How do you prefer to read?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by HE15MAN, Jun 28, 2013.

  1. HE15MAN macrumors 6502a

    HE15MAN

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    #1
    I havent read much in the last few years, and have 8-10 books I would like to read, but I cannot make up my mind as to which format is better, ebook or hardcover.

    Ebooks pros: portability, environment, ease of access and purchase, can read at night
    Ebooks cons: cannot share, more expensive than used books,

    Hardcover pros: easy to share, low used cost
    Hardcover cons: portability, space they take up, cant read at night, environment
     
  2. SandboxGeneral Moderator

    SandboxGeneral

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    #2
    I prefer to read on the Kindle Paperwhite and once in a while the iPad. While I still enjoy a good paperback and hardcover, I don't read many that way anymore. If they could get the nice paper book smell into the Kindle and iPad, they may have something there!
     
  3. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #3
    Personally, I am an avid reader, and love books. Friends and my brother have been advising me to get a kindle, as I currently live and work on an environment where browsing in bookshops is an utter impossibility, a sad loss, as there are few more pleasant places to while away an afternoon than in a well-stocked, rambling, welcoming bookshop.

    Re actually reading, of course I read material online, mostly reports, and articles. However, reading a book (to me) is a different sort of reading; to be able to lose yourself in a book requires - to me - the physical presence of something you can curl up with.

    Actually, from a sheer physical perspective, I much prefer reading a sheet of paper to a computer screen, and far, far prefer reading a book to scrolling down a computer screen. It is not that I will not do the latter, especially if there is no choice, but I much prefer the former, and find it easier on my eyes.

    Besides, each format seems to give rise to is a different type of reading. I find I don't read as deeply if I am reading from a screen, instead, I read more rapidly, skimming and extracting what I need from the text, whereas I will actually savour a book, (or a really well written article, especially if I encounter it in hard copy form).

    I'll add to that that I have worked as an editor, and, bizarrely, it is much easier to pick up on errors, and spot mistakes, when reading from a hard copy; I blush to recall the typos that slipped under the radar when I was rapidly reading a screen.
     
  4. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

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  5. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

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    #5
    So conventional....
     
  6. chown33 macrumors 604

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    Aug 9, 2009
    #6
    There's old-school boustrophedonic.
    .tfird ym teg uoy fI
     
  7. notjustjay macrumors 603

    notjustjay

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    Canada, eh?
    #7
    I'm torn.

    There is something to be said about a good old-fashioned paper book in a comfortable chair by the fireplace. Plus all you said about lending, buying used books, and they just look cool on a nice big bookshelf.

    But a Kindle is a very nice device and I use it all the time for reading in bed or in places like the car or on a plane where I will put down the book often. Having the Kindle keep your place for you sounds trivial but it is incredibly handy.

    I do both. For classics I expect to read a lot (Lord of the Rings, Narnia, etc.) I buy paper books for sure.
     
  8. Plutonius macrumors 603

    Plutonius

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    Feb 22, 2003
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    #8
    With my eyes open :).

    I have a Kindle (highly recommend it) but most of my reading by far is on my iPod Touch. My Touch is always with me and it's pretty good for reading. I use the Kindle app and it will automatically sync up my books between my Kindle and Touch (i.e. I can read books on one and it will put me on the correct page when I switch to the other).
     
  9. eternlgladiator macrumors 68000

    eternlgladiator

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    #9
    I never have a problem reading on my ipad or iphone. The screen doesn't hurt my eyes as long as I'm not in the sun and it's washed out. I can handle any level of dark but adjust the brightness or inversion. Way better because I can bring my library with and read anywhere. Especially office number two.
     
  10. firedept macrumors 603

    firedept

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    #10
    Old school. Prefer reading hardcover books. Just like the feel and weight of the hardcover in my hands. Besides they look so much better on book shelves that Ebooks.
     
  11. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    The Misty Mountains
    #11
    The latest book I am reading is a fat paperback with print so small I found that I was not looking forward to reading it. I broke down and purchased the ebook version of it- War of Honor and now I'm happily reading it. :)
     
  12. 0dev macrumors 68040

    0dev

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    #12
    Generally if it's a book I really like, I will try to get a physical copy, but I do most of my casual reading on my tablet purely out of convenience.
     
  13. ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

    ucfgrad93

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    #13
    I do all my reading on my Kindle Keyboard. It is light weight, the battery lasts for up to 3 weeks, reading in sunlight is no problem, can get a new book in 30 seconds.
     
  14. DUCKofD3ATH Suspended

    DUCKofD3ATH

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    #14
    I used to read books made out of paper, but since I spend my days staring at a computer screen, I've taken up listening to audiobooks.

    Fortunately the iPod revolution happened at the same time, so I always have several dozen audiobooks in my player ready for when I have time to kill.
     
  15. HE15MAN thread starter macrumors 6502a

    HE15MAN

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  16. Plutonius macrumors 603

    Plutonius

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    #16
    I usually get mine on iTunes. Most public libraries also have a fairly good selection.
     
  17. SandboxGeneral Moderator

    SandboxGeneral

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    #17
    audible.com is a very popular place to get them too.
     
  18. kazmac macrumors 601

    kazmac

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    #18
    I've gone back to hard copy

    I prefer reading from books. After years of reading school textbooks and/or historical research based books, I am finally reading fiction again.

    I ditched digital, just not a good reading experience for me.
     
  19. Sister Owl macrumors member

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    Mar 23, 2013
    #19
    It depends on where you live I guess. I definitely prefer ebooks, they way cheaper even than used paper books, and as for books in English – they are, well, available. For example, recently I have bought this book in iBooks store just for 10 bucks. I can't imagine where in my town I could get it in paper for 10 bucks, even used. Shipping from Amazon or ebay would cost more! And offline I couldn't find the book anywhere for any price to begin with…
    So, ebooks only for books in English.
    As for Russian books, I also prefer ebooks because iPad mini is lighter and smaller than any book. For travel it's crucial, and I read books mostly in travel or public transport.
     
  20. malman89 macrumors 68000

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    May 29, 2011
    Location:
    Michigan
    #20
    Physical books. Only and always.

    The only exception were the second and third Hunger Games books during their peak popularity. Check out waiting list was weeks long, so just downloaded free PDFs and read them that way. Not the most enjoyable format.
     
  21. smithrh macrumors 68020

    smithrh

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    #21
    I may be in the minority here - but I don't think listening to audiobooks constitutes "reading."

    Very different parts of the brain are used. You can also pause after reading something, even go back a word, paragraph or page - but an audiobook keeps going on.

    Jus' sayin'.
     
  22. ijohn.8.80 macrumors 65816

    ijohn.8.80

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    Location:
    Adelaide, Oztwaylya.
    #22
    I bought an iPad with the express purpose of reading ebooks. Never could get used to it, it always took me way longer than reading from paper and I would end up with slightly weepy eyes too. Sold it and bought a good lens for my camera! Happy days! :rolleyes:
     
  23. Hastings101 macrumors 68000

    Hastings101

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    #23
    I prefer to read on my Kindle. I like being able to adjust the font, leave notes, etc. all while using something pretty similar looking to paper and without the backlit LCD/whatever screens burning into my eyes (especially at night).
     
  24. EmaDaCuz macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2012
    #24
    Hard to say.
    How I read: Kindle.
    How I prefer to read: physical book.

    I am not an avid reader, but I love the book as an object. I like the feel of the paper, its smell and I love the cover. A good cover can turn a decent book into an instant classic :eek:

    But, eventually, I had to move to digital books. I move quite a lot for work, changing country every 2-3 years and bringing tons of books with me is simply impossible. The Kindle is a great toy, very light, good font rendering and it feels almost like the real stuff. Almost. A plastic box with a screen will never replace the smell and the grain of the paper.
     
  25. Scepticalscribe, Jun 30, 2013
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2013

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #25
    I agree, and beautifully written post.

    In fact, it is not just the feel of a book cover that I love, (and I do love hard backs to read, their ageless solidity, but loathe their weight when moving, or travelling), the smell of the paper (especially thick, almost parchment style paper, rich in the hand), and the experience of sitting down to immerse yourself in a book.....

    Actually, I well remember shipping boxes and crates of books - and loading suitcase after suitcase - from country to country in my travels. One may wince at the cost, but we each have pleasures that fire one internally, and one of mine is reading, which means that I love the sheer physicality of a good book. More recently, many (but not all) books are off-loaded to friends (and colleagues) who remain in situ when I depart from a strange, challenging foreign location. Indeed, even in my current location, I find that my books are quietly breeding; there will be a fight for shelf space with the coffee pot in due course.

    I love a well crafted book, one that is well written, but also one which the publisher has thought to pour resources into, where the cover art, quality of paper, font used, and sheer elegant heft all combine into offering an extraordinarily pleasant experience when one encounters it as a book.

    A friend of mine is a publisher of an extraordinary feminist imprint (which he - yes he, a gay man and former theology student and apprentice priest who studied in a monastery years ago - resurrected as an act of homage and belief) and he produces the most exquisite books, almost invariably written by women, or republishes forgotten classics, where no attention to detail is too great in producing a physically beautiful object, and no expense spared in the superb production values, which means that the books he produces, are, physically, absolutely gorgeous, and objects of art in their own right.

    With kindles, though, another great art form and cultural signifier will be lost, over time, one which I regret, and it is this. I'm writing of the personal library. I'm one of those who owns, possesses, has, thousands and thousands of books (mostly read, might I add). Many are on shelves (they have invaded three rooms in my mother's house, where floor to ceiling shelves are the norm), and many hundreds more live in uncatalogued boxes and cartons (yes, a nightmare for nerds, I know, but I have a fairly good idea of what lurks where, and if I don't, well, the primitive but rewarding pleasures of exploration and discovery await me), and they grow, spontaneously, wherever I put down roots for longer than a fortnight.

    So, I have an extensive personal library, a source of great pleasure, (and no small pride) as I'm one of those who used to find not just distraction, and entertainment, but also learning and knowledge and information in books. I still do, as books allow one to to delve deeper than online sources, but now, of course, they tend to supplement each other. The use of one does not exclude the use of the other.

    But, and here is an interesting thought, at least for me: whenever I used to visit a house, say a friend's parents' home when I was at university, or an academic's house, or, when in my teens or early twenties interviewing characters who had played some leading historical role in my country's history, in, say, the independence movement, who were then elderly gentlemen, I always examined their bookshelves to see what interested them, what moved them, what their intellectual as well as cultural and literary tastes were. Same with boys I knew at university - their book-shelves were subjected to a swift scrutiny (and yes, of course, some were found sadly wanting, but it was a handy short cut, and saved so much time). However, with the growth of the 'bookless' or digital, library, his particular means of analysing a person's character, increasingly, will be lost to us in future, a loss, I, for one, must admit I truly regret.
     

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