How often should the OS be updated.

Discussion in 'macOS' started by a-m-k, Apr 29, 2018.

  1. a-m-k macrumors 6502a

    a-m-k

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    #1
    I thought keeping with the most current OS was a good thing? What I have been told (offline) that it wasn't necessary to do so. Who's right?
     
  2. flyinmac macrumors 68040

    flyinmac

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    #2
    Depends on your priorities. If getting all the latest security patches is important to you, then install every update that comes out.

    If never having anything change is important to you, then don’t update.

    Personally, I’ve never had any problems with any iOS updates. And I’ve been through almost all of them. I had the first iPhone. Though I did miss iOS 2 through 5 during my Android phase.
     
  3. a-m-k thread starter macrumors 6502a

    a-m-k

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    #3
    Security is a good thing. :) That is why I always update.
     
  4. C DM macrumors Sandy Bridge

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    Oct 17, 2011
    #4
    What was the reasoning that was given for that?
     
  5. a-m-k thread starter macrumors 6502a

    a-m-k

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    #5
    I read it somewhere... online.
     
  6. TC_GoldRush macrumors 6502

    TC_GoldRush

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    #6
    I always hold off a bit on updates, until all the kinks are ironed out.
     
  7. C DM macrumors Sandy Bridge

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    #7
    That doesn't say much about the reasoning that was offered for it.
     
  8. Altis macrumors 68030

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    #8
    I used to update as soon as I could to the latest version, until iOS 7.0 dropped.

    Since then, performance and reliability are absolutely no guarantee.

    Now I try to only go at most one full version ahead of what the device was designed for, but of course in some cases you'll be forced to update with no way of going back at all.
     
  9. Starship67 Suspended

    Starship67

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    #9
    Not directed at you. But definelty and escpecially if read on here cuz a lot of users on here talk out their other hole. :)
     
  10. FeliApple macrumors 65816

    FeliApple

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    #10
    I believe in staying in initial iOS versions to maintain top performance. I've been doing that since my first iOS update that I didn't like (6 to 7) and it has worked fine ever since.
    It has drawbacks (App compatibility is the worst). But a lot of advantages. (Want the two largest? Top-notch battery life and performance. Both crucial things generally affected by iOS updates).
    My examples? iPhone 6s on iOS 9.3.3; my iPad Pro 9.7 on iOS 9.3.4, and my iPod Touch 5G on iOS 6.0
     
  11. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

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    #11
    I believe the OP is talking about updating MacOS, not iOS.....?

    In any event, IMHO updating, especially when security updates appear, is very important. I always do a MacOS update when one becomes available, and I also update my iPads and iPhone when an iOS becomes available. That said, though, I usually wait a day or so and look at comments on MR before actually doing the update in case there is a glitch somewhere, which of course has happened in the past.
     
  12. C DM macrumors Sandy Bridge

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    #12
    Seeing that this is in an iOS forum...
     
  13. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

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    #13
    I guess we'll have to wait until the OP returns to clarify exactly what it is she meant.....
     
  14. a-m-k thread starter macrumors 6502a

    a-m-k

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    #14
    I mean Operating System. Aren't they usually improving on certain parts of the current OS?
     
  15. C DM macrumors Sandy Bridge

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    #15
    Any general operating system? Usually there are updates that get released to address issues here and there, security concerns, and sometimes to add new features and/or change something.
     
  16. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

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    #16
    A-M-K, I think the reason for the confusion is that you had posted this thread in the section which is about iOS, which is the operating system for iPhone and iPads. The operating system for the computers is macOS -- currently "High Sierra." Actually, though, your question is relevant to either or any operating systems. As I said earlier, I always update my iOS (iPhones and iPads) within a day or so of an iOS update, and I do the same when there is an update to High Sierra as well. Also, my Apple watch, which is run under Watch OS. When there is a security issue that suddenly crops up, Apple is pretty quick to prepare and issue a fix for it, and those security updates should be done as promptly as possible. I usually do a change to a new version of the OS or iOS within a few days of its release, just to make sure there are no major glitches.

    To further answer your question: some people prefer not to update their computer system or their iOS devices when an update is released, and the reasons for that vary, but usually it is because the individual is using an older machine already and is hesitant to update it out of concern that the machine will not function as well with the update, or will slow down significantly. In some cases the choice not to update is made due to possible incompatibility with software that is already in the machine, which happens with older computers or when someone is working with specialized software in a particular field. In the case of iOS, some iPhone users in the past did what is called "jailbreaking" to their iPhones, and this is subsequently affected by future updates, so they will choose to remain on the older version rather than update. In more recent times jailbreaking has become less popular, as Apple has continued to provide new features and functionality to its iPhones and iPads.

    After a certain point, new versions of the OS will not be able to work in an older computer, so that is when many people choose at that point to purchase a new machine or just keep going with the old one under the last version of the OS that works in it.
     
  17. a-m-k thread starter macrumors 6502a

    a-m-k

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    #17
    If this means anything, I will have this MBP for six years sometime this coming December. Which probably doubled the amount of time I had my old MBP so, I expect the current problems with the hardware being as "old" as it is. (I say "old" in quotes because my cousin who was helping me to some degree said it was "old". I honestly wouldn't mind holding on to this machine until it is totally necessary. I think someone said that parts for Mid-2012 MBP's were being sold and I think they also said actual MBP's were being sold even now. (I just don't remember when that was said.)
     
  18. Clix Pix, May 6, 2018
    Last edited: May 6, 2018

    Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

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    #18
    A 2012 MBP IS "old," but that doesn't mean you should toss it into the nearest waste can! If it is still doing what you need it to do, that is what matters. If you are having problems with hardware, then, yes, those issues should be repaired and parts replaced if need be, by an experienced tech or someone who is very familiar with Macs. There are shops which are specifically authorized by Apple to handle repairs, and that would be the best place to take your machine if you need to do so.

    With regard to software, if Apple is still providing updates, especially the Security Updates, to your machine, that is good. Whether or not it will be able to download, install and use the next version of the OS remains to be seen, though, and we won't know which machines will be compatible with that new version until it is announced by Apple.

    You may have been told that older MBP models are still being sold -- well, yes, but not the ones from 2012. Apple still is selling as new the 2015 MacBook Pro in the 15" size (not sure about the 13", but I don't think so). Apple also sells refurbished models from usually the past year or so. Only in the used market such as eBay or on sites which sell older Macs would you find a 2012 MBP for sale these days, and it would be used, not new.

    One reason that many people prefer a slightly older model such as the 2015 MBP is that it still has the "legacy" ports on it and the MagSafe connector. Since 2016 MacBook Pros have been coming with USB-C ports and no USB-A ports, no MagSafe. This requires some shift in how one does things, and usually a few adapters or new cables with the appropriate connectors for peripherals are required. It's not a huge hassle but it is a consideration when thinking about buying a new MBP or MacBook.

    Edited to Add: At this in time your machine is or will soon be considered "Vintage" by Apple, meaning that it falls into the category of not having been manufactured for more than five and less than seven years, with the result that Apple will no longer provide hardware service and support (supplying parts to authorized shops, etc.). If you live in California, however, parts would still be available at authorized repair facilities.

    This link explains in more detail, with Apple's definitions of "vintage" and "obsolete":

    https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201624
     
  19. a-m-k thread starter macrumors 6502a

    a-m-k

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    #19
    Thank you. Like I said. I am going to do my best to hold on to this MBP as long as I can. Believe it or not, I actually love this MBP. It's lasted me this long and the only thing that has cost me anything to repair is my charger. (I've learned my lesson and I think I found a good way to charge it if I have to. When I accidentally broke my charger, I never had the extension cord plugged in because I always thought I was close enough to an outlet because the cord never pulled. The only thing I can think of that possibly broke it was because I happened to move and the cord was pulled away from the MBP. (I can't explain what I mean. Sorry.)
     
  20. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

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    #20
    As I said earlier, as long as your current MBP is doing what you need it to do and there are no major hardware or software issues, that's great! No need to be concerned about replacing it. When the time comes that you cannot update to the latest version of the OS, that might be the time to consider replacement.....
     
  21. a-m-k thread starter macrumors 6502a

    a-m-k

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    #21
    What do you mean "unable to update to the latest version of of the OS"?
     
  22. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

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    #22
    At some point your computer will be deemed by Apple not to be compatible with whatever the latest version of the OS will be.... That could happen in September or October 2018 with the arrival of whatever they're going to call the version of the OS that comes after High Sierra, or it could happen in September or October 2019 with whatever THAT version of the OS will be. Since your machine is already pretty much in the "vintage" category, that time is going to come sooner rather than later.

    That doesn't mean you can no longer use your computer -- you will be able to continue running it just fine on High Sierra, but you would not be able to upgrade to the newest version of the OS. I'm not sure what Apple's criteria is for establishing compatibility, but presumably it is based on the demands made on hardware from whatever the new software is that they are now offering to users. Older hardware just cannot cope with some of the functionality that is built into new software versions.

    Each year when they release a new version of the computer OS software (and also, for that matter, new versions of iOS, too) Apple publishes a list of machines which will be compatible with that new version. When one looks at the list and does not find one's computer listed, then that is the time for making decisions about what to do in the future.
     
  23. flyinmac, May 7, 2018
    Last edited: May 7, 2018

    flyinmac macrumors 68040

    flyinmac

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    #23
    In general I agree with your statements.

    On the topic of when Apple ends support...

    Apple’s criteria for determining which computers can run the current OS is usually based on nothing but either laziness or greed.

    It’s not that the new versions of MacOS won’t run on old hardware, it’s that Apple specifically blocks the OS from running on older hardware using the computers identification/model/revision information.

    I have a 2006 Mac Pro running El Capitan 10.11.6 (Apple started preventing the installation of MacOS after 10.7.x).

    I have a 2009 iMac running High Sierra 10.13.4 (Apple started preventing the Installation of MacOS after 10.11.6).

    Getting the old hardware to run a newer version of MacOS than Apple allows, is basically a matter of editing the file that says what computers are allowed to run the operating system.

    The first credible change in system support was with Sierra (because it requires microprocessors to be able to understand SSE 4.x instructions). That would have been a justified reason to finally require something higher than my 2006 Mac Pro. But Apple blocked it many years ago. Despite them blocking it, many of us have been running the latest Mac OS versions for years (up until Sierra, by editing the list of permitted computers).

    Many of us continue to do the same thing to run High Sierra on computers that have SSE 4.x, despite Apple blocking them on the permit list.

    Apple’s decisions have never actually been based on whether the hardware can run the software or not. Our old machines still run the new versions quite fast (sometimes faster).
     
  24. Fishrrman macrumors P6

    Fishrrman

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #24
    I don't "update immediately".
    I keep ALL "automatic updating" turned OFF.
    I don't want ANY "updating" going on behind my back.
    I don't mind being informed that an update "is available", but I want to reserve the right to make my own decision as to whether I should install it... or not.

    Frankly, I don't care about "security". Really, I don't.
    It doesn't bother me in the least that my Mac might not be "secure", and I don't loose any sleep over it.

    I've come to the point where I actually try to use a version of the OS that is "one or two iterations back" from the cutting edge -- because being on the cutting edge also means dealing with all the problems that arise from being there.

    However, I -do- keep at least one "test drive" around with the latest release. Sitting here on the desk I have an old drive (pulled from an old Dell laptop that somebody found at the computer recycling center and gave to me) with the latest High Sierra 10.3.5 public beta on it. Even though I boot it now and then, and it runs well enough, I don't use it as my "main OS". It's just to fool around with.

    For a 2012 MBP, I'd put an SSD into it and use either El Cap or Low Sierra.
    If I dared to try High Sierra, I'd make sure that it was installed with HFS+ instead of APFS.

    My opinion only.
    Others will disagree.
    Some will disagree vehemently.
     
  25. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

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    #25
    Yes, I realize that there are people who have the technical skills and know-how to make tweaks and changes so that they can run more current versions of the OS on their older machines and resolve any issues that might come along with that. The thing is, the general Mac user population does not usually even think of that, nor do many users especially need or want to do so, particularly since it's a lot easier to just run over to the local Apple store and buy the newest goodies Apple has to offer....

    I agree with Fisherrman in that for the time being I would install an SSD and additional RAM in that 2012 machine and keep on using it as long as it is still functioning and doing the job that the user needs and wants. I also would keep installing the updates as they come along and if the machine is still compatible with the next version of the OS, I would download, install and use it, too.
     

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