

    You want to keep it cool? Try using it while sitting in a fridge...
     
  14. andbnew thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Jul 23, 2012
    #14
    Didn't mean to start an argument over this....My Mac Air is not too hot to use...performs very well to my satisfaction....was just wondering why that particular part of the machine is so warm to to the touch!

    Thanks to all!
     
  15. mortenandersen macrumors 6502

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    Norway
    #15
    So having a very hot machine is defined as "normal"?!

    That is useful to know: Those who have "educated" themselves in this Apple universe prefer or at least tolerate very hot products or also products that have a fan noise that is far too loud, as many other posters have written about?

    Useful to know. But, of course, we all have different standards and prefer different temperatures and sounds...
     
  16. theSeb macrumors 604

    theSeb

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    Aug 10, 2010
    Location:
    Poole, England
    #16
    Nothing to worry about. That particular part warms up on all portable Macs. What kind of web content are you reading? Is it flash heavy? Flash adverts? I would recommend a plug in to disable flash. This will keep the temperatures down slightly and you won't have to deal with filthy and annoying flash adverts.
     
  17. Barna Biro macrumors 6502a

    Barna Biro

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    Sep 25, 2011
    Location:
    Luzern, Switzerland
    #17
    Are you ill? Who said the entire machine is hot ?!
    The OP was asking if it's normal that the top-left region is more hot than the rest...
    That of course is considered as "NORMAL" !
    Either live with it or buy / use something else...
     
  18. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #18
    Yes, it is normal, if it's an Apple notebook with an aluminum body.
    As has been common knowledge for many years, Apple notebooks made of aluminum are frequently hotter to the touch than notebooks made of other materials. This in no way indicates unsafe or unacceptable operating temperatures, despite what a user's preferences may be. If a user finds such temperatures unacceptable for their use, they are free to buy a different brand of computer.
     
  19. theSeb macrumors 604

    theSeb

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    #19
    Of course we have different standards. Since you have obviously never used a portable Mac, it's time to educate yourself. Go into an Apple store and feel the top left corner just above the esc key. Having said that, I've never experienced a portable computer that was cool everywhere and I've used a lot of them from all of the major manufacturers.
     
  20. mortenandersen macrumors 6502

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    Apr 9, 2011
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    Norway
    #20
    I agree, but there may be a problem

    I agree. Of course some parts of the machine may be warmer than others and that must be tolerated within reasonable limits.

    My main concern is, however, that the rather extreme eagerness with regard to make the machine as THIN as can be, may lead to problems of heat, and there should not, IMO, be such a great point (anymore, as the machines are already sooo thin) of making Airs so thin that the thinness creates heat problems.
     
  21. stchman macrumors 6502a

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    Jul 16, 2012
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    #21
    I've used my MBA for several hours with no "hot to the touch" at all. The bottom can get slightly warm, but not uncomfortable to the touch.
     
  22. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #22
    The heat doesn't create problems. It functions just fine, despite being warmer to the touch than some users may prefer.
     
  23. theSeb macrumors 604

    theSeb

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    Location:
    Poole, England
    #23
    I can appreciate your concern, but I have to say that my 2011 MBA i7 is cooler to touch during the same use in comparison to my fatter 2009 13" MBP. The old 13" MBP was actually somewhat uncomfortable to type on in apps like Xcode when using the upper left corner keys from around the Tab to the E key and upwards so things are much improved in this regard. I've been pushing my little MBA quite hard for a year now and I don't have any reliability problems.

    ----------

    We have different tolerances on what is too hot and what isn't. I, for example, don't like washing my hair with water that most people find perfectly normal. I grew up in South Africa where summer temperatures of 35-40 degrees Celsius were not uncommon, but I am not a big fan of hot water on my skin.
     
  24. stchman macrumors 6502a

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    St. Louis, MO
    #24
    I grew up here in the central US where summer temperatures routinely reach 105F.
     
  25. isrefel macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2012
    #25
    This is normal. Don't worry about it. Obvious advice is just don't leave it running on a blanket or other surface that doesn't dissipate heat well. Pretty standard for any laptop.

    There is no heat 'problem', as other users might suggest. Laptops get warm, theres really no avoiding that.
     

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