How Much HD Space does Snow Leopard save??

Discussion in 'macOS' started by jbrown, Sep 21, 2009.

  1. jbrown macrumors 6502a

    jbrown

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #1
    I went from having 16gig free before installing, to 33gig!!!!

    Can this be right??:D
     
  2. brendu macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2009
    Location:
    USA
    #2
    yeah in some very non technical terms, SL actually opens up alot of HDD space that was not even shown as available in Leo. On a 320Gig HDD under LEO it said I had 300 Gigs with some used and some available, under SL it says i have 320 Gigs with some used and some available.. A more techy guy will be able to tell you exacatly why but yes, that is quite possible, and probable.
     
  3. stainlessliquid macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2006
    #3
    No, Leopard is only 12gbs from a clean install without bloat like printer drivers and languages. I dont remember how much space SL took up when I installed it since I forgot to look after I installed a few things but Im guessing it was around 10 or 11gbs. It was not very much less than 12gbs.

    Snow Leopard reads the size of HDD's differently than Leopard does, you are not actually gaining extra space, bytes are just calculated using a different formula.
     
  4. Hellhammer Moderator

    Hellhammer

    Staff Member

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    Dec 10, 2008
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    Finland
    #4
    That's because Leopard sees GB as 1024MB and Snow Leopard sees it as 1000MB. That doesn't free up space but because SL is basically rewrote Leopard, Apple got rid of useless files and made existing ones smaller. I got about 7GB more free space after installing SL
     
  5. mrboult macrumors 6502

    mrboult

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    London, England
    #5
    Yes It is very possible with a large HD that is near full. I went from 12GB free to 22GB free on a 160GB Drive.

    A lot of people are saying that this is because of the way SnowLeopard now calculates a GB but the difference is not that extreme.

    Quite simply . . .

    A Leopard GB is 1024MB
    A SnowLeopard GB is 1000MB

    My Free space in Leopard was: 12 x 1024MB = 12,288MB

    My Free space in SnowLeopard is: 22 x 1000MB = 22,000MB

    The difference of free space between the two installs is:
    22,000MB - 12,288MB = 9,712MB

    THE POINT is that the 24MB per GB difference is not the reason people are seeing all this new free space.

    Part of the reason is the smaller footprint of SnowLeopard. And in part due to Snowleopard's new file compression system.
     
  6. Etnies419 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    #6
    I don't think anyone is saying that. Pretty much everyone knows that Snow Leopard frees up some space (about 7 GB). However, what people are saying is that Snow Leopard is not freeing up as much space as it appears it is, because of how it calculates the space.
     
  7. gr8tfly macrumors 603

    gr8tfly

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    #7
    Actual number of bytes saved on my early 2009 17" ubMBP: 11.2GB (1000 bytes/k)
     
  8. jbrown thread starter macrumors 6502a

    jbrown

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #8
    THANKS FOR THE REPLIES - INTERESTING TOPIC!

    So in the real world, have I saved approx 7 gig?

    So before = 16gb
    plus 7gb
    Equals 23gb new realworld space?

    But it is telling me 33gb - so for theoretical debate - if I tried to copy a file larger than 23gb, it wouldn't fit?:mad:
     
  9. gr8tfly macrumors 603

    gr8tfly

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2006
    Location:
    ~119W 34N
    #9
    Yes, it would fit. There's nothing "hidden" in the free space shown. If it says 33GB free, then that's what you have free.

    If you showed 16GB free, while booted in 10.5, you actually had 17.18GB free. So, 17.18+7=24.18GB.

    BUT - you saved more than 7GB if the system is showing 33GB free. It looks like you saved 33-17.18 GB, or 16.18GB. That seems high - the most I can recall seeing reported saved is around 13GB. In any event, whatever it's showing you now is the real number of bytes free - meaning you theoretically can copy a file up to 33GB in size onto the drive.
     

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