How would you fix this cracked door frame?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by sdilley14, Nov 26, 2014.

  1. sdilley14 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Mesa, AZ
    #1
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    How would one go about fixing this cracked door frame? I'm pretty much an idiot when it comes to handy work, so any suggestions are welcomed! :)
     
  2. ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

    ucfgrad93

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  3. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    Jan 4, 2002
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    CT
    #3
    If you were a handy person, you need to take the molding off. Pull apart the jam and put a filler strip in. There is no way to fix that wood. It needs to be replaced.
     
  4. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    Boston
    #4
    I'd be calling someone, as mentioned by MacNut, you cannot fix it, but rather replace it.
     
  5. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

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    The Misty Mountains
    #5
    Hard to tell by the pics what I'm looking at, but this looks old and like it's a big piece of pine. There might be some concern with maintaining the look. Is there drywall there? Is that pine paneling/planking, or is that molding going around the door? Is the door hing mounted into a dedicated door frame, a 2x4, or something else? Most modern doors come with a door frame that slides/mounts into a door opening framed by 2x4s. For a secure mounting, hinge screws go through both the door frame if there is one, into the wood underneath, in most modern structures, 2x4s. For somthing old, it could be more solid than a modern door frame.

    I see a couple of possibilities. The easiest but more expensive is to call someone. But if you are up the the challenge, you just need a solid piece of wood to mount the door hinges into. The molding around the door frame (on the face of the door if there is molding) will have to be removed, prying it off, without ruining it (ideally) because it looks old. After removed, you might see a piece of door frame (3/4" thick) piece of wood that the hinges are screwing into or something else, like a 2x4, or a chunk of wood framing.

    If pine paneling/planking runs to the edge of the door, the piece next to door would have to be removed, to get at what's underneath. If there is a door frame, instead of ripping out the entire frame (that goes all the way around the door, with a reciprocating saw the portion of the frame where the hinges mount and the 2x4 underneath (if there is one) can be cut out and replaced. Sounding complicated? :)
     
  6. carlgo macrumors 68000

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    Monterey CA
    #6
    Huntn knows what he is talking about. That or hire someone because you would need a bunch of tools to do the job, including a reciprocating saw most likely, and that would cost you as much. But if your life ahead indicates other repairs, like if you buy old houses, then tool purchases pay off.
     
  7. Huntn, Nov 28, 2014
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2014

    Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

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    The Misty Mountains
    #7
    Thanks! Having the rights tools is a must. As a Mikey Mouse fix, I wonder if you could take the trim off, work some glue into the cracks, and run some screws through the cracked wood to hold it together and then use fatter hinge screws? Maybe, maybe not. :)

    Question for the OP, are those hinge screws going into door or the frame? If looking at the door with the cracked wood, then short of replacing the door you might have to cut out parts of the door, and replace with wood which may not be a satisfactory solution.
     
  8. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #8
    My the looks of it there is nothing behind that wood. I don't know if there is anything solid to screw into.
     
  9. Renzatic Suspended

    Renzatic

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    Aug 3, 2011
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    Gramps, what the hell am I paying you for?
    #9
    I've been helping out a friend with his business, and getting into some pretty heavy woodworking these last couple of months. One thing I've discovered is that wood glue actually ends up being considerably stronger than the grain surrounding it. If you use clamps to put pressure on it, and leave it for about, say, 3-4 hours, you won't need the screws at all.

    The problem is, it doesn't look like it's a clean break, so it won't make it disappear entirely. And the stain on the wood will make it harder to fix and disguise.
     
  10. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

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    #10
    I remember that too now that you've jogged my memory! :)
     
  11. DewGuy1999 macrumors 68040

    DewGuy1999

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2009
    #11
    If you do go the wood glue route you can use some sawdust mixed with the glue to make a filler for the cracks. To "revitalize" the screw holes you can use wooden toothpicks, wooden skewers or wooden golf tees along with wood glue to fill them. When the glue dries you can then take a box cutter or X-acto knife, etc. to trim off the excess toothpicks, skewers or tees. Then re-drill the screw holes if needed and rehang the door.
     

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