How long will my imac last?

Discussion in 'iMac' started by Danando1993, Feb 18, 2011.

  1. Danando1993 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2010
    #1
    i recently bought an i3 imac and i am wondering how long it should last me, based on the fact i use it for photoshop, iphoto, itunes, light gaming, email, internet surfing?

    Hoping it will last a good 2 years atleast
     
  2. morty192 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2010
    #2
    Depends on what u mean by 'last' if you mean how long will the technology stay at a decent pace then 2 year is certain. If, however, you mean how long before it breaks down and repairs are needed all machines are different it could die in a minute it could die in 10 years hope this helps in some way :)
     
  3. Danando1993 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2010
    #3
    thanks for the quick reply, yeah I meant how long would the i3 keep up with technology.
     
  4. gdeputy macrumors 6502a

    gdeputy

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Location:
    New York
    #4
    Your i3 is already behind the technology, and if you buy a new iMac within a few months that'll be behind too.

    Don't play that game, you'll get burnt. Use it until it becomes a chore, then buy a new computer.
     
  5. svenn macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2010
    #5
    It really depends on your uses. I have used 5+ year old Windows PCs without issue, but I have also ran some cpu intensive programs on a more recent system and did have issues. It looks like you should be ok for a few years, but only you can tell when it is not working for you anymore.
     
  6. MacHamster68, Feb 18, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2011

    MacHamster68 macrumors 68040

    MacHamster68

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2009
    #6
    i am still using iMac G3's 600/700mhz and they are 10 years old and still usable for everything they had been made for and they will do the same in 10 years from now too ..no doubt at all , thank you for reminding me i need to change the pram battery on one , the only spare part needed in 10 years ....a pram battery ....yea the good old days of high quality builds
    so in theory your i3 iMac should do the same in 10 years time exactly what it is doing now , ok by then it might be slower compared to the new computers you get in 10 years , but no less usable, as it will run the very same apps and OS it does run now ... if he lasts 10 years without needing spare parts as these dont come cheap after apple care ends and will likely render your iMac in a fancy paperweight :rolleyes:

    at least with my G3's that would not be a problem at all as here is a new use for them if they cannot be repaired any more , but my spare parts should last me a couple decades to keep them going
    [​IMG] otherwise a nice coffee table for the Mac fan
     
  7. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Location:
    The Finger Lakes Region
    #7
    IMHO if you do some regular software cache cleaning (about once every three or four months) using a cache cleaning program like Yasu and run all the cleaning routines. Just let the any cache cleaning program reboot your Mac and upon that boot, manually reboot the Mac again. This will rebuild that Macs startup/shutdown system cache.

    Doing this kind of cache cleaning every three or four months will keep a Mac almost running like new.

    Also consider uninstalling software on a Mac with something like AppCleaner (it's free). It will get all the little bits a program leaves all over your OS X.
     
  8. biggd macrumors 6502

    biggd

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2008
    Location:
    Calgary
    #8
    If your worried about this then you should have bough i5 or i7
    After 3-4 years, if you replace ur harddrive with an SSD it'll last you another 4 years. Add some RAM.

    The specs of a computer don't matter, as much as, how we use the computer and look after it.
     
  9. Danando1993 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2010
    #9
    thanks for all your replies, the i3 is perfectly suitable for my needs at the moment and runs great that is the reason why i did not buy an i5 or i7. I guess the way to keep it running its best is to look after it, im also going to be adding ram in the future.
     
  10. MacHamster68 macrumors 68040

    MacHamster68

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2009
    #10
    just one note , keep it clean , not only from the outside , but from the inside too , dust can kill a iMac or any computer really and a lot of people fear to open all in one computers especially iMac's , so they leave the dust inside until the iMac is dead , which is a bit to late and just holding a vacuum cleaner on the bottom and top vent is just not enough as you wont reach the heatsinks that way
     
  11. Sirmausalot macrumors 6502a

    Sirmausalot

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2007
    #12
    I've had mine since late 2007. Still running great and handling HD video editing. Encoding is a bit slow, but there are options. Do the following when you can:

    Upgrade to an SSD. Lightning fast and in two years price/space will be affordable.
    Run utility programs to clean up your harddrive, optimize and defragment it

    As for encoding, I could spend money on a better program to make that faster. 2 years ,easy! The upgrades above will get you even more.
     
  12. jlyanks85 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    #13
    Is installing a SSD hard? I'm sure it's not as easy as putting in more ram but I probably wouldn't be comfortable taking apart the imac to be able to do this. Even though I'd love to add a SSD on my i7 iMac.
     
  13. kuebby macrumors 68000

    kuebby

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2007
    Location:
    SFV
    #14
    You probably don't want to, installing HDs in aluminum iMacs is a pain (it requires removing the screen).
     
  14. jamesdmc macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2007
    Location:
    Cittagazze
    #15
    I wouldn't describe it as "easy", but it's also not as bad as you might think. I just pumped new life into my 2007 iMac by adding a SSD to it. It took about 2.5 hours, but mainly because I took it slow, being the first time I opened it up. If I had to do it again, I could get it open with the glass and LCD completely removed in less than 15 minutes. There are enough guides on the internet to walk someone through the procedure if they really wanted to do it.
     
  15. brachson macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2010
    #16
    I bought my PC 4 years ago (dual core) - it was nothing special, like i3 iMac these days. I still can play most of the games on atleast medium settings, work on PS with large files. The only thing I have problem with is HD encoding - I can do it but its pain.

    Technology is not so offensive these days - i7 will last at least 5-6 years imho. You will faster replace it due to new look desire rather than not enough power.
     
  16. Danando1993 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2010
    #17
    To be honest I would not even know how to open it up to vacuum dust, any tips?

    and what is the benefit of a SSD? sorry im not great with this stuff.
     
  17. Maverick713 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2009
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    #18
    Solid stat drives are faster, no moving parts, but the expense IMHO right now is not worth it. especially when you look at the size. in a couple years the price will be more justafiable, but right now if you can spare the time it taks for HDD to boot up and do what they need to do hold off on the SDD till the space is greater and the expense is lower.
     
  18. jlyanks85 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    #19
    I can't wait until SSD are standard in all apple computers or at least more affordable to add them on. I would of gladly added one when I was getting the i7 imac we bought in November, but it was like a extra 600 dollars. Wasn't going to pay that, when we were already going to pay 2600 for it. Hopefully when I get another imac in 2 years or so, adding a SSD is only like 200, maybe 300 at the most.
     
  19. Maverick713 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2009
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    #20
    I think in 2 years they will be absolutley more affordable, for 200 bucks what does everyone speculate the size will be? And how long before we have cars that drive themselves?
     
  20. Jdstew1234 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    #21
    I use mine for the Sam things as well as adobe illustrator and Video editing, I got mine about a year and a half ago and it has lasted great, it's a 24" c2d 2.66 ghz, it will be perfect for you
     
  21. jlyanks85 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    #22
    I would love cars that could drive themselves, but on a serious less sarcastic note I think they'll be more affordable that what they are now. Well hopefully anyway.
     
  22. Danando1993 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2010
    #23
    thats really good to hear, do you do regular cache cleaning ect? Im still unsure as to what the solid state drives do also?
     
  23. andrew0122 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2007
    Location:
    Springfieldvilletownvilleton, Missouri
    #24
    I would recommend using iFixit.com for the guide. They have helped me though several repairs. (The hyperlink is for the new 27" iMac hard drive replacement. They consider the replacement difficulty as moderate.)

    James, I've been looking at replacing my HDD in my 24" iMac 2.8 C2D. Any recommendations for a Solid State? I'm also considering upgrading the RAM. According to the iMac model number (7,1) it can unofficially utilize up to 6GB. I currently have 3 and I'm not sure 4 is going to cut it. OWC or MacSales.com says for the late '07 model only. . . I'm not sure if my iMac is considered late '07 or not, it is the Aluminum body. . . Anyone know?

    Appreciate the help.
     
  24. kuebby macrumors 68000

    kuebby

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2007
    Location:
    SFV
    #25
    I would guess that in 2 years SSDs will have 2x-4x the capacity they have now for the same price.

    Solid state drives are just a different way of storing data than traditional hard drives. Rather than using magnetic platters they use flash memory, which uses less power, has no moving parts, is faster, and has a longer life (so it is much less likely to fail).
     

Share This Page