How closely does your mental age tie to you physical condition?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Huntn, Jan 16, 2017.

  1. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #1
    Related to the What's Your Mental Age? thread, for discussion, how much is your mental age tied directly to your physical age, hormones, health, and condition? We view old people as being set in their ways and don't like to do a lot. Let's pretend that a miracle drug unlocked the cell reproduction cycle allowing people to maintain a 20 year old like body for 100 years, with a total lifespan of 400 years. How do you think these people would act on their 100th birthday- youthful and energetic or old, want to stay at home type people?

    I think you'd act as young as you feel, but I could see possible mental issues assiciated with an extended life for some people. And I imagine some 100 year old people might become less tolerant and set in their ways too, but physically, there would nothing holding them back.
     
  2. mobilehaathi macrumors G3

    mobilehaathi

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    #2
    I think you're taking this "mental age" thing far too seriously.
     
  3. Huntn thread starter macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #3
  4. Apple fanboy macrumors P6

    Apple fanboy

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    #4
    I think there are other factors at play. My Great Grandfather rarely left the house after his wife dies (although was in reasonable health for a good decade afterwards). He lived another 30 years in total.

    I like to stay at home mostly because I'm an introvert. Nothing to do with my health or mental age.
    --- Post Merged, Jan 16, 2017 ---
    I'll pass thanks...
     
  5. Huntn thread starter macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #5
    I agree that being introverted could extend over your entire life span.

    But in this thread, I was trying link physiological changes to changes in way the way people act as they get older, which I believe is accepted. I believe this is the primary reason for the change.

    Now if the extension of life mentioned in the article I linked to, just tacks 25 years onto the end of your life without extending the youthful part of your life, that does not excite me that much. :)
     
  6. mobilehaathi macrumors G3

    mobilehaathi

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    #6
    I think your general topic is fairly interesting, and if it grew out of that silly online quiz, great! I just wouldn't rely on the lame conceit of the quiz to frame your topic.
     
  7. ardchoille50 macrumors 68020

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    #7
    Biologically, I am 53 years old. I really don't know what "age" my physical body is but I'm sure it's much younger. I engage in weight training 6 days per week and run ~1 mile every day. I've no medical problems, not on any medications, I weigh 150 pounds and my blood pressure is 112/80 - having a medical education, the previous information tells me that I'm in excellent shape for my biological age.

    My favorite quote: "There will come a day when I can no longer do this. Today is not that day."

    Update: I remember reading a recent article describing a 105 year old French man setting a new cycling record. It is my opinion that age is just a number.
     
  8. Scepticalscribe, Jan 16, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2017

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #8
    But why would you want to expand the Lifespan of humans? Without the means - economic and financial and - at that, a guaranteed and secure (inflation proofed) income - to support these supposedly indolent lifestyles in societies that prioritise youth, - and economic disposability, expendability, what is the point?

    Personally, I would never have any wish to return to the youthful part of my life - I'm far more comfortable in curmudgeonly middle age.

    Again, personally, I would only ever want to live life to a venerable old age of several centuries if I had my mental faculties intact, my financial status exceedingly comfortable, and my health reasonably good.

    However, if - like any other people - older people are respected, and encouraged to remain mentally active, engaged, challenged - there is no reason whatsoever that they would wish to remove themselves form the word unless they were naturally introverted.
     
  9. Huntn, Jan 16, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2017

    Huntn thread starter macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #9
    Your question is valid. It would require an overhaul of society with possibly an appropriate reduction in biological reproductive freedoms. As to Why? Without putting much thought into it, the idea is appealing, especially if money can be made (not referencing myself) and some people want to live forever.

    I for one, am not thrilled with older life, 20 more years is doable, but I sincerely dislike the slow slide, physically and mentally. If another 25% of life is added means being an old codger for another 20 years, that does not really excite me. However if 25% can be added to your young adult/middle aged life, this might be very appealing, such as... ;)

    The Honor Harrington series I've been reading features a product called prolong which extends the young adult portion of the human lifespan for a total lifespan of 200-300 years. Besides the society restructuring required, with the caveat of a wealthy civilization, where most citizens benefit, and no negative health consequences, I could easily imagine it being embraced by humans. :)

    My original question was what primarily causes elderly people to act elderly? I think the answer is mostly physiologically while recognizing that if you interacted intellectually with a 60 year old in a 20 year old body, it might be quite different experience than with a real 20 year old.
     
  10. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #10
    There is no fun in being old and poor.

    (Mind you, there is not much fun in being young and poor).

    And this fetish of being young is, I think, the province of those who had a great time when they were young.

    Personally, I value the perspective, judgment, and comfort & ease in one's skin, and casual confidence that have come with a bit of......maturity. Sod youthful skin and bundles of boundless energy. Other things matter more.

    I'd never willingly return to my teens - or even early twenties - in this life, the next life, or the one following that.

    Why on earth would one want to live forever?
     
  11. Zenithal macrumors 68040

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    #11
    My GP has stated that I have the body health of someone much younger. Physically I feel better these days than I did when I was much younger. Much agree with Ard here. Elderly who keep physically fit, and by that I mean cycling or running, live much longer and more active lives than those of the same age who've decided to rest most of the day. These people also maintain a higher degree of joint movement and lean mass as opposed to fat mass and ailing joints. Genetics also plays a small role.
     
  12. AngerDanger macrumors 68030

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    #12
    Ironically, I could see an increase in lifespan also increasing one's "mental age." I'm in my early twenties and have, at most, 60 to 70 years left. How much more would I weigh the outcomes of my actions if my expected lifespan were increased to 400 years? I'd have 379 solar sweeps left, and any mistake I'd make now could rob me of far more time than it would currently (what an awkward sentence). As one's lifespan approaches infinity, the value and impact of any given action may increase similarly.
     
  13. Huntn thread starter macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #13
    I agree with you, but at this point I'm involved in a philosophical discussion. :)

    But you would not be a teen again. The scenario I'm describing, you'd be XX (for argument sake: 60) with the body you had when you were 20, you'd still have all the wisdom, accumulated knowledge, and would be very comfortable with your physical self, but you could be out playing racket ball or running marathons if you so desired. Win, win. ;)
     
  14. Septembersrain Contributor

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    #14
    I think too many factors are at play. Lifestyle, personality, health, location, etc.

    For me, my health and personality place me at an older age. However, if I hadn't experienced my health crisis my personality would still be leaning more towards extrovert. I'm an ambivert and had always been more outgoing. Once my heart condition made me bedridden, I became more introverted.

    Who's to say if I'll stay leaning into the introverted spectrum or if I'll go back to being more extroverted?

    I also don't want to expand my lifespan. I feel like when it's my time, I'm going to go. I just hope I go either painlessly or I go out before I even know what hit me.
     
  15. chown33 macrumors 604

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    #15
    I'm wondering about the arithmetic here. What are you proposing for the remaining 300 years? Is it a slow decline after 100 years, or a sudden drop? When is the sudden drop" Where is "middle age"?

    What about injuries? Do we have to put up with them for centuries, or is repair medicine as advanced as longevity medicine?

    And that's not even getting into the economics: do people stay in the work force for 300 years, and then retire for the last century, or is this a post-scarcity socio-economic system, like in, say, Star Trek? In other words, is it necessary to work for a significant time in order to build up the capital and resource stream one needs to start doing as one pleases, or does that start from the beginning?


    I know some 60+'ers who backpack, dance, swim, and cycle. And they're pretty good at it, too. No one of them does all those things, but each does enjoy what they do. I also know some 35'ers who do none of those things, are in rough physical shape, and generally act resigned to their sad fate.
     
  16. Huntn, Jan 16, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2017

    Huntn thread starter macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #16
    It can be anything you want! :) You've seen Sci Fi movies, repairs would be easy. ;)
     
  17. ardchoille50 macrumors 68020

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    #17
    I think attitude and determination have a lot to do with this. There was recently an 84 year old woman who completed the Boston Marathon in just under 5 hours. If she can do it, I can do it.
     
  18. Huntn thread starter macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #18
    That's right, by virtue of being that old, but for the purposes of my example you would maintain your physiological youth including mental facilities. However, if you consider the title of this thread, I'm putting forth an idea that physiological aging is primarily responsible for the elderly acting elderly.
     
  19. chown33 macrumors 604

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    #19
    Then I have an enormous lawn, and you should get off it, before I release the grass kraken cybernetic ponies robot lawnmowers.
     
  20. AngerDanger macrumors 68030

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    #20
    I'm saying even a young mind would be forced to be more cautious (perhaps adding apparent maturity thus increasing mental age) because dying in, say, a skydiving mishap at age 20, while expecting to live 380 more years, would be the current equivalent of dying at age four.
     
  21. Huntn thread starter macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #21
    This is by no means a norm, but an exception. I ran in my youth through age 55, but my knees and back are shot. No marathons for me or most 60 year olds.
     
  22. Scepticalscribe, Jan 16, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2017

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #22
    Look: If you are from the upper classes, have had good health, decent professional status, regular (and reliable) income, autonomy in your world, your work, your life, financial security, professional respect, personal happiness - of course you can run marathons in your 90s.

    These surveys are always - or often - run glibly without any awareness whatsoever of social or economic or political context or how power plays out in life (in terms of class, colour, ethnicity, gender, location, country), and fall prey to the usual American drivel of assuming that one's fate lies (entirely) within one's own hands.

    Let us put it this way: I doubt many women in Somalia, or the Congo, or Pakistan, or Saudi Arabia - will be running marathons in their 90s, with supple skin and lissom limbs.

    Likewise, I very much doubt many black men in the US from lower class backgrounds will be fit of life and limb - let alone free (prison statistics are an absolute disgrace) and-or capable of running marathons......after - let us say, 40, let alone 90.

    The only thing I liked about that body was the endless energy I seemed to have; these days, I still have impressive endurance - if not quite endless energy - and I would still willingly trade that energy for the casual comfort, judgment, and confidence and ease in my skin - (ever so slightly sagging) I have now.
     
  23. Huntn, Jan 16, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2017

    Huntn thread starter macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #23
    Agreed. If you had 60 years under your belt, you would not be acting like a 20 year old, but you could keep up with a 20 year old. I think this would drastically change the outlook of a 60 year old for better or worse depending on your perspective. But again, the focus of this thread is the notion that mental age is greatly related to physiological condition. However, for the example, I would imagine a 60 year old, when it comes to "mental age" , things such a caution or wisdom, or preferred activities, would mostly register quite differently than a 20 year old. :)

    I could imagine 60 year olds hooking up with 20 year olds, but I could also see there being age based personality conflicts between the 2 groups. I imagine some people could make it work.
     
  24. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #24
    And I would turn that on its head, by arguing that physiological condition is greatly related to mental age - and mental health, physically, psychologically and - indeed - intellectually.

    In this thread there is this mad silly focus on the physical: My experience is that a great many adults are mentally - and intellectually - profoundly lazy, and padlock their brains after the age of - say - 18 - in some cases, terrified lest an unwelcome or unfamiliar thought trespass those well guarded precincts.
     
  25. AngerDanger macrumors 68030

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    #25
    I feel compelled to share the trailer for a film that touches on a few issues raised in this thread. It's for "The Man From Earth," which, as the trailer boasts, was penned by writer of the "most acclaimed episodes of Star Trek and The Twilight Zone," Jerome Bixby. There is little action (it's conducive to contemplation) and the acting is… well, terrible but doesn't detract from the overall quality.



    Not that that already happens or anything… :p
     

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